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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just lost two squabs a couple days ago i'm pretty sure it was a rattsnake. i've herd that moth balls do the trick. my only question is will it hurt my birds if i put it by the nest??? I mean as long as they can't eat it.
 

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Any snake will get Baby birds and the eggs.-Put a wooden egg in the nest if it disappears the snake will die. Not sure about Moth Balls. If a snake swollows a wooden egg in my loft it can not get out---I will find it
 

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Moth balls are toxic to birds. You need to predator proof your loft ASAP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
IT IS PREDATOR PROOF!!!! THE ONLY THING THE SNAKE COULD HAVE GOTTEN THROUGH IS MY 1 INCH CHICKEN WIRE!!! i had a batch of babys like a month ago and they did just fine!!!.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for the advice i think i'll try the wooden eggs. and the moth balls outside thanks.
 

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Any snake will get Baby birds and the eggs.-Put a wooden egg in the nest if it disappears the snake will die. Not sure about Moth Balls. If a snake swollows a wooden egg in my loft it can not get out---I will find it
why will it die and not get out?
 

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They can not "pass" a glass or wooden egg. --In my loft there is no hole large enough for an egg to go through--so the snake with an egg in it can not get back out.
 

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It probably will not pass through their digestive system and the snake will starve to death. Snakes will also swallow plastic poultry eggs and even golf balls that that you leave in a chickens nest. They then crawl away and starve to death because they cannot digest the object. Snakes usually are attracted to these areas because there are rodents nearby. Also any cover the snakes or rodents can hide underneath should be removed, e.g., any lumber piles, pieces of tin or anything they can use for shelter or cover.
 

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A Good List To Have

Protect Your Bird from
Poisons and Toxic Chemicals

Print this Chart as a Reminder of What
Poisonous Plants and Chemicals Can Harm Your Pet Bird


Poisonous Plants that are Harmful to Birds
Amaryllis
Avocado
Azalea
Balsam Pear
Baneberry
Beans: Castor, Horse,
Peas, Navy, Glory
Bird Of Paradise
Black Locust
Blue-Green Algae
Boxwood
Calla Lily
Cherry Tree
Christmas Candle
Coral Plant
Daffodil
Dieffenbachia
Eggplant
Elephant's Ear
Foxglove Hemlock
Holly
Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Indian Turnip
Iris
Ivy ** All Types
Java Bean
Jerusulem Cherry
Jimsonweed
Juniper
Larkspur
Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Locoweed
Marijuana
Mayapple
Mistletoe
Mock Orange
Morning Glory
Narcissus Oak
Oleander
Philodendron
Poison Ivy & Oak
Poinsettia
Pikeweed
Potato
Privet
Rhododendron
Rhubarb
Rosary Peas
Sandbox Tree
Skunk Cabbage
Snowdrop
Sweet Pea
Tobacco
Virginia Creeper
Wisteria
Yam Bean
Yew
Sources of Fumes that are Toxic to Birds
Asbestos
Bleach / Chlorine
Carbon Monoxide
Cigarette Smoke
Diazanon
Flea Bombs and Collars
Floor Polishes
Formaldehyde
Hair Dye and Spray
House Paint
Kerosene
Matches
Moth Balls
Nail Polish & Remover
Oil Paint
Oven Cleaner
Overheated Nonstick
Cookware **Teflons**
Paint Remover
Perfume
Permanent Wave Solution
Pesticides
Shoe Polish and Cleaners
Spot Removers
Spray Starch
Suntan Lotions
Surgical Acrylics
Toilet Cleaners
Wax ***This is by no means
a complete list. If you
are unsure, read the
label, seek more
information from maker.
When in doubt, don't use!!

Emergency Phone Numbers
Regular Vet
24-Hour Vet
Other Emergency Contact
Notes









Protect Your Bird from
Poisons and Toxic Chemicals

Print this Chart as a Reminder of What
Poisonous Plants and Chemicals Can Harm Your Pet Bird


Poisonous Plants that are Harmful to Birds
Amaryllis
Avocado
Azalea
Balsam Pear
Baneberry
Beans: Castor, Horse,
Peas, Navy, Glory
Bird Of Paradise
Black Locust
Blue-Green Algae
Boxwood
Calla Lily
Cherry Tree
Christmas Candle
Coral Plant
Daffodil
Dieffenbachia
Eggplant
Elephant's Ear
Foxglove Hemlock
Holly
Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Indian Turnip
Iris
Ivy ** All Types
Java Bean
Jerusulem Cherry
Jimsonweed
Juniper
Larkspur
Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Locoweed
Marijuana
Mayapple
Mistletoe
Mock Orange
Morning Glory
Narcissus Oak
Oleander
Philodendron
Poison Ivy & Oak
Poinsettia
Pikeweed
Potato
Privet
Rhododendron
Rhubarb
Rosary Peas
Sandbox Tree
Skunk Cabbage
Snowdrop
Sweet Pea
Tobacco
Virginia Creeper
Wisteria
Yam Bean
Yew
Sources of Fumes that are Toxic to Birds
Asbestos
Bleach / Chlorine
Carbon Monoxide
Cigarette Smoke
Diazanon
Flea Bombs and Collars
Floor Polishes
Formaldehyde
Hair Dye and Spray
House Paint
Kerosene
Matches
Moth Balls
Nail Polish & Remover
Oil Paint
Oven Cleaner
Overheated Nonstick
Cookware **Teflons**
Paint Remover
Perfume
Permanent Wave Solution
Pesticides
Shoe Polish and Cleaners
Spot Removers
Spray Starch
Suntan Lotions
Surgical Acrylics
Toilet Cleaners
Wax ***This is by no means
a complete list. If you
are unsure, read the
label, seek more
information from maker.
When in doubt, don't use!!

