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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Okay I did check that first but was only looking in PMB, but I see a wildlife rescue centre is in Durban. I’ll try contact them. Didn’t think doves would be considered for rescue given how common they are and I’m sure space for rescue centres is a concern.
 

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Are you referring to CROW? First find out what there policies are reg raising baby doves. You don't want them getting euthanized. There's a FB group: Broken Wings. Located in Durban. Maybe you can also contact them. Keep us updated plse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
It’s called fallen angels and it’s actually in Ashburton, but read their fb page and they say they’re a parrot rescue centre.
Thanks for the heads up didn’t think to ask if they’ll get euthanised.

If I can’t find anywhere, are ring-necked doves relatively easy to look after once they’re grown up and is it legal to have them as pets in SA? Assuming these two survive, I do have the space to keep them.
 

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Ok that sounds good if you can keep them. Or you can try a soft release later on (I assume you have wild doves in your garden) and we can guide you through the whole process. Wel, I don't think one is allowed to keep them as they are considered wildlife. But who is going to check on you anyway? I also have some doves (incl a redeyed dove) and speckled pigeons in my aviary that are unreleasable.
 

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The problem with handraising birds is that people think they can just put them outside when older and expect them to adapt and survive. This is not the case. In nature the parents teach them where to find food, water and shelter. Handraised babies don't have these skills and will have problems surviving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Ok that sounds good if you can keep them. Or you can try a soft release later on (I assume you have wild doves in your garden) and we can guide you through the whole process. Wel, I don't think one is allowed to keep them as they are considered wildlife. But who is going to check on you anyway? I also have some doves (incl a redeyed dove) and speckled pigeons in my aviary that are unreleasable.
Yes I leave bird seed on my veranda so I get doves visiting and they’re a little less skittish, so a soft release might be possible and probably the best thing for them assuming they are prepared to live in the wild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The problem with handraising birds is that people think they can just put them outside when older and expect them to adapt and survive. This is not the case. In nature the parents teach them where to find food, water and shelter. Handraised babies don't have these skills and will have problems surviving.
I already have heating available as I have an African grey that lives outside, so aside from an aviary and feeding trays I’m assuming that would be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The one baby is a fair amount smaller and weaker than the other, it’s been like this since I got them. When I go to them to feed them the larger one immediately starts chirping and fluffing itself up while the smaller one will continue to sleep. Eventually it does catch on though based off how the other one is acting.

It also seems to lose interest before its crop is full, although I can get it interested again if I gently tap its beak with finger. By comparison the larger one seems to always want food. I make sure that the food is room temperature and I’ve checked that small one is pooping. Is it possible they could have hatched enough days apart for there to be this much of a difference?

If this is not normal, how could I remedy this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The one baby is a fair amount smaller and weaker than the other, it’s been like this since I got them. When I go to them to feed them the larger one immediately starts chirping and fluffing itself up while the smaller one will continue to sleep. Eventually it does catch on though based off how the other one is acting.

It also seems to lose interest before its crop is full, although I can get it interested again if I gently tap its beak with finger. By comparison the larger one seems to always want food. I make sure that the food is room temperature and I’ve checked that small one is pooping. Is it possible they could have hatched enough days apart for there to be this much of a difference?

If this is not normal, how could I remedy this?
Having said that, the smaller one was far more active and enthusiastic at their second feeding.
 

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They hatch one or 2 days apart (that's how eggs get laid) so it's normal for one baby to be larger than the other. Just make sure the smaller one gets the same amount of food. You can make the formula bit warmer than room temperature. If the crops seem a bit slow emptying, add a bit of human baby applesauce. That helps a lot with digestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
They hatch one or 2 days apart (that's how eggs get laid) so it's normal for one baby to be larger than the other. Just make sure the smaller one gets the same amount of food. You can make the formula bit warmer than room temperature. If the crops seem a bit slow emptying, add a bit of human baby applesauce. That helps a lot with digestion.
Thanks will try out applesauce. Regarding their age, is it safe to assume they were a week old when I got them seeing as their eyes were already open? Just want to figure out where I am on that feeding chart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Just an update:

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I tried applesauce and the bigger ones crop is now emptying between feeds. The smaller one still has a little bit in its crop. If their crops are clearing overnight, is it fine to still feed them during the day if they have a little bit of food in their crop?
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Okay thanks. In terms of eventually getting them on to solids at which point can I start introducing them to little bits of solid food? And should I be thickening their formula a little bit? I’ve still got it at the tomato sauce consistency
 

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Give them another 2 weeks on formula, you can make the formula slightly thicker. At 3 weeks old, you can start teaching them to eat small seeds. Get a doveseedmixture. Push the seeds around by using your fingers, they will copy what your fingers are doing. Also do the same with a small bowl of water. When they start swallowing the seeds, only give formula in the morning and let them practise eating seeds the rest of the day. At night, if they seem hungry you can give some more formula.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Sorry got another question. When they're near the age where they would usually get kicked out of the nest, is there anything I should do regarding getting them use to moving around more?
 
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