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Hello,
I am in the process of completing my loft and getting excited about being able to raise pigeons. The floor is plywood, and I cannot decide what would be best to use as a floor covering, such as sand, wood chips, straw etc. If anyone has an idea or opinion as to what they prefer and why, I would really appreciate their opinions. So I have something to base my decisions on.
Thanks.
 

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Hello,
I am in the process of completing my loft and getting excited about being able to raise pigeons. The floor is plywood, and I cannot decide what would be best to use as a floor covering, such as sand, wood chips, straw etc. If anyone has an idea or opinion as to what they prefer and why, I would really appreciate their opinions. So I have something to base my decisions on.
Thanks.
Many people leave the plywood bare, and scrape it on a regular basis to clean it. I personally use wood shavings on the loft floor. They absorb moisture, and make scraping/cleaning a lot easier.
 

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I use normal wood, and have to scrape alot :( But today I thought of something new....I'm thinking of putting a plastic sheet on the wood, that way I can just pull out the sheet and wash/replace. Just a thought. Wish you good luck,Peace,
YaSin :)
 

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As Paki Tipplers, and others mention, and I agree, bare floors are best, whether they be plywood or concrete. One of the first signs you'll get when you have a bird, or birds, that are either ill, or getting that way is a change in their droppings. Having loose bedding can hide this early indicator, IMO, longer than just having plain floors, thus giving a starting illness longer to take hold before you may become aware of the fact that you have an ill bird(s).

Karyn
 

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What breed will you have. Now show type birds that are not as flighty as race birds. Pine shavings work and look OK. Scraping the floor daily works well with most breeds. They have straight type hoes that work well for scraping. I would not USE SAND. it holds moisture and can cause sickness. While it look good. Back in the 70s it was popular I even tried had a place I could get white sand sure looked good But it does give a place where sickness can start.
 

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I was using wood shavings but it was a perfect place for a snake to hide and kill 2 of my squabs. Nothing but bare floors now!
 

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I use ground corn cob bedding. They stay put when the birds are on the floor exercising/testing their wings and nothing keeps a loft dryer. A dry loft is a healthy loft. I may try the bare floor system in my new loft but for now, I haven't found any drawbacks to the corn cob bedding. Cleaning is a breeze.

Jim
 

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I have tried everything but have settle in the last few years on Oil Dry. You get this at any auto parts store. Be sure it's 100% clay. Basically it is the same thing as Kitty Litter.
It's super absorbant and economical. Danny Joe
 

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bare floors and scrape daily and mop with thin bleach,no dust or damp,if you cover your floor it holds damp and floor WILL rot,i have fans in my loft top and bottom,floor is dry most time,breeding time is messy though,pigeons are hard work full stop,
 

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good idea,but it brings rats in england,plus it costs money,if u use fans that gets rid of odors,fungus grows underneath,is that safe to walk on?good idea but england is so so wet,i would go with that idea if i could find cheap solution
 

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Because of the weather and critters I put a painted/sealed plywood floor in my loft. I place aspen wood shavings on the floor under the perches. I have to do very little scraping as most of the droppings fall into the shavings. Works for me.
 
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