Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not a pigon fancier, though I love to watch them and there are a pair of collared doves nesting in my garden.

I work with really nice man who did not learn to read and write as a child - he is in his 60s now and I am helping him. His passion is his racing pigeons and I thought I could find some good stories here to download for him to read.

I found an article on another site about using the widowhood method of training, and we used that last week, but he uses a different method where he flies his hens and his cocks, I think alternately. If anyone could be kind enough to write a few sentences about how that works, I would really appreciate it and so would he.

This week he will be reading Birdy's article about training pigons. I look forward to getting to know you better and to finding out more about these intelligent and beautiful birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
OK, I agree with this idea except, he also may be a source of information. So when ya'll get together again, we like to know; what type of pigeons he has, how many, how long he been in it, and to ensure he knows he is welcomed to the site because he has been missed, (post pictures if you can).

Now if you look at the stickys in the beginning, they cover a range of topics. Pick one of his choosing, read it, then let us hear his ideas with a new thread. This will start the the conversation and then the fun begins. People here are very nice and have their opinions, which makes it a great site for him to read and share.

God Bless and welcome,
Tony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,536 Posts
I am not a pigon fancier, though I love to watch them and there are a pair of collared doves nesting in my garden.

I work with really nice man who did not learn to read and write as a child - he is in his 60s now and I am helping him. His passion is his racing pigeons and I thought I could find some good stories here to download for him to read.

I found an article on another site about using the widowhood method of training, and we used that last week, but he uses a different method where he flies his hens and his cocks, I think alternately. If anyone could be kind enough to write a few sentences about how that works, I would really appreciate it and so would he.

This week he will be reading Birdy's article about training pigons. I look forward to getting to know you better and to finding out more about these intelligent and beautiful birds.
Well, I think this is a terrific idea and commend you for helping this gentleman. We're NEVER too old to learn.
I think maybe he flies a Double Widowhood system? You might ask him about that.
The difference in Widowhood and Double Widowhood is this:
Widowhood.......only the cocks are flown. The hens remain at home and are always there when the cock returns.
Double Widowhood: Both sexes are flown.......usually the races have a "A" race and a "B" race and they are liberated about 1/2 hour to an hour apart. Most people put the hens in the first race, (the A race) and the cocks in the second race (the B race).....so that in theory.....the hens arrive home first, trap into the loft and go to their nest box and shortly there after, the cocks arrive home and find their mate waiting for them.
Good luck with your undertaking and tell this man that we would LOVE to hear HIS stories.........maybe you should teach him to type while your at it. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
I had a classmate once back in college who was 80 years old trying to get a college degree. She can't stand up without help, but was dedicated. She got that degree with us all standing cheering. With that I rather teach that old man how to read and write. At 60, he probably can still learn. I met our forum member George Simon and that guy is still sharp at his age!

Now there are some software that can read articles for you and recites it. I think microsoft may have one. Linux has one, too. I think they are called text to speech software.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all. We tried to look at this forum in the education Centre where I see Ray, but their computer security system would not allow us to access "chat rooms". Ray has been keeping pigeons for 50 years. He has 48 birds. I am going to find out more about them and also if there are an questions he would like to ask or information he would like me to pass on.

I know he places a lot of emphasis on correct basket training of young birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Hi Welshchick
I live in Australia we tend to train our birds here as he does hen and cock seperate normaly cocks are trained in the morning hens in the afternoon the reason to training this way is cocks race better over short races and the hens over more distance as the birds tend to race later into the day over the longer distances the thought of being feed is stronger thus the hens will keep coming and race better knowing its nearly feed time this also helps when I start to drop the feeding time back to late night and train the birds in the dark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
I know he places a lot of emphasis on correct basket training of young birds.
So how does he do correct basket training?
First week loft fly.
Second week one mile from the loft, north west south then east.
Third week five miles.
Four week ten miles.

How far out does he train?

Does he have a few old birds to show the young birds the way home or does he only train the young?

Does he release the whole group at one time or small groups?

How about releasing single birds five minutes apart?

Now print this page and let him read it. Sounds like we can learn from an old pro, glad to have you on board.

God Bless,
Tony
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top