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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hi everyone, i just got back from the vet with a feral that was awaiting spring release.
she had been feeling down and when i checked her yesterday he abdomen was full of fluids.
we did a couple of xrays and pulled out some fluid, my vet suspected egg yolk peritonitis and i e-mailed the xrays out to tufts wildlife center and they confirmed it.
they also said it was pretty bad they couldn't see her air sacks and her lungs were being compressed by the fluid.
they thought i should euthanize, but my gut is telling me "not yet"
can this bird recover without surgery??
if she can recover will this be a chronic problem for her making a her release certain death??
i have started her on baytril and metacam.
she is in some respiratory distress but not too bad yet, i can tell she feels like crap, fluffing and wings hanging.
but she is still spunky, she hates me, lol and will coo, circle and bite me if i put my hand in near her
am i delaying the inevitable??
this a problem i have never seen in a wildbird, nor has any of the other rehabbers i have spoken with.
any advice would be appreciated
i'll try to attach the xrays for you all to look at
 

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OMG, those rads look AWFUL!! There's so much fluid that you can't see anything. Did they drain off as much as they could?
I have not heard of any good prognosis' for egg yoke peritonitis - but don't go by me! I commend you for hanging in there with her, the poor thing :(
Other than euthanasia, did the vet have any suggestions for antibiotics? I think I would bombard her with antibiotics - long term (if they didn't give you any suggestions) just to see if it would help.
I'm going to check something - so I'll be back
 

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I found this -
"Egg peritonitis can make your bird very sick and is difficult to treat. It has much better results if caught early. There are good treatments now around for egg peritonitis and some birds do make a full recovery. Treatment involves using a diuretic like Frusemide to clear away the fluid and drugs like Milk Thistle to help the liver repair itself plus antibiotics to prevent further infection"
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
he drained off a couple of cc's mostly to see what it was.
baytril and metacam is what is suggested for the milder cases, i'm so sad
it may be too late for her
 

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Actually...I am using a diuretic on a rescue chicken with egg peritonitis ...Jodi, I forgot to tell you that. The problem still persists and I take her in to be drained. The time between draining is becoming more frequent.
The reason vets and rehabbers haven't seen this problem in wild birds is because if the do come down with it, hey just die and no one knows.
I suspect there is a direct link to lack of Vitamin D.
 

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It's...furosemide.
 

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he drained off a couple of cc's mostly to see what it was.
baytril and metacam is what is suggested for the milder cases, i'm so sad
it may be too late for her
Altgirl35, I have had only one bird that had fluids accumulate in the abdomen, paracentesis was done, the removal of accumulated fluids by a larger gage syringe, and 25cc of fluids was removed. Just taking out a few cc's is not going to help much I think in removing the pressure from the internal organs. If the fluid can readily be drained, I would think it would be wise drain some more. One thing the vet will have to take into consideration is the possibility of hypovolemic shock for the bird, this can happen sometimes if too much fluid is drained at once, my vet explained to me, with my bird, he did not completly drain all the fluid for this reason.

My bird was on furosemide as well as TMP/SMX, plus metronidazole. Once the fluids were drained it was like a night and day difference in him. Hopefully by draining and aggressive antibiotic treatment there is always the possibility of recovery.

Good luck with her,

Karyn
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
oh thank you all sooo much!!! it's so nice to have hope for her, my gut was telling me not to euthenize her yet.
i will call the vet first thing in the morning and try to get her in right away.
now, will this be a chronic problem for her in the future???
 

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Dobato's information is very good and thats what my vet did as well and if the bird makes it one never knows if it will be an ongoing problem but if it happens again they can give you hormones to put a shot into the muscle of the breast and this helps to stop the bird from ovulation for new batch of eggs coming across to the oviduct tube. I had two I tried to save with my vet but it was to no avail and each time they drain the fluid they can.t drain too much because it then messes with its electrolytes and minerals and stuff like that and that in itself will kill the bird....Best wishes in trying...c.hert
 

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oh thank you all sooo much!!! it's so nice to have hope for her, my gut was telling me not to euthenize her yet.
i will call the vet first thing in the morning and try to get her in right away.
now, will this be a chronic problem for her in the future???

More than likely so. The surgery would be the best. Did Tufts tell you what the cost would be?
 

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oh thank you all sooo much!!! it's so nice to have hope for her, my gut was telling me not to euthenize her yet.
i will call the vet first thing in the morning and try to get her in right away.
now, will this be a chronic problem for her in the future???
I am hoping she is able to recover, but at least you will know you gave it your best try if she does not. I would imagine that this being chronic would depend on what caused it in the first place, if it is bacterial in nature, there is a good chance I think that the antibiotics could solve things, if it's organ related, a determination would have to be made on her prognosis and if there is a course of treatment that could solve it. If Pidgey sees this thread, it would be good to hear what he thinks.

Karyn
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
tufts didn't say and i didn't ask, they know she is wildlife, and to bring your pet for treatment at the animal hosp is very very expensive.
i will talk to my vet about it.
the fluid he did pull out was super thick opaque and yellowish(and ya gross!), it may be hard to pull a lot out anyways
 

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I am hoping she is able to recover, but at least you will know you gave it your best try if she does not. I would imagine that this being chronic would depend on what caused it in the first place, if it is bacterial in nature, there is a good chance I think that the antibiotics could solve things, if it's organ related, a determination would have to be made on her prognosis and if there is a course of treatment that could solve it. If Pidgey sees this thread, it would be good to hear what he thinks.

Karyn
The old eggs and infection surrounding them need to be cleaned out and the area flushed. Of course at this point there is a lot of bacteria.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
okay, i'm taking her to the vet at 11 to remove some of the fluid to buy her some time, he's going to look into the surgery and let me know the cost ect..
 

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GReat! Will be waiting to hear. Good luck!
 

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That's good news!
 
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