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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone.
Last October, a pigeon flew into my apartment. He then frantically tried to leave, but he kept smashing directly into the closed half of the window and falling to the floor. Later, I noticed he had a loss of balance, even falling down, and then, he started putting his head upside down (known as star-gazing).

I didn't know what to do, especially since I was about to travel to the US for three months. After a long search, I found a veterinary hospital that specialises in birds. Turns out that they have an "SOS" program for wild birds and turtles for a fixed price. (They thought it might be Newcastle Disease.)

So, I come back in January, and the bird was okay, and had just started flying again. However, at home, he wouldn't touch his food, and the hospital suggested to bring him back in after a week of no eating or drinking.

Finally, started eating and drinking, and became part of the family. He absolutely refuses the cage. It is not a real problem because I built some "po-po catchers" under his favourite places, and he has his own bed and bedroom. But he still had the head-turning and balance problem occasionally.

However, all good things must come to an end, because he started freaking out about wanting to be free. He would fly from window to window, fly frantically around the room, and even almost kamikaze me as if he were angry at me for keeping him prisoner.

Now, I get a lot of peer pressure from friends to let him go. However, other friends say, "definitely not," that he would never survive out there.

He is very spoiled, and asks for food several times per day at his special eating place. He won't even consider rice (only mixed millet). The other birds outside act like they are continuously starving and would kill for rice.

I later had to take him back to the hospital where we took an x-ray. This showed severe asymmetry (at the middle ear, says the doctor), so now we know the problem is head trauma.

Then, they made me capture him twice per day and administer via syringe anti-biotic, anti-fungal and motion sickness meds. This seemed to help, but the stress of doing this was almost too much (for the both of us).


Bird Finger Beak Ear Nail


His head-turning and balance problems are at their worst when he is stressed.

Because he goes so nuts, I can't even crack a curtain an inch. So, now, because of no sunlight, I have to give him a Vitamin D mixture, and it's very inconvenient for me to not be able to open the curtains or a window during the day.

He got completely well, but now he started doing the star-gazing again, and falling to the ground every once in a while.

I would hate to lose him, but he wants his freedom so badly.

How is he going to survive after I have pampered him so much?

Is there a rule of thumb about letting them go into the wild after they have been held captive for a while?

It's a real dilema. Any advice would be welcomed.
 

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He is lonely. Is there no way you can adopt a female for him? One that is handicapped will be a good option. They need to have companionship, and a human can never replace the company of another pigeon.

How does he react in front of a mirror? Releasing him will be a death sentence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Marina. I didn't know what would be more painful, receiving a reply recommending that I let him go, or one like yours, saying to let him free would be a "death sentence." Anyway, it's 03.30 in the morning, so I can't tell you more right now. But thanks very much for the response.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello again Marina. Regarding your suggestion that I find him a mate, that would for sure increase his happiness and probably well-being. The other day I had him in the bedroom and, after I let him back in, there were two of them (!). I thought I was losing my mind; they looked identical.

As a test, I let the other pigeon stay a few hours (against doctor's orders). My pigeon seemed very happy with this other bird. But then, the other bird attacked my bird and they fought like I see happen outside when one bird is trying to hoard the food all for himself. When I opened the window again, the other bird shot out so quickly, it was almost unreal. Free again. My bird would of course react the same way if I opened window for him.

Bird Shipping box Parrot Beak Wood


In any event, you are correct. I will try this if I decide not to let him go. So, thanks again.
 

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Hello, everyone.
Last October, a pigeon flew into my apartment. He then frantically tried to leave, but he kept smashing directly into the closed half of the window and falling to the floor. Later, I noticed he had a loss of balance, even falling down, and then, he started putting his head upside down (known as star-gazing).

I didn't know what to do, especially since I was about to travel to the US for three months. After a long search, I found a veterinary hospital that specialises in birds. Turns out that they have an "SOS" program for wild birds and turtles for a fixed price. (They thought it might be Newcastle Disease.)

