Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone
I've seen these terms a lot of times but doesn't know what it means:
- Good breeders: is this mean the pair produce good racers or they just good at raising the babies?
- One pin tail: i don't know where to look for it
- Good vent: ?
- Handle like a dream: Is it how the bird handle the weather?
- Tight feather: ?

So, anyone please explain it to me. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,553 Posts
- Good breeders: is this mean the pair produce good racers or they just good at raising the babies?
This means that the birds produce good racers. Quality over quantity
- One pin tail: i don't know where to look for it
I don't know this either lol
- Good vent: ?
It should be all feathery, tight, no ruffed feathers, no signs of loose droppings, Green droppings are never a good sign
- Handle like a dream: Is it how the bird handle the weather?
Handle hmm it could be handling the race or handling in hands. Like when the fancier holds the bird, not sure
- Tight feather
No ruffed feathers, good signs of health, feathers should always be sleek and smooth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
Good breeders to me is when they consistently produce babies that win races.

One pin tail is when the tail feathers are stacked on top of each other like cards and when viewed from the above, it looks like one tail. On the picture of the upper left, the checker bird has that one pin tail compared to the blue-bar on her right:


Tight feather to me is when the feathers are smooth, clean and not out of place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
Hello everyone
I've seen these terms a lot of times but doesn't know what it means:
- Good breeders: is this mean the pair produce good racers or they just good at raising the babies?
- One pin tail: i don't know where to look for it
- Good vent: ?
- Handle like a dream: Is it how the bird handle the weather?
- Tight feather: ?

So, anyone please explain it to me. Thanks
Good breeders, I would think have to have produced birds that do good in the races.

One pin tail, Was answered and the janssens liked this so maybe there is something to it.

Good vents, They are supposed to be tight not open. The vent bones are under the bird behind the end of the keel. Run your fingers back off the keel and then you will feel 2 bones that come from both sides of the bird. This is the vents, they may only feel like a lump to you. They can be touching each other and that is supposed to be good or there can be a gap between them where they don't touch this is supposed to be bad. I don't know how much merrit this has but the Janssens also looked for this.

Handles like a dream, This is just talking about a feel of the bird in your hand but some people like a bird to feel differently than others so who know. I can tell what a good one feels like for me but maybe not for you.

Tight feather, I believe they are talking about the wing here but I am not 100 percent. I think they are talking about the gap between the flights if they are tight there is not large gaps between them. I would not be interested in this info at all.



Winners come in all shapes and sizes esp. between sprint and long distance birds. This talk is just to help sells birds most the time. Tell me how the bird raced or how its parents raced or how many race winners they bred or I would not take the bird for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
The thing to remember in all of this is that these terms are purely a way of verbalizing a person's personal preference in what they like to see in a bird. It may or may not have anything to do with the bird's performance ability. The "pin tail" and "tight vents" have never held much water with me. The "tight feathers" is a sign of general health and this could be seen in a great performer or a poor performer.

I think these are things that one could look at as a possible common thread in good performers but each fancier need to learn what traits are going to be common among his colony. Each family of birds is going to show different traits that flag a potentially good performer. This being said, the only way to know is through race testing.

As has been said, good performers come in all shapes and sizes. Pretty, ugly and everything in between. I personally don't want a loft full of what I would consider to be ugly birds, even if they did win. After all, you race a few days out of the year but you still have to feed, water, care for and clean up the poop 24/7!

The challenge is finding the birds that satisfy your idea of what you want and then developing that family to maximize its potential. EASIER SAID THAN DONE!!!

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Tight vents and one pin tails are just a couple of the traits people think make a good racer. But not necessarily. One of my best birds last year had quite a bushy tail.


As for tight feathers, you want your bird to be sleek and as streamlined as possible. The feathers are held tight to the body, not ruffled or fluffly.

Like Rod said, all of this is how people describe what they like in a bird. The best thing to do is visit lofts and ask to handle some of their birds. Look at the wings, the tail, etc., and get a feel for what REAL good birds feel and look like, not just what people THINK good birds should feel and look like. Soon you'll be able to pick up a bird and judge for yourself whether the bird 'handles good'. Of course looks aren't everything, and even the way they feel may not hold much truth, until of course you put it in a race basket.

But there is some science to this. There are certain shapes and traits that make it easier on the bird to compete at different distances. A full wing will more easily excell at sprint races, because it increases speed. Gaps between the last few flights and having the primaries longer than the secondaries, make it easier on birds flying longer distances. BUT just because they do or don't have certain physical traits, does NOT mean that bird will be good. Good birds and bad birds come in all shapes and sizes. And of course whether or not you win, depends a lot on you. Many birds are capable of flying the distance, it's just they may not be quick enough to win. It's your job to condition and train the birds mentally and physically so that all that's left to do the job, is what the bird has genetically. You do your part, and hopefully the bird will do his.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
And its always a good thing to introduce a bird or two from outside (different blood) to your loft, more traits and all :)
Not trying to argue or anything here, but I would disagree with this statement. Sometimes the introduction of the wrong bird can ruin years worth of good breeding. While bringing in the right outside blood can certainly benefit a colony, bringing in the wrong one can decimate it.

Just my opinion.

