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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some advice...

I still have my four white homers. They're basically pets now. I didn't think they were mating yet. I went to my parents to farm-sit for a week and my husband took care of them for a week. I came back and my 07 hen had two eggs. Well, I wasn't expecting eggs yet, so I didn't have nests or nesting material ready. Under advice from some other homer people, today I got a bowl and some bedding. I cleaned the hutch (which is what the parents chose for their "area"), gave them some bedding and put the eggs into a nice big bowl with some bedding. I watched the female and she jumped right up on the bowl after I put her eggs in. Seemed like she accepted it fine. After that I fed everyone like normal and she flew out to eat. Since then she hadn't seemed like she's interested in setting on the eggs. I kept checking back and she's near the eggs, but not on them. I'm guessing both eggs have been laid for roughly 2-3 days. Is it normal for her to not be on the eggs all the time? What about the dad? I've NEVER seen him attempt to stay with the hen or the eggs. Do I have a pair of bad parents? I know this is their first batch of eggs. I need some experienced voices here.
 

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Do they have their own nestbox with their eggs in the bowl?

If they dont have a nestbox you have to contain them in one so they will know that they have some eggs to sit-on and incubate them...I don't think they're bad parents just not ready to set-in and stay in the bowl, I think some of the young parents-to-be tends to lay eggs and stay outside the bowl...I'm just fortunate that I have some pair that can incubate the eggs in case the other pairs don't want to sit on them...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I have room with a pigeon hutch in it. The birds free fly, but I use the hutch for penning if one of the birds is getting picked on. The hutch is about 3 ft wide, 2 ft deep and 2ft high. The pair choose the hutch for their eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
if they are not sitting on the egg after 3 days they are not going to sit on them and I would remove them .
She was setting on them this morning. I hope I didn't disrupt her too much. She just didn't seem too interested in them to begin with though. Like she does keep them close when she's setting. She's usually only setting on 1 1/2 eggs.
 

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sometimes they lay them but they don't sit on them for some reason. i'm not an expert, but that's happened to me. i get so excited when they lay eggs, but sometimes it's always not successful. they might need to experience once or twice before they be successful. but idk. so yea!!
 

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That happened to me once. A hen laid an egg on the floor. Being thoughtful I put a bowl and bedding on the floor at the same spot and transferred the egg. My hen may have realized something because she didn't sit on them after that. I am supposing that happens because she is young.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, if they abandon this batch how long until they try again?
 

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i put straw on the floor abit and then also fill a bowl for her n put the eggs in it because if she didnt like the straw she wouldnt eat and she would have to deal with that herself and eventually would come down then probally notice its nothing and go back on her nest
 

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putting the eggs in the bowl might of thrown her off, they don't like change...if you have the room for more babies, just take the eggs if she is not sitting, and then up the calcium and give vitamins, and leave the bowl in where they laid the first two and she should lay again in the bowl, the cock needs to like the spot as well, they really do need their own spot that he can defend and drive the hen to. so that hutch may have to be their nest box, the bowl should have someting in it like sand and shavings and get them some pine needles to add themselves...her being an 07 hen I would of thought she would of layed eggs by now....has she been paired up with this male the whole time you have had her?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
putting the eggs in the bowl might of thrown her off, they don't like change...if you have the room for more babies, just take the eggs if she is not sitting, and then up the calcium and give vitamins, and leave the bowl in where they laid the first two and she should lay again in the bowl, the cock needs to like the spot as well, they really do need their own spot that he can defend and drive the hen to. so that hutch may have to be their nest box, the bowl should have someting in it like sand and shavings and get them some pine needles to add themselves...her being an 07 hen I would of thought she would of layed eggs by now....has she been paired up with this male the whole time you have had her?
I am just guessing she was a virgin when I got her. I found her and the male she's mating with SMASHED in with some chickens at a barnyard swap. The guy that had them didn't know squat about pigeons, some older guy just gave them to him. I had already gotten my "trial pair" of '08 white homers from a respectable breeder at the swap, but couldn't leave those two behind. Since they didn't immediately show any signs of knowing how to "do it" I assumed they were virgin. Also, they came to me VERY stressed and fearful, so I'm pretty sure they weren't in a quiet enough environment at the chicken place to settle down and breed.

And she has been seeming to pair off with this male the whole time I've had her.
 