So, I come back in January, and the bird was okay, and had just started flying again. However, at home, he wouldn't touch his food, and the hospital suggested to bring him back in after a week of no eating or drinking.

Finally, started eating and drinking, and became part of the family. He absolutely refuses the cage. It is not a real problem because I built some "po-po catchers" under his favourite places, and he has his own bed and bedroom. But he still had the head-turning and balance problem occasionally.

However, all good things must come to an end, because he started freaking out about wanting to be free. He would fly from window to window, fly frantically around the room, and even almost kamikaze me as if he were angry at me for keeping him prisoner.

Now, I get a lot of peer pressure from friends to let him go. However, other friends say, "definitely not," that he would never survive out there.

He is very spoiled, and asks for food several times per day at his special eating place. He won't even consider rice (only mixed millet). The other birds outside act like they are continuously starving and would kill for rice.

I later had to take him back to the hospital where we took an x-ray. This showed severe asymmetry (at the middle ear, says the doctor), so now we know the problem is head trauma.

Then, they made me capture him twice per day and administer via syringe anti-biotic, anti-fungal and motion sickness meds. This seemed to help, but the stress of doing this was almost too much (for the both of us).


View attachment 101876

His head-turning and balance problems are at their worst when he is stressed.

Because he goes so nuts, I can't even crack a curtain an inch. So, now, because of no sunlight, I have to give him a Vitamin D mixture, and it's very inconvenient for me to not be able to open the curtains or a window during the day.

He got completely well, but now he started doing the star-gazing again, and falling to the ground every once in a while.

I would hate to lose him, but he wants his freedom so badly.

How is he going to survive after I have pampered him so much?

Is there a rule of thumb about letting them go into the wild after they have been held captive for a while?

It's a real dilema. Any advice would be welcomed.
hi losing balance is cause by era infection you can try amoxicillin it's good stuff very good success rate good luk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey John. I administered antibiotic with a syringe for a week, along with a motion-sickness med and an anti-fungal. He did indeed get better and was fine for several days. But now, after the x-ray, it does not look so good because of the asymmetry in the head. He’s not falling over anymore, but he sure is putting his head upside down a lot. Last night was the first time he slept with the head upside down in a long while (not good). He also falls all the way to the floor sometimes after take-off, but quickly regains control and flies and lands normally.

The dr. said I can stop the meds after his po-po looked okay under the microscope. I wonder if we stopped the antibacterial too soon (?).

A side note, you can see in his photo above that I put him in a tennis shoe to administer the medicine. The doctor told me to bear left or right with the tip of the syringe to prevent choking (makes sense). Since he is free to roam, and very spoiled, it was a difficult thing to catch him, but the shoe was an excellent idea from a friend to keep him still while I was sticking the syringe into his throat. I also used a strip of Velcro around the shoe.

So, I don’t know if he still requires meds for the middle-ear. The dr. said that the Newcastle-type symptoms will probable be forever because of the head trauma.

But, in any event, I will bring all this up next time I take him in. So, thanks for your comment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
To tell you the truth, Marina, I do not know the gender of Spooky. So, I called up the hospital, and they said that they can indeed determine the gender (but for a price). If you know of a way to determine his/her gender by another method or observation, please let me know. But I certainly will determine the gender if I follow your suggestion and get him/her a mate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How does he react in front of a mirror? Releasing him will be a death sentence.
[/QUOTE]

Hi Marina. The mirror thing is really effective. When he first started using this little "bed" as a sitting and sleeping spot, I thought the mirror was too stressful for him, and I almost taped it up. But now, he can sit there for very, very long periods and just look at himself. (Mirrors must really be a strange thing for certain animals.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some days when he is not turning his head too much, and yearns to be outside, I really feel like letting him have his freedom. Very strange this bird; he kind of walks around, and it's like he walks up and says "hey!," and it's like having a dog in a way. Everybody that meets him gets attracted to him, and most (but not all) say to NOT let him go under any circumstances. Is it a crime to keep him locked up? Or a crime to let him go? Would he last a week out there? What would Nikola Tesla do in my situation?
 

