Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 20 of 87 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there. I finally got in contact with an avian vet who is dedicating to pigeons!

We talked about the possibilities of my pijjies. He told me that my city was a great place for release, but just not IN the city. We have many rural areas around it where my birds would be able to find food. But he told me that the worst thing I could do for them is to release them inside the city. He told me that the pigeon breeders here kinda hate ferals (like I guessed) and that he recommended that. He said that they'd learn fast and that they don't have natural predators in the rural areas (which is true. Chimangos are mostly scavengers, and they prefer mice to birds... no cats... dogs have little time for such things...). He also said that birds in the city carry many diseases for which birds living in that atmosphere become immune, but that these birds are completely clean and haven't been properly exposed to such climates. In the rural areas there is plenty of food, too.

He told me that I had done a good job (thanks to you!) in the preventive treatment, but he recommended me to go again with the metronidazole (what is the exact dosage? I have 500mg pills of it. I need to weigh my birds but I'll do that later) because I hadn't treated one of the birds and they are in contact. He also recommended me to start on vitamins. I didn't buy vitamins because I didn't know which to pick (because there were so many different mixes) but he told me which ones I should use.

I'll wait for my second bird to have all his feathers (he's still missing some) and then release.

What do you think about this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,047 Posts
How will they know how to find natural food? You can't expect to just take them to the rural country, let them go and then expect them to survive. Pigeons in the wild are taught the ways of the wild, by their parents and these don't have that privilege.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I assume they'll learn first by imitation and second because the natural food is quite similar to the one they eat here. Dunno, that's what the guy told me. He told me to release next to a field where grains are produced or when I found a flock.
They're smart birds, I never actually showed them how to eat or what was food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
But you put it in front of them. That's all they know. They have no idea how to find it, and wouldn't recognize it if they did. I have rescues in my loft, because they either were let out, or escaped, and didn't make it back to their loft. They were half starved and near death because they had food all around them and had absolutely no idea that it was even there. When a bird is raised by people, and provided their food, they have never learned how or where to find it. Instinct doesn't carry them far. And they have no idea about predators, or even that there ARE predators. And I don't care what that guy told you. Hawks are everywhere. And that is only one of many things that would be glad to kill those birds. He is wrong. You are putting your birds in a situation where they cannot win. I could take my whole loft full of birds and release them next to a field full of grain, and they would all likely die of starvation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Um... but my birds are ferals. And I picked them up as older birds, while yours probably have been living in captivity for all their lives. They were 20+ days. They see the grains in the grass and pick them up. I made sure of that because first when I wanted to release them I tried to see if they did. What is it that they don't know how to find? I kinda don't see the difference, sorry. (It's not that I don't want to believe it but that I truly don't understand, don't think I'm underestimating you or what you say).

We live in different parts of the world. You can't say hawks are everywhere because you haven't been here. We don't have as many species, and locally it's what we have. Again, they're are mostly scavengers, and I believe they will learn... right? Or how do birds that haven't been exposed to hawks (because we don't have chimangos everywhere) live? That's some of the stuff I don't understand.

I believed he was a trustful source of information since he's been in the field for years :(. Apparently not.

Ok, if you're confident they won't make it (but you have to be at least 50% sure), I can keep them. What is more, I'd love to keep them. I love pigeons and I'd love to have them as pets. When I said they were non-releasable, I thought I was taking the decision half because of the arguments exposed in the thread half because of my own selfishness. I thought they'd be happier there. But my family won't be happy at all, they thought they had "gotten rid" of them x.x. Not saying that was an impediment, but... they won't understand why they aren't releasable even if they are explained.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I think that your birds will do just fine once released. They are wild birds. They instinctively know how to find food and avoid predators Do the right thing and release them asap.
 
G

·
i think they can learn to live in the wild but you just cant expect them to do so by throwing them out there without any other pigeons to guide them to where the food supply is .. the parents and flockmates really do show them the way in the reguards to instincts of survival out in the real world .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
Do you have flocks of pigeons nearby?
 
G

·
I'm not going to throw them in the middle of nowhere O.O
I'm planning to find a flock first and release them with that flock. This vet told me they wouldn't have any problem accepting the birds.
if the flocks arent near you and you let them go where the flocks are its pretty much the same thing as throwing them out in the middle of nowhere :eek: you have to be sure they are integrating into the flock first ..just wanted to point out that when a strange pigeon comes down with my flock my birds tend to keep their distance for a good while before warming up to them .
 
G

·
if you can get the wild ones to come around it would prolly be the best way to integrate your birds into the wild being that they can always come back to you for eatting purposes and protection ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
if you can get the wild ones to come around it would prolly be the best way to integrate your birds into the wild being that they can always come back to you for eatting purposes and protection ;)
Somebody over the other thread I created for deciding if I would release them or not told me pigeons don't do that o_O

That's what I wanted to do in first place. But I've been having no luck probably for a month x.x
 
G

·
babys learn alot thru flock mentality , they like to follow the leader what they see they then do and learn from it .. thats why other older wild birds are a must when letting your youngins go to learn from .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
I have a feral flock that comes to my yard, so if I were to do a soft release of a couple of pigeons into that flock, it would take time. And I would keep a shelter for them with food and water for as long as it took them to be able to learn to live wild. They would know where to go for food if they needed to. Then hopefully, eventually, they wouldn't need to come back to me for food. It's a transition. Not just putting them out and expecting them to be able to forage on their own. They have to learn, and that takes time. That way, you are still there for them as long as they need you to be. You hope that eventually, they won't need you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Would they learn even at older ages?

If I go there and find a flock, how many times should they meet them while caged to consider releasing them? Should I go there every day and feed them?

I don't know, this seems kinda complicated. It's all what I wanted to do in the beginning, but this doesn't seem possible.

Over all, what do you think would be best FOR THE BIRDS? Flock (in the conditions I have), pets, or take them to some loft? I'm afraid they'll just cull them at a loft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,333 Posts
i would release where you are also, city piji's are just as hardy as rural ones, and if they know where to come for consistent food and water everyday, which you put out for them.
they will rely on that food supply while they figure out how to survive out there, do your best to make sure they don't like people too much, that's one thing that can get them in trouble once freed.
i know alot of people on the board believe a hand raised piji should never be released, but i feel differently, i know some survive, i can't say all do, but i know some do because they visit for food on occasion and i have banded them and seen them with different flocks around the city.
that is what wildlife rehabilitation is, we don't raise pets, we help them get through whatever trouble they got into and the goal is to get them back to the wild as soon as they are ready.
if i kept every orphan i raised i would have hundreds of birds as pets, including a couple hundred seagulls (what a nightmare that would be!! so messy sooo stinky, and what a racket they would make, my neighbors would run me out of town).
i know some probably didn't make it, but i know a lot did, if they were all doomed to a certain death i would stop what i'm doing today, what would be the point, and i could have my summers back and live like a normal person again.
i do think support feeding is the most important thing you can do for them.
you need to be sure they are fully weaned and eating, in perfect feather and are strong flyers.
they need to have appropriate fear of people and domestic animals, if you have a cat or dog that they have no fear of they will be doomed for sure.
i did send you some spartix that treats canker.
i see no reason to treat them unless they are showing symptoms of it
 
1 - 20 of 87 Posts
Top