Emergency Phone Numbers
Regular Vet
24-Hour Vet
Other Emergency Contact
Notes












Protect Your Bird from
Poisons and Toxic Chemicals

Print this Chart as a Reminder of What
Poisonous Plants and Chemicals Can Harm Your Pet Bird


Poisonous Plants that are Harmful to Birds
Amaryllis
Avocado
Azalea
Balsam Pear
Baneberry
Beans: Castor, Horse,
Peas, Navy, Glory
Bird Of Paradise
Black Locust
Blue-Green Algae
Boxwood
Calla Lily
Cherry Tree
Christmas Candle
Coral Plant
Daffodil
Dieffenbachia
Eggplant
Elephant's Ear
Foxglove Hemlock
Holly
Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Indian Turnip
Iris
Ivy ** All Types
Java Bean
Jerusulem Cherry
Jimsonweed
Juniper
Larkspur
Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Locoweed
Marijuana
Mayapple
Mistletoe
Mock Orange
Morning Glory
Narcissus Oak
Oleander
Philodendron
Poison Ivy & Oak
Poinsettia
Pikeweed
Potato
Privet
Rhododendron
Rhubarb
Rosary Peas
Sandbox Tree
Skunk Cabbage
Snowdrop
Sweet Pea
Tobacco
Virginia Creeper
Wisteria
Yam Bean
Yew
Sources of Fumes that are Toxic to Birds
Asbestos
Bleach / Chlorine
Carbon Monoxide
Cigarette Smoke
Diazanon
Flea Bombs and Collars
Floor Polishes
Formaldehyde
Hair Dye and Spray
House Paint
Kerosene
Matches
Moth Balls
Nail Polish & Remover
Oil Paint
Oven Cleaner
Overheated Nonstick
Cookware **Teflons**
Paint Remover
Perfume
Permanent Wave Solution
Pesticides
Shoe Polish and Cleaners
Spot Removers
Spray Starch
Suntan Lotions
Surgical Acrylics
Toilet Cleaners
Wax ***This is by no means
a complete list. If you
are unsure, read the
label, seek more
information from maker.
When in doubt, don't use!!

http://www.multiscope.com/hotspot/poison.htm
 

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People do use moth balls to deture snakes They put them under the loft and such to more or less drive the snake away from the loft Putting them in with the birds could cause problems. Outside the loft Before the snake gets in. You need to look at places a snake can enter the loft they can eveven go up to a small entry to get in I have heard of some type of crystals working to May just be Tick or fire ant crystals I do not remember
 

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IT IS PREDATOR PROOF!!!! THE ONLY THING THE SNAKE COULD HAVE GOTTEN THROUGH IS MY 1 INCH CHICKEN WIRE!!! i had a batch of babys like a month ago and they did just fine!!!.
you need to cover that with 1/4 inch wire... moth balls or not there will be another snake or even a mouse can eat eggs and babies... so that would be a permanant solution to this problem... I had to do it.. a black snake tried to eat one of my adult pigeons sufficating it in the process..he left the body on the floor and was gone, but I knew i had to do something so.. I put the smaller wire up and now my loft is truley preditor proof, and Im soooo much more relaxed because I know that.:)
 

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My flight cage (attached to the loft) is wrapped with 1/4 and 1/2 inch hardware cloth, also about 8 inches under the ground. I still have small "things" (haven't seen them yet, but I find the holes) going under the wire, under the flight cage.
I threw moth balls in the holes (not accessible to my birds) and also threw moth balls and crystals under the building and keep filling in the holes. New one's continue to appear :mad: I've taken the hose and flooded them - no activity for a couple days, then NEW holes.
I have NO idea what it is yet that making these holes because I haven't seen anything yet - other than HOLES!
I also have a couple of neighbors cats that hang around under the loft, sit and watch my birds and have climbed up the side of the flight cage!
I was going to get one of those sensor sprinklers for the cats, BUT, my birds seem to know that the cats can't get to them, so their not even bothered by them anymore. The birds just ignore the cats and go about their usual business, so I think I need the cats around to take care of what's burrowing in the holes!
 

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If the holes are about an inch in diameter they are being made by mice and they will be raising dozen of little babies in these holes. I use to have the same problems in my poultry pens.
 

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IT IS PREDATOR PROOF!!!! THE ONLY THING THE SNAKE COULD HAVE GOTTEN THROUGH IS MY 1 INCH CHICKEN WIRE!!! i had a batch of babys like a month ago and they did just fine!!!.
If you use chicken wire, then it isn't predator proof. Snakes can get in, so can rodents. Rats will kill your birds, and even mice can spread salmonella. You should put up 1/4 inch or 1/2 inch hardware cloth. Then it will be predator proof.
 

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If the holes are about an inch in diameter they are being made by mice and they will be raising dozen of little babies in these holes. I use to have the same problems in my poultry pens.
The holes I have are about 2 inches in diameter - 1 on each side. The only thing I have seen (but not near the flight cage) is some red squirrels running along the fence. The cats are around there everyday and I haven't seen any dead mice from them around.
 

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If those holes are 2 inches diameter, then they're most likely rats or chipmunks. The holes chipmunks make are about that size and smaller. Have you noticed any around?
 

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If those holes are 2 inches diameter, then they're most likely rats or chipmunks. The holes chipmunks make are about that size and smaller. Have you noticed any around?
I haven't "seen" anything! Not even any "trails". The "tell tale" sign for rats is "trails" leading to the holes.
I'm sure those 2 holes are leading to tunnels because when I run the hose into them - the water doesn't come out ANYWHERE!
When I first moved here last year, there were alot of mole tunnels under the lawn.
They can't get inside to the birds - I just don't want them undermining under the flight cage and breeding :eek:
 
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