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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious as to what everyone thinks is the best way for a newbe to fly his/her pigeons. Ive been told to try widowhood, or double widowhood, or try natural. I'm totally new, but very capable and learn quick. So any personal thoughts or advice on what everyone thinks a good method for a first time flyer to fly, would be of great help.

Larry Lowell
 

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Personally I am not a fan of widowhood. So far all I've flown in my short tme racing, is natural. But I do plan to try double widowhood...hopefully in 2012 OBs :) I believe in flying hens, not leaving them in the loft as housewives. In regular widowhood, the hens just sit there and look pretty. So you're wasting the chance to fly more potentially great pigeons.
Natural is less work and doesn't require a split loft. But some say you'll never win as much on natural. I think that depends on the person. For every strain/family/bloodline, every loft, every method, country, course, or distance....SOMEONE is kicking butt with/in it. If there was only one way to win, we'd all be winning. So gather up info and input, put together your own ideas, pick the methods you see fit, and try them. If it doesn't work, modify it or try something else! :)
 

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As a first time flyer use the natural system for a season or two until you get the training and health systems understood and organized. You can be competitive with the natural system and it is much less work than any other system. Just easier to try to learn one thing at a time then try to learn 4 or 5 and then not know which one you are doing wrong which is causing the poor results.
 

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Widowhood flying means you need more then one loft,or one big loft...You have to keep the boys and girls apart,and not see each other..In a small loft,it`s impossible...I tried it,and it did nothing for my birds..The same birds,that I clocked in very large long distance racing,did nothing on widowhood....By large races,I mean 1,200 to 1,600 birds in the race..My Natural results in one race was 52nd.....In another 135th...in another 85th and 109th....These were 500 & 600 mile races....Widowhood,no clockings....I have a 8x16 flying loft....8x9 section for yb`s...8x5 for the OB team....Where do I put the hens ??.......Alamo
 

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In my "research" (talking with and reading articles by winning loft managers) I seem to be finding one trend that is consistent in the "winners": the methods are not the most critical factor.

It seems that natural wins, and so does widowhood. Medication wins, so does non-medication. Vitamin v no-vitamin is the same. Garlic, apple cider vinegar, feed patterns/mix, training during race, etc etc. All have advocates on both sides with evidence that their method is best. The only thing that I can really see that is constant is an OCD handler.

What I mean is that the guys/gals who are winning obsess about certain aspects of their loft/bird management. The areas that seem to be the most obsessed over are:
• disease management -- not just preventing but detection
• historical records -- know everything about your birds. EVERYTHING
• time with birds -- I think this is tied to the above but they spend ridiculous amounts of time in the loft (and by ridiculous I mean I am jealous)
• darkening for YB -- molt issues
• less concern about ped -- when selling a bird yes, when breeding no

Beyond those points everything else seems to be highly variable.

They do make one very common point about motivation "The bird must want to come home because they like home. It is up to you to figure out how to make that happen."

Sorry about the rambling. I'm sure there is a point in there.
 

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Just curious as to what everyone thinks is the best way for a newbe to fly his/her pigeons. Ive been told to try widowhood, or double widowhood, or try natural. I'm totally new, but very capable and learn quick. So any personal thoughts or advice on what everyone thinks a good method for a first time flyer to fly, would be of great help.

Larry Lowell
Just curious.........:confused: By seeing your user name, are you using Pigeons to train dogs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I should have stated in my first post. That I will only be racing during the old bird season. I'm a Hunter, and young birds race during the hunting season.

Also my loft is 12 x 10, with windows on each if the 10' sides. The window are a porthole to a 6 x 6 x 6 aviary on each side of my loft. Im in the process of building a dividing wall so I have two separate sides in the loft that would be 6x10. On the back side of my loft I have a double door that will open up to an aviary that will be 12x8. I figure on training and racing days to have the entire loft open so the birds can have a big common area. I figure the aviarys give me room to settle younger birds into the loft, and gave a place to put birds I'm not racing on race days. At this time I have 15 cocks and 10 hens.

Larry Lowell
 

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To you and me it is a race, but to the birds it is the need to get home. So to start with you need a strong, heathy, smart bird that can make it home from the distance while facing all the issues that come up. That you get with breeding, diet, and training. Next you need desire. How to put the desire to get home ASAP. That my friend is the million dollar question.

Tony

Thats great to hear. I am sorry, it was just the user name that made me wonder. I hope I did not offend you. I am sure you understand being being in the Pigeon hobby. If I offend you, PLEASE forgive me.
With a name like LowellsGunDogs and the issues with the use of birds to train birddogs it is an honest question, which LowellsGunDogs answered honestly. Being an old hunder and bird lover I can understand the question and the answer. Now that being said I personally do not think a bird being used to trained birddogs will not win many races. I know I wouldn't be in a hurry to get home if my wife was on the point when I got there.

Tony
 

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I would seperate the sexes (with your divider) If it's not a solid wall put some cardboard or something up so the birds cannot see one another then exercise and train them seperate. Fly them to the perch just like yb's but let them run together for a short while before you basket for the race.
Not opposed to flying natural I've just found thru my own experience that nest birds will not execise around the loft like seperated sexes.
 
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