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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm starting a new loft because my flock is outgrowing the current one. I keep Giant Runts and TX Pioneers, so fairly heavy, large birds.

I'm thinking of a 12 x 8 ft loft. My current idea is to build a basic frame (2 x 4s), make a solid floor on 8x8 ft and a wire floor for the front part 4x8 ft. I'm thinking of enclosing the 8x8 foot section, and simply using wire mesh for the "aviary" part.

I'm having trouble figuring out a good way of constructing the walls around the 8x8 section. Any ideas for easily putting up walls? I live in Texas, so insulation is not a priority.

Also, any other ideas/tips/suggestions regarding construction/layout would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

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Hello,

I'm starting a new loft because my flock is outgrowing the current one. I keep Giant Runts and TX Pioneers, so fairly heavy, large birds.

I'm thinking of a 12 x 8 ft loft. My current idea is to build a basic frame (2 x 4s), make a solid floor on 8x8 ft and a wire floor for the front part 4x8 ft. I'm thinking of enclosing the 8x8 foot section, and simply using wire mesh for the "aviary" part.

I'm having trouble figuring out a good way of constructing the walls around the 8x8 section. Any ideas for easily putting up walls? I live in Texas, so insulation is not a priority.

Also, any other ideas/tips/suggestions regarding construction/layout would be appreciated.

Thanks.
Easiest way is to build the wall frames on the ground, and then put them in place. Requires a second person to hold the wall while you put it up, but it keeps you from having to toenail the studs into the sill and top plate. After you get three walls up, you can put on sheathing (and siding if desired). I use EPDM roofing material, because I can just stretch it over the roof and tack it in place with roofing nails. (Of course, I have a fifty foot roll of it sitting in my back shed that is leftover from building a fish pond. Not sure I would use that if I had to go buy it :D)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your replies. Ptras, thanks for the tips of putting the walls up. I know the studs in the house are 16" apart, but I really want to keep the weight/material usage down on the loft. So I was thinking one stud every 4 feet. Do you guys think that'll make the walls too weak?

I was thinking about 12 x 8, because the ply wood I have is a 8x4 sheet, which would allow me to cover the entire section with only 2 sheets of plywood (per floor/wall).
 

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Depends on the thickness of the wall material you are using. I built a shed once and put the studs 2' apart with 3/8 siding and it bowed out between them. 4' is way to far unless the siding is at least 5/8 and more 2x4s are cheaper than heavier siding.
 

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Depends on the thickness of the wall material you are using. I built a shed once and put the studs 2' apart with 3/8 siding and it bowed out between them. 4' is way to0 far unless the siding is at least 5/8 and more 2x4s are cheaper than heavier siding.
I agree. I would not go further apart than 2 feet. Keep in mind that the difference between studs every two feet and every 16 inches is only two studs per eight foot wall. At $2.70 per stud, I would opt for the 16" spacing. If money is really an issue, go from 2x4 studs to 2x3 studs. That will save you almost $1.00 per stud, and will still give you the structure you need.

I agree with an earlier post that stated you should use PT wood for the floor joists and sills. Otherwise, you can expect to replace them in four years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay, I guess I'll put a few more 2 x 4s in.

I'm starting construction this weekend and will make a couple of pictures to post them...

Thanks.
 
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