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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchasing a loft (shed) and wanted to know if anyone has any suggestions on brands. My budget is in the $100 to $600 range (does not include foundation).

You guys know alot more than I do about lofts so let me know if I'm missing anything. I know I needs to be kept in the open. Somewhere the sun can dry it. Must have ventalation.

As far as size goes, nothing smaller than a 6 x 7. Planning to have about 25 birds max.

I'd like something simple, easy to clean.

Does anyone know off hand how much a slab of concrete, 10 x 15 would cost me to put down?

Thank you.
 

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Concrete is regional so you will need to call a local supplier.

At the price you are talking, you are likely to wind up designing and doing it from scratch. Things you need to consider:
• Perch space and perches
• nest boxes
• entrance/exit for humans AND birds
• Aviary space.

I would suggest you do a bit of reading on what works best for the types of birds you will be raising. Some types have special requirements well beyond what i mention above.
 

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Purchasing a loft (shed) and wanted to know if anyone has any suggestions on brands. My budget is in the $100 to $600 range (does not include foundation).

You guys know alot more than I do about lofts so let me know if I'm missing anything. I know I needs to be kept in the open. Somewhere the sun can dry it. Must have ventalation.

As far as size goes, nothing smaller than a 6 x 7. Planning to have about 25 birds max.

I'd like something simple, easy to clean.

Does anyone know off hand how much a slab of concrete, 10 x 15 would cost me to put down?

Thank you.
The very max in a 6x7 would be 21 birds.. remember not to over crowd them..and do not forget the aviary which does not count for living space.
 

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Does anyone know off hand how much a slab of concrete, 10 x 15 would cost me to put down? Thank you.
If you go with premix, you can get a quote from your local concrete supplier. However, it is probably going to be more cost effective to mix it yourself. The reason is that most sellers of premix will have a minimum cubic yardage you must purchase to make it worth their while to deliver it.

This is the way to determine how many cubic yards (or cubic feet) you need. http://www.decks.com/calculators/concrete.aspx My calculation is that you need 50 cubic feet, which is a little less than two cubic yards.

At Home Depot, a 60 pound bag of Quikrete(tm) concrete mix costs $2.57. According to the instructions on the bag, each bag will make a 1.5' X 1.0' area 4 inches thick. Since 10' X 15' is 150 Square feet, you would need 100 bags. That is a total outlay of $257.00 for concrete. Bear in mind, that 100 bags is 6,000 pounds of concrete. That means you either have to pay to get it delivered, or make multiple trips. (Home depot will load them in your car for you, but you still have to unload them at home!) The average full-size sedan will hold about 1,000 pounds, so that means six trips.
 

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And what ptras leaves out is site prep. Better to have someone do the pour for you unless you have done it before. I have and will never do it again. Not worth the time.

Another thought, you really don't want to put a loft on a concrete slab. Consider using crusher or hard pack stone instead.
 

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And what ptras leaves out is site prep. Better to have someone do the pour for you unless you have done it before. I have and will never do it again. Not worth the time.

Another thought, you really don't want to put a loft on a concrete slab. Consider using crusher or hard pack stone instead.
I disagree on both points here. Concrete makes a great loft floor. Easy to scrape, and dries quickly.

I have done a few concrete jobs in the past, and it isn't that difficult. You need to be sure the site is level, and build a form (frame) that is level. For a 4 inch thick slab, you can build forms from 2"X6" lumber, which is reasonably priced. Better yet, build it from pressure-treated lumber and just leave it in place.

I called my local ready-mix company, and found that the price is $102.68 per yard, with a five yard minimum for delivery. For the slab in question, that is a cost of $513.40 for the less than two yards of concrete needed. Additionally, even if you have ready-mix delivered, you still need to prep the site, and you must have access for the truck to get within 25 feet of the site. In my backyard, there is no way that a cement mixer can get within 25 feet of anything, which means there is an additional cost for renting a concrete pump.

Hiring someone to do the site prep and build the form will probably run in the range of a three to six hundred dollars. I look at it this way: $267 for bagged concrete, plus $40 for delivery, plus about $75 for materials for the form and a screen to reinforce the concrete slab. That brings the total to $382. My labor is free, so there would be no additional expenses, unless I was feeling lazy and rented a cement mixer from Home Depot at $40 for the day. Even with the mixer rental, and lunch and beer for my buddy who will help me, I'm still under $500.

Getting it done for you looks like about a $1,000 job. I personally would opt for saving the $500 and doing it myself. It's not hard to build a form and mix the concrete yourself. And, you get a sense of accomplishment from doing the job yourself.
 

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Ptras,

I think the experiences I have had with concrete are all on my end. Your scenario makes sense.

As to concrete as a non-preferred floor, my experience with concrete is that it seems to stay humid longer. Wouldn't/Doesn't that create a dampness issue? or are you raising the floor off the concrete for ventilation?
 

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Ptras,

I think the experiences I have had with concrete are all on my end. Your scenario makes sense.

As to concrete as a non-preferred floor, my experience with concrete is that it seems to stay humid longer. Wouldn't/Doesn't that create a dampness issue? or are you raising the floor off the concrete for ventilation?
Once the concrete is fully cured, it will not create any more moisture than crushed stone or stone dust. It has the added advantage of being critter proof. My mentor has a concrete floor in one of his lofts. He uses the deep litter method, and the concrete is never really exposed to the loft. On the occasion that he does a deep cleaning, he can scrape the floor using a regular garden hoe. My wood floor doesn't give me the same advantage. I have to be real careful scraping, to keep from ripping up the surface of my loft floor.
 

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Purchasing a loft (shed) and wanted to know if anyone has any suggestions on brands. My budget is in the $100 to $600 range (does not include foundation).

You guys know alot more than I do about lofts so let me know if I'm missing anything. I know I needs to be kept in the open. Somewhere the sun can dry it. Must have ventalation.

As far as size goes, nothing smaller than a 6 x 7. Planning to have about 25 birds max.

I'd like something simple, easy to clean.

Does anyone know off hand how much a slab of concrete, 10 x 15 would cost me to put down?

Thank you.
How high above ground would the slab be?You might have to put in a rat wall depending on your local laws etc.This link should help out with the estimate.
http://www.sakrete.com/products/calculators.cfm/selectedCalculator/Concrete#concrete
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ptras,

Thanks for the rough estimates. That gives me an idea of what kind of money I have left to work with when picking out a shed.

The tips on laying concrete will be helpful. The process seems simple enough, just need the time, supplies and manpower to get the job done. I do like to have that sense of self accomplishment.

Jaysen,

I would love to go with loose gravel, seems much simpler to set up and less in cost and time. However, I was worried about the mice/insects that would eventually find there way in there. Cleaning would also be tough as the poop would become lodged in the gravel.

I'd like to be able to just spray down with hose when cleaning and scrap if need be.

birdman,

Thank you for the link.

Looks like I'll need to do some more research.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What do you guys think about a plastic or metal shed? I think they would be easier to clean and dry much quicker than wood.

Are there any other materials I should look at?
 

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What do you guys think about a plastic or metal shed? I think they would be easier to clean and dry much quicker than wood.

Are there any other materials I should look at?
The condensation inside a metal shed will make you cry. Venting it more will not help. Guaranteed.
 
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