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Discussion Starter #1
A recent rescue arrived with dual nematode infections -- it was passing both Spirurid and Trichuris (whipworm) eggs.

What is a safe and effective treatment for whipworm in pigeons?

The long version...
The Spiruirids were easily dewormed with Moxidectin. I follow Collin Walker's methodology of Moxidectin in drinking water for two days, which is superior to periodic oral dosing, as the worms are repeatedly bathed in the drug throughout the day when the birdy drinks the medicated water. I use Quest brand Moxidectin by Fort Dodge, which is supplied as a gel in an equine calibrated dosing syringe. You can purchase it at Tractor Supply, animal feed stores, etc. You formulate a solution of the drug by dispensing 0.5 mL of Quest gel into 1 liter of water, and shake vigorously to dissolve the gel (a magnetic bar laboratory stirrer is superior if you have access to one). The water must be supplied to the bird for a full 48-hour period, more if the animal is still showing signs of infection, which is predominatly evidenced by passing undigested seed.

Conversely I have not been able to eliminate the whipworm infection. The bird is passing lots of Trichuris eggs, as well as lots of undigested seed. The Moxidectin did not kill the whipworms, so I next tried Pyrantel Pamoate on two successive days at a high dose (Mediworm tablet by Medpet of South Africa, 20 mg Pyrantel Pamoate plus Praziquantel). The Pyrantel seemed to work at first -- within hours the bird stopped passing undigested seed in her droppings. But by the next day, she was again passing seed in her poop. I repeated the Pyrantel, had the same response of the stopping the seed in the poop, but then the seed-in-poop reappeared by the next day.

Our local SPCA wildlife department has been wonderfully supportive, but they would deworm the bird with Panacur (Fenbendazole). I am aware of a large body of literature that confirms Fenbendazole causes leucopenia and idiopathic liver disease in Columbiformes like pigeons and doves. I treated this bird for an Eimeria coccidia infection, and she is severely wasted with significant chest muscle loss, so I do not want to expose her to a potentially deadly deworming treatment.

Are any of the other benmidizole dewormers, such as Oxibendazole, Albendazole, Mebendazole, etc. any safer to use on a pigeon? I know Vetafarm sells a pigeon product that contains Oxfendazole which is a salt of Fenbedazole, but do not know about the safety profile of that product.

I am also aware that some people ued Diatomaceous Earth as either a dewormer or parasitic worm control, but I have no experience in this regard.

Suggestions? I would like to buy a product and treat this little lady as soon as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Is Imidacloprid safe in pigeons?

Has anyone tried deworming a pigeon with Imidacloprid? I see that Bayer Animal Health has a veterinary product named "Advocate" for treating nematode infections. It contains imidacloprid + moxidectin. I do not know of Imidacloprid has a better safety profile than Fenbendazole in pigeons.
 

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I have treated with diatomaceous earth, but it is ongoing, but it works. I give it to my dog daily.

I won't use it for my birds though. The problem is you have to get them to eat it and it is easily airborne, so use very sparingly as you do not want to get it in eyes or in their lungs.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
Imidacloprid cannot be used to treat birds

Just found this:
"Imidacloprid is toxic to upland game and birds especially Japanese quail, house sparrow, canary and pigeons. So toxic is imidacloprid to birds that the EPA concluded that the ‘levels of concern’ for secondary exposures were exceeded for both non-endangered and endangered songbirds. [Cox, C. 2001. Factsheet: Imidacloprid. J. of Pesticide Reform Vol.21(1).] Imidacloprid causes abnormal behavior, such as lack of coordination, lack of responsiveness and an inability to fly, in birds for which it is not considered highly toxic, such as mallards. Other adverse effects observed include eggshell thinning (at exposures of 61mg/kg), decreased weight (at exposures of 150 ppm) in food) and reduced egg production and hatching success. Imidacloprid also appears to repel birds when used as a seed treatment."
[Beyond Pesticides, 701 E Street SE #200 Washington, DC 20003
(202) 543-5450 | www.beyondpesticides.org]
 
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