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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Firstly, thanks to everyone; my partner seems to find it amusing, for some reason, that I've been spending all my time with our new (our first) pigeons and keep ringing him up with updates... at least I can point to you lot here as proof of my relative sanity:)

We got our birds a week and a half ago, and I was under the impression that they wouldn't start breeding until spring, so I was very excited to see one pair mating yesterday. We'd fortunately already bought a couple of nest bowls, and I now have the cock, who used to hide whenever I came into the loft, nearly tamed as the demands of his missus have driven him to the depths of begging twigs off me, one at a time:D

My main question is about how much disturbance a nesting pair will happily tolerate; I'd like to know when she's actually laid eggs, for instance, and she isn't leaving the nest for me to be able to see. I don't know the age of the birds or how experienced they are, though they certainly seem to know what they're doing. They aren't very used to me yet, so I don't want to scare them, but I would like to monitor progress. Any thoughts?

My next question is if I should be worried that she doesn't seem to be coming down to eat. I'm currently feeding them all twice a day and removing left-overs, and she's missed the last two feedings. Should I leave some food near the nest for her?

And this is probably a stupid question, but do adult birds squeak? We sort of assumed that the other birds we got were adults, mainly because of their size, but so far I've heard them squeak a lot and no cooing. Is that normal for adult birds, or does it mean that they're juveniles?

Any input will be gratefully received, and probably followed by more questions...
 

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ok, how many birds do you have? what kind. I assume they are in a loft..if they squeak they are young birds, just not long weaned. the hens do not lay till they are 4 or more months old. to see in the nest just move her aside and look. your not going to hurt anything if you don't do it all the time. it would be nice to put a small crock of feed near her, they eat on their own time, usually when the cock bird changes places with her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot! I'll have a look when I take them their evening feed, and leave her some food.

We have five in total, the breeding pair, which are tipplers, and the other three are Modenas. We don't know any more about them because they all came from auction. They are all in a shed which we've converted into a pigeon palace- I guess they must be reasonably happy with it anyway, since they're breeding:)

It's funny about the modenas- the cock was such a tyrant when they arrived- he was ruling the whole loft and I was worried for the tipplers... now the tippler cock has put him in his place and the modenas only got a decent feed this morning because I was distracting him with twigs. I guess he's become more territorial now that they're expecting?

Anyway, thanks again!
 

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well, breeding in a open loft situation can get dangerouse for the babies, if there is fighting going on, they can get attacked and what they call scalped, best to have pairs only, with the cock birds settled on who has what nest box, so all is peacful. also, they have fake eggs or dummie eggs you can relplace the real ones with for population control, you need to remember the space limitations for healthy birds, 2 ft per bird as a general rule, so you do not want to breed birds if you have no room for them. modenas are really cheeky fat birds aren't they...I really like them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, we have considered the possibility of another loft- maybe we'll need it sooner than we thought. At the moment there isn't any fighting going on, just Gin (the tippler cock) chasing the others around a bit. Do you think the babies would still be in danger?

We do actually want more birds, and I'm in love with Gin and Tonic (does 'tipple' means the same thing in the states? Here if you like a tipple it means you like a drink, hence the names) so I'm quite happy to let them raise these, but we'll keep the population under control.

How do you work out the two feet per bird? The area they have free access to is 6' x 4' x 6' high, with lots of shelves divided up so no one bossy cock can rule them all. I've spoken to people who keep a lot more birds in the same space, but I definitely don't want to overcrowd them, especially while they still have to be kept in. We had originally hoped to be able to allow them all to come and go freely once they were settled, but having read a lot of posts on the subject here it kind of sounds like that may not actually be the kindest option for them- so that's another consideration... We have the same problem with our cats, actually, they came from cat's protection and had never been outside, and now they get supervised garden time because they're so helpless and silly.

The modenas really are cheeky, I find them so funny! The cock always tries to look really fierce when I come in and I can't help thinking it's adorable. One of the hens is really cocky too (I'm pretty sure she's a cocky hen, though I could always have it backwards) and makes me laugh, and the other one is really sweet and laid back.

For the record, I thought it was a better idea to get two pairs to start, but these modenas came as a lot of three and my partner was really set on having them. I'm hoping two of them will pair off and that we'll find a mate for the one who's left out.
 

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yes the babies when they are being weaned will be in danger, they will get picked on, pigeons do attack babies in the nest, esp ones with nothing to do because they do not have a partner, these modenas sound like young birds, so perhaps you will not have trouble with them now...just keep an eye out when the eggs hatch. you could keep 10 birds in that area, so it will not take long to get 5 babies to add up, if that is what you want, usually breeding is done for other reasons than just for the heck of it...there are alot of pigeons in the world...but you will have to decide on that. every one has their own reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay, It's no problem keeping an eye on them, I can't seem to stop watching them anyway. And don't worry, we won't make too many pigeons:) I'm off to read them their bedtime story now- that is, I read and they eat, everyone is happy...
 
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