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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a picture of my family of homers, the father is the one furthest to the left, Here are his 2010 young babies all grown up. The fist and second rounds of babies. There are two cock birds and two hen birds. The first batch consist of the one that looks similar to his father and the yellowish hen. The two black ones are nest mates. Each of the rounds had a male and female. Unfortunately their mother (black color) flew away when the black round was just around three weeks.
 

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The two on the left are, as far as I can tell :) Or perhaps just the one in the front on the left (because I can see the tailbar is missing).
The brown looking bird in the front looks like a silver opal. Or maybe just some sort of bronze on the silver.
 

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Guardian Angel
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The two on the left are, as far as I can tell :) Or perhaps just the one in the front on the left (because I can see the tailbar is missing).
The brown looking bird in the front looks like a silver opal. Or maybe just some sort of bronze on the silver.
Hi BECKY,I have been looking at these birds for over an hour. The two on the left are Indigo as the bird in the corner is the father of the two birds up front.The one that you think might be brown ,I think it realy is an Indigo that is showing pale and that would explain the golden bornze color on the brest of that hen. Pale is a rare gene and very hard to come by. This is another case of the cock needing to be **** for pale to show it. I would love to have those birds in my loft just to play around with color.GEORGE;)
 

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She isn't brown afterall. She's silver. I agree with george then, probably a silver indigo with pale. Or can dilute efffect the bronze like that too? In that case, the pale may not have been needed?
Does she have a tail bar?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Is indigo a rare color, and is it a dominate color because I know I bred her father to a white hen two years back and they had a young bird that looked a lot like the father, and just last year I bred him to a black hen and it created those babies, so to me it looks like the color the father is, is a quite dominate color.
 

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Guardian Angel
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Hi Pigeon X,You must understand that INDIGO is not a color but is modifing gene that affects color.(Autosomal color affecting genes) some of the genes that affect color are
  1. GRIZZLE
  2. SPREAD
  3. RECESSIVE RED
  4. RECESSIVE OPAL
  5. DOMINANT OPAL
  6. MILKY
  7. SMOKEY
  8. INDIGO
  9. ALBINO
  10. PINK-EYED DILUTE
  11. GAZZI
  12. PEARL EYE
    THERE 3 SEX LINKED GENE THAT ALSO AFFECT COLOR THEY ARE DILUTION,PALE, AND REDUCED
[/LIST]All these gene are not color but they all affect color and you can have 2 or 3 at work at the same time
GEORGE;)
 

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Indigo is dominant. But like George said, it is a modifier. It just changes the way blues, ash-reds, and browns look. In combination with other genes, it also changes the way they would normally look. Blue indigos are my favorites, but really I like indigo in any of its forms, including andalusian (spread indigo).
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Wow, that is very neat, that means that there are many colors and morphs that pigeons can be. The reason I really enjoy raising pigeons is the different colors they come in. Thanks for showing me how there are many forms of colors they can be breed to. I was just wondering why is it pigeons that are the only wild surviving birds that come in so many different colors and morphs, you should think that they would eventually all look similar to one another but some how in the wild, there is always some that have odd colors, such a fascinating topic.
 
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