Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was training my birds today for our last 300. We have a guy in our club that will take everyone’s birds out about 50 miles for a group toss. I made myself available so that I was home when they returned. One group showed up after about an hour and trapped very quickly. The next group showed up about 8 minutes later but did not want to land. It did not take me long before I found out why. There was a Cooper gliding around the area and they were not going to attempt to land as long as he was around. I t took about an hour before the second group was finally able to trap.

It was very interesting to watch the interaction between the older young birds with race experience and the Cooper. They actually seemed to keep following him around at a slightly higher elevation so they knew where he was. He would not try to chase them when they did this. They also tended not to circle around the loft so he wouldn’t know where they wanted to go. When they saw him go into a dive after something else, they bee-lined it to the loft and trapped as quickly as they could. Everyone got in safe this time. When I see behavior like this, it makes me believe that out of natural selection, the BOPs are actually creating smarter pigeons that are adapting to this environmental hazard.

Has anyone seen this type of behavior with their birds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
My birds were loft flying yesterday when my birds started circling a cooper above and below almost at one time like a wagon train after a minute or so the hawk would look at them and finally dived away. Another member of the club had the same thing last week .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts
I was training my birds today for our last 300. We have a guy in our club that will take everyone’s birds out about 50 miles for a group toss. I made myself available so that I was home when they returned. One group showed up after about an hour and trapped very quickly. The next group showed up about 8 minutes later but did not want to land. It did not take me long before I found out why. There was a Cooper gliding around the area and they were not going to attempt to land as long as he was around. I t took about an hour before the second group was finally able to trap.

It was very interesting to watch the interaction between the older young birds with race experience and the Cooper. They actually seemed to keep following him around at a slightly higher elevation so they knew where he was. He would not try to chase them when they did this. They also tended not to circle around the loft so he wouldn’t know where they wanted to go. When they saw him go into a dive after something else, they bee-lined it to the loft and trapped as quickly as they could. Everyone got in safe this time. When I see behavior like this, it makes me believe that out of natural selection, the BOPs are actually creating smarter pigeons that are adapting to this environmental hazard.

Has anyone seen this type of behavior with their birds?


This is awesome!
I wonder how/where do they lean these skills, if let's say it's their first encounter with the predator. The natural selection you are referring to, is in only certain pigeons?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
They have a built in perception when there's hawks in the area,even when they're not flying.Last year I was at my young bird loft observing the birds inside.A hawk was circling above and there was no way the birds could see it,but they all looked up at the roof at the same time and got nervous.I guess Mother Nature gave them that built in perception to danger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts
I don't race my pigeons. But this year i had a hawk landing 2 meters in front of the aviary on the first branch of the tree. The ones that were in the aviary within seconds got inside. That's when i looked to see what;s the reason. It was a young hawk. I went inside to see how they behave, since it's the first time for them to see a hawk, and they were all alligned on the perches, including the ones who didn't see the hawk. I stood by them for at least half an hour ( i start cleaning because i got bored looking at them)...all this time they were soundless and not moving at all.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,342 Posts
We do not have problems in NZ with BOP, It is incredibly rare to see a falcon and harrier hawks which is all we have down where I am do not catch flying healthy pigeons. Although instictively the birds are still very wary.

They do exactly what you have described, Get above and behind the bird and they fly in an S bend motion just behind the hawk, almost like they are driving it away. I love it when hawks fly over as it gets the birds up for a good fly, Doesn't happen much though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I once let my birds out in the desert when I lived in Southern California. I hadn't thought about hawks until after I let loose the birds on a training toss. They went straight up and high right pass and above the hawks circling above. I watched in amazement how quickly they got above the predators then headed for home.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top