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Hey John. I administered antibiotic with a syringe for a week, along with a motion-sickness med and an anti-fungal. He did indeed get better and was fine for several days. But now, after the x-ray, it does not look so good because of the asymmetry in the head. He’s not falling over anymore, but he sure is putting his head upside down a lot. Last night was the first time he slept with the head upside down in a long while (not good). He also falls all the way to the floor sometimes after take-off, but quickly regains control and flies and lands normally.

The dr. said I can stop the meds after his po-po looked okay under the microscope. I wonder if we stopped the antibacterial too soon (?).

A side note, you can see in his photo above that I put him in a tennis shoe to administer the medicine. The doctor told me to bear left or right with the tip of the syringe to prevent choking (makes sense). Since he is free to roam, and very spoiled, it was a difficult thing to catch him, but the shoe was an excellent idea from a friend to keep him still while I was sticking the syringe into his throat. I also used a strip of Velcro around the shoe.

So, I don’t know if he still requires meds for the middle-ear. The dr. said that the Newcastle-type symptoms will probable be forever because of the head trauma.

But, in any event, I will bring all this up next time I take him in. So, thanks for your comment.
1197424
YOU GOTTA REMEMBER WHEN IT COMES TO EAR THERE IS NO QUICK FIX THE BAD NEWS IS CAN GO EITHER WAY THERE IS NO CURE I HAVE THE SAME PROBLEM WITH MY BIRD YOU CAN USE ERA DROPS AND GENTLY MASSAGE IT 1 OR 2 DROPS AND HE'LL DO THE REST GOOD LUK.
 

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Hey John. I administered antibiotic with a syringe for a week, along with a motion-sickness med and an anti-fungal. He did indeed get better and was fine for several days. But now, after the x-ray, it does not look so good because of the asymmetry in the head. He’s not falling over anymore, but he sure is putting his head upside down a lot. Last night was the first time he slept with the head upside down in a long while (not good). He also falls all the way to the floor sometimes after take-off, but quickly regains control and flies and lands normally.

The dr. said I can stop the meds after his po-po looked okay under the microscope. I wonder if we stopped the antibacterial too soon (?).

A side note, you can see in his photo above that I put him in a tennis shoe to administer the medicine. The doctor told me to bear left or right with the tip of the syringe to prevent choking (makes sense). Since he is free to roam, and very spoiled, it was a difficult thing to catch him, but the shoe was an excellent idea from a friend to keep him still while I was sticking the syringe into his throat. I also used a strip of Velcro around the shoe.

So, I don’t know if he still requires meds for the middle-ear. The dr. said that the Newcastle-type symptoms will probable be forever because of the head trauma.

But, in any event, I will bring all this up next time I take him in. So, thanks for your comment.
Did his droppings improved when you gave the meds? And how are they now? I was once advised to give amoxycillin to a pigeon for 3 weeks to cure him. The first 2 times he showed improvement after a week on the meds, but then deterioted again when I
stopped. 3 weeks on the meds cured him. He was also a bit neurological.

He will want to be free, he doesn't realise he won't survive out there. Only a test will prove the sex. Two females will get on, two males definitely won't.
 

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Did his droppings improved when you gave the meds? And how are they now? I was once advised to give amoxycillin to a pigeon for 3 weeks to cure him. The first 2 times he showed improvement after a week on the meds, but then deterioted again when I
stopped. 3 weeks on the meds cured him. He was also a bit neurological.

He will want to be free, he doesn't realise he won't survive out there. Only a test will prove the sex. Two females will get on, two males definitely won't.
1197432 HI AMOXYCILLIN IS YOUR ONLY OPTION TWICE A DAY EVERY 10 HOURS .0 2MILL FOR SEVEN DAYS THE DOWNSIDE IS HE WILL GO OF HIS FOOD
 
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