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Bringing in new blood every year or so is okay depending on what it is you're bringing. Don't just get anything, but something you think would compliment your birds well. Probably the best way to see if you really do want to breed from a certain strain or family, is to get a young bird kit to test out. You ultimately want something BETTER than you already have, not something just-as-good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
Becky,
You have to credit Dan instead of me about "all of this is how people describe what they like in a bird." As for me I always go for science because obviously it is my training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
I always wondered what the hype was in the one pen tail. Funny how when the birds are in the air it is beneficial to have the tail feathers spread open to steer the bird. The only thing I think a one pen tail might tell you is the health of the bird. That the feathers are healthy and the muscles are strong. Who knows, probably a preference thing like the dreaded "EYE"

Randy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
Not trying to argue or anything here, but I would disagree with this statement. Sometimes the introduction of the wrong bird can ruin years worth of good breeding. While bringing in the right outside blood can certainly benefit a colony, bringing in the wrong one can decimate it.

Just my opinion.

Dan
This is the reason I never try anything to cross with my birds that have not beat me in the races. I also limit the number of birds I will try as a cross. Don't get caught up in the paper here and I think you will be alright. Crossing a pedigree into your birds could decimate them. I only use results to guide me here.

Randy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
My observation with one-pin tail is that it is genetic. Some of my birds have it. Some don't. I am still trying to figure out the advantage for it. I don't know who introduce such concept anyhow that one-pin tail is a better bird.

Nutrition and general upkeep can influence feather quality as irishsyndicate said. Some can also be genetic because I have these nestmates where one has silky feel to it and the other don't. Obviously they get feed the same and take bath the same. I also has these nestmates where one has a thicker feel to it while the other don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,553 Posts
Since I don't race I wouldn't know, but someone said here a while ago that bringing in some good new blood every year is a good thing as it limits inbreeding and all.

I've only kept high flyers my whole life and only traits we look for are:

*How high it flys
*How long it flys

Most high flyers don't fly in a flock. Especially if they tumble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,301 Posts
Hello everyone
I've seen these terms a lot of times but doesn't know what it means:
- Good breeders: is this mean the pair produce good racers or they just good at raising the babies?
- One pin tail: i don't know where to look for it
- Good vent: ?
- Handle like a dream: Is it how the bird handle the weather?
- Tight feather: ?

So, anyone please explain it to me. Thanks
a book on pigeon keeping would be of good use also.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,367 Posts
Beauty is in the eye of the holder....

The thing to remember in all of this is that these terms are purely a way of verbalizing a person's personal preference in what they like to see in a bird. It may or may not have anything to do with the bird's performance ability. The "pin tail" and "tight vents" have never held much water with me. The "tight feathers" is a sign of general health and this could be seen in a great performer or a poor performer.

I think these are things that one could look at as a possible common thread in good performers but each fancier need to learn what traits are going to be common among his colony. Each family of birds is going to show different traits that flag a potentially good performer. This being said, the only way to know is through race testing.

As has been said, good performers come in all shapes and sizes. Pretty, ugly and everything in between. I personally don't want a loft full of what I would consider to be ugly birds, even if they did win. After all, you race a few days out of the year but you still have to feed, water, care for and clean up the poop 24/7!

The challenge is finding the birds that satisfy your idea of what you want and then developing that family to maximize its potential. EASIER SAID THAN DONE!!!

Dan
There are a lot of good posts on this thread, I do think Dan you have articulated my feelings on the subject, better then I could.

Listening to some guy describe the perfect pigeon, may be something like hearing a guy describe the "Perfect Woman". :eek: You will often get answers all over the place, and none of them may be "wrong". There will always be a personal preference or bias that always enters into the description. What I found, in my personal experience, is that what may have been the ideal when I was younger, has changed a bit over time. Call it a matured taste, or an acquired taste.


Physical attributes for the most part, are only what they use to call "skin deep".....the things you can see. They might be pretty to look at, but some of the more important things, like the heart and soul, or the character, disposition etc. can not be detected by the outward appearance.

Now, I may seem a bit cute here, but much can be said for racing pigeons as well. Their heart, their brain, their homing instinct, their territorial instinct, their love of home, their courage, their tenacity, their willingness to brave the elements and endure hardships, are all elements of personality which can not been seen at first glance. And who is to say, that these are not contributing factors to a racing champion ? And I didn't even get into things such as a hardy immune system, or the ability to come into and stay in form. Breeding for a certain kind of wing, or throat, or tail or vent, or add whatever you like to the list, may be very easy to breed into or out of one's colony. Some of the above mentioned traits may be more difficult. As some others have mentioned, the winners have come in all shapes and sizes and with all kinds of different looks and feels. I have had pigeons with all the wrong looks, feels, vents, tails, wings, feathers...you name it, the so called "ugly" pigeon, win me money in races, and I have had what looked and appeared to be a "Perfect" pigeon not race worth a darn. So, for the most part, I have attempted to give up on saying with any degree of certainty, that a winner must always look like this or that. The basket has determined for me at least, what really matters. After the basket presents to me a number of qualified candidates, then I allow my personal bias to select future breeders based on what I happen to like to look at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
G

·
More Newbie Questions Dropings and Handling of birds

Hi, I posted on my confused racing pigeon and have now had her one week. I was reading the Newbie posts and searching the board for handling questions but I noticed someone said GREEN DROPPINGS ARE NOT good. I have exotic birds and for them green with a mix of white is normal. "Pearl" also has had consistently dark green/clear or dark green with a mix of white droppings since I began caring for her. So, what's up? What color SHOULD her droppings be and what does green signal? My normal avian vet will not see her -- she recommends a farm or equine vet, so I am winging it (ha ha) a bit. She shows NO other signs of illness other than the injury she sustained (a gash in the back) that is healing nicely.

Second question. How often do people who own racing pigeons actually "handle" the birds -- mainly for transport to baskets and banding etc? This bird is a bit skittish when I go to handle her, but each time it gets easier.

Thanks.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top