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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All!

I have received a new rescue today, a beautiful pigeon that the family named "Cher Ami" after the famous military pigeon!

Anyway.... as soon as I saw her I suspected PMV, I have never seen or experienced a pigeon with it but obviously during the last 2 months with Xena I have been studying! She (? maybe? Who knows) is fully grown I think, and I weighed her (she feels tiny!) and she's 256g.

Anyway... for now, she's in a cage, with a hot water bottle and a few perches. She has water (away from the perches so she can't fall over into them I hope) and seeds. I gave her peas but her beak just seems so small and she can't pick them up. I tried to help her but she just spat them out.

So my question is for you PMV pros. What's the protocol? I know I have to be scrupulously clean and not cross contaminate with my other rescue (Cher PMV is in the bathroom, far away from Xena the other pidge... but is there any medicine or supplement or specific care you recommend? She is able to stand, she can't fly, but she can kinda do big hops with assisted wing flaps to get to her low perches. She is twisting her neck a lot, and has a slight head tremor when she's still. She is currently perching on one foot so she has some stability.

Checked her mouth and throat, no sign of canker! Looks healthy allover.
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Much like treating xena, the first course of action is supportive. From there the jury is still out.

I have a relationship with 15 other bird rescuers. We are not all in agreement over antibiotics though. When I suspect PMV I ALWAYS give supportive care with antibiotics (either trimethoprim or baytril). Half of my resue friends will criticise me for using antibiotic saying its unnecessary, the other half agree with my use of antibiotic. We have working relationships with 5 different Vets; also with differing opinions. I hate to lose, so I go with the nutrition, hygiene, medicine. PMV sometimes leaves permanent neurological damage , but PMV also lowers the ability of the immune system to fight off opportunistic bacteria.

Whatever course of action you choose, thanks for caring for this little soul
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Much like treating xena, the first course of action is supportive. From there the jury is still out.

I have a relationship with 15 other bird rescuers. We are not all in agreement over antibiotics though. When I suspect PMV I ALWAYS give supportive care with antibiotics (either trimethoprim or baytril). Half of my resue friends will criticise me for using antibiotic saying its unnecessary, the other half agree with my use of antibiotic. We have working relationships with 5 different Vets; also with differing opinions. I hate to lose, so I go with the nutrition, hygiene, medicine. PMV sometimes leaves permanent neurological damage , but PMV also lowers the ability of the immune system to fight off opportunistic bacteria.

Whatever course of action you choose, thanks for caring for this little soul
What dosage of baytril do you give? Xena is still on it for salmonella and the vet was happy to prescribe. Xena is 5mg once a day.

Ive never had an older pigeon before. Does she need grit? I have seeds for her, but she won't touch the peas or corn I've put out. She seems to be eating well but her tiny little beak struggles with the bigger seeds.

Thanks so much!!!
 

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I've only cared for 1 PMV pigeon, she took about 8 weeks to recover. You can minimize stress, as this will make the symptoms worse. Seeds in a deep dish, this will help with the eating. Water in a small bowl so he doesn't drown when he gets seizures. Multivitamins will also help.

What do the droppings look like?
 

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Yes, you can put the grit in a seperate bowl and she will help herself to it. I also think antibiotics is not necessary. Paratyphoid (when the brain gets affected) can produce the same symptoms as PMV. Then the antibiotics will make a difference. If she is eating well, then just keep an eye on her for now. You can also weigh her regularly to make sure she is eating enough.

If you need to forcefeed her, put the pea deep inside the beak. That way she will swallow and not spit it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've only cared for 1 PMV pigeon, she took about 8 weeks to recover. You can minimize stress, as this will make the symptoms worse. Seeds in a deep dish, this will help with the eating. Water in a small bowl so he doesn't drown when he gets seizures. Multivitamins will also help.