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I am just guessing she was a virgin when I got her. I found her and the male she's mating with SMASHED in with some chickens at a barnyard swap. The guy that had them didn't know squat about pigeons, some older guy just gave them to him. I had already gotten my "trial pair" of '08 white homers from a respectable breeder at the swap, but couldn't leave those two behind. Since they didn't immediately show any signs of knowing how to "do it" I assumed they were virgin. Also, they came to me VERY stressed and fearful, so I'm pretty sure they weren't in a quiet enough environment at the chicken place to settle down and breed.

And she has been seeming to pair off with this male the whole time I've had her.
ok, so maybe she has just found her groove with your good care...if you want to have more pigeons by letting them hatch some....they would be breeders now and give them extra calcium and vitamins, they need more protein in the diet to raise a family and a quiet spot to do so...give them a nest bowl and stuff to make a nest...if you do not want babies just replace the eggs with your wooden ones, if you don't have any, buy some:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm giving them crushed oyster shells with their grit and putting vitamins in their water. Is that enough?
 

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I'm giving them crushed oyster shells with their grit and putting vitamins in their water. Is that enough?
depends if they are eating the oystershell, with breeding, I would add a suppliment to the water and give a at least 17% protein in the feed, the bag of pigeon feed should have the protein content on the bag, if you want to add protein chicken layer mash can be added to the seed, slowly for them to get used to it and leave feed for them all the time in their spot not far from the nest, it only takes a sec to get some water so no need to put that in there too...:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
depends if they are eating the oystershell, with breeding, I would add a suppliment to the water and give a at least 17% protein in the feed, the bag of pigeon feed should have the protein content on the bag, if you want to add protein chicken layer mash can be added to the seed, slowly for them to get used to it and leave feed for them all the time in their spot not far from the nest, it only takes a sec to get some water so no need to put that in there too...:)
I'll check the protein content. I never see any left over oyster shells, so I think they're eating it. They leave lots of grit, but I never see them leave the shells. So, I'm thinking that is a good thing.

By the way, I LOVE the frillback in your siggy. GORGEOUS!
 

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I'll check the protein content. I never see any left over oyster shells, so I think they're eating it. They leave lots of grit, but I never see them leave the shells. So, I'm thinking that is a good thing.

By the way, I LOVE the frillback in your siggy. GORGEOUS!
Thanks! I will be hatching some from them early spring.....Im going to add the calcium syrup now so they will be set for when they feed babies the crop milk will be good quaility from adding that....:)
 
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I was wondering if you have any type of next box in there to keep the pairs apart ?? I agree with spirit that they dont like change and putting the eggs in a bowl after they are layed will cause a pair to abandon the eggs ,some pairs dont mind but many do :eek: If you have room in your hutch I would just make some make shift nest boxes out of cardboard boxes with a small opening to enter thru for them like this guy did and when they get thru raising the babys you can just replace them ,should work fine til you can build your bigger loft ;)
heres what this guy wrote about them ...>
Just a quick photo showing the birds at rest and play. Contrary to what you might expect, there are never any eggs broken by the additional pairs as the boxes are only accessible through the opening in the center that is cut to allow one bird in at a time 4"x4"(homers a lil larger). The pairs quickly pick out a box and go about their own business. There is no opportunity for the neighbors to pick a fight as the ledge is non-existent. As there is no space between the boxes a better time is had by all.

I originally got my boxes from the local supermarket. The soap and water boxes are about the most sturdy and hold up well. You might have to take a utility knife and custom fit some of the boxes but the time involved will pay-off immensely. Take care to cut the opening for the birds in the center and about one inch up. At first I used the regular paper bowl but the birds ignored them and started bringing in sticks and grass to make their own nest. Taking a cue from my new residents I placed about one inch of fresh cut grass in each box. My concern with this at first was that I might end up with squabs with "spread leg". As soon as the youngsters hatched and produced dropping a nice round nest was soon made and not one bird has come out with a problem. (It is now August 4, 2001 and I have not used one nest bowl in eight months). When the birds are old enough I place them on the wire flooring and the parents lay again. After two rounds I empty the box and place more fresh grass in the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That's a GREAT idea! I'm gonna go make some right now!! I'm still mourning the loss of the first eggs. I was so dumb to put them in a bowl! The homer folks seemed to think it would be just fine. I shouldn't have listened to them. :(

Thanks for the advice!!
 
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yeah pigeons are funny when you mess with their nests they really dont like things messed with ,but when the babys are older(say two weeks and more) they seem to recognise them no matter how much they are messed with but before that they like their privacy alot. anyways at least you will know for the next time :)
 

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Lokotaloft,

I am very impress with that resourcefulness! You don't mine if I copy that idea on my loft?

rod
 
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