What do the droppings look like?
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Yes, you can put the grit in a seperate bowl and she will help herself to it. I also think antibiotics is not necessary. Paratyphoid (when the brain gets affected) can produce the same symptoms as PMV. Then the antibiotics will make a difference. If she is eating well, then just keep an eye on her for now. You can also weigh her regularly to make sure she is eating enough.

If you need to forcefeed her, put the pea deep inside the beak. That way she will swallow and not spit it out.
Morning!



Sorry for the delay, my laptop died and I had all kinds of trouble resetting my password on my phone!



Thanks Marina, let me try to reply to both messages!



Were you able to release your PMV pigeon once she recovered? Cher seems so so so docile and sweet, almost like a statue! I keep her cage open because the sound of me opening it seems to really stress her out, and she doesn’t move from her little perch anyway so I think there’s 0% chance she’d even consider leaving.



So she has a medium sized crate in the bathroom, it’s covered on 3 sides and the bottom is toweled and I use white wash clothes under her perch which are removable/washable to monitor her poop. Her food and water are in dishes that are connected to the cage so she can access from her perch, she seems to eat and drink plenty.



As far as the peas, I hope they aren’t necessary because she’s not about that life! She refuses them, and I fed Xena by hand for a few days before using the syringe so I feel like I’m pretty well versed in helping them to swallow. Cher just seems to not want them! Her beak is very very tiny (compared to Xena, who’s s woodie) and She only eats the smaller seeds from the bowl.



I have checked her for canker and obstructions, nothing there. I second guessed myself and checked again but her mouth and throat are lovely and healthy and pink!



Did your PMV pidge just hang out in the cage for those 8 weeks? I do pop her on the floor a few times a day to walk around, (just so she’s moving really) but all she wants is the safety of the crate. When she’s in the crate she can balance on the perch (it’s a wide moss pole for a plant) and she can stay still and even stand on one leg, but when she’s on the floor she’s quite unsteady and does a lot of twisting and star gazing.



As her poops look good, is it more likely to be PMV do you think?



Thank you for all your help! Attaching a few pics!
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I could not view the photos, but if she is eating plenty, then she is ok. Her symptoms might get worse, so just keep on checking her droppings.

Yes, mine spend 8 weeks in a parrot cage and she was fine with that. Her symptoms was very bad by week 6, had plenty of seizures but she recovered well after that. After 8 weeks, I put her in my aviary and she was a bit scared but eventually adapted. She also took a long time to start flying again. I still have her, I've read the symptoms might return so I just did not want to release her.

Rather keep her in the crate, that is where she feels safe. You can put a mirror inside for company and see how she reacts to that. If it stresses her too much, then rather remove it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh I wonder why you can’t see the pictures? Let me try again, I just changed all her bedding.
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Yeh her droppings are so good, compared to Xena who is on formula/meds and has had wet poops for 8 weeks! Im surprised how these poops look like raisins! :)

So for now, I guess just keep her warm and loved!
 

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What dosage of baytril do you give? Xena is still on it for salmonella and the vet was happy to prescribe. Xena is 5mg once a day.

Ive never had an older pigeon before. Does she need grit? I have seeds for her, but she won't touch the peas or corn I've put out. She seems to be eating well but her tiny little beak struggles with the bigger seeds.

Thanks so much!!!
grit is important. If you choose to not give antibiotics to the bird, supply grit. If you decide to give antibiotics, hold off on the grit until the antibiotics are finished. If the grit you provide to the bird is calcium based (oyster shell, lime stone) it will interfere with the efficacy of the medicine
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I decided to avoid the antibiotics for now, she seems to be doing very well, so I’m just going to hope the virus is running it’s course. She’s maintaining weight (between 255 and 260 for a week) and I have sunflower hearts on their way so hopefully that will fatten her up, the seeds I have are tiny and husky so probably not enough nutrition! She doesn’t wanna eat anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Cher is doing really well, she’s not deteriorating thankfully and she’s quite calm and sweet. She’s 266g today so a little gain. I wish I could spend more time with her but i don’t want her too tame if there’s a chance she could be released!
 
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