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i have noticed that my OGO chick is eating on his/her own,but still getting fed from his parents.hes about 25-26 days old,when can i seperate him?
 

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i have noticed that my OGO chick is eating on his/her own,but still getting fed from his parents.hes about 25-26 days old,when can i seperate him?
If you're not in a big hurry to separate, I'd wait until the baby is 30 days old. It's normal for the baby to eat on it's own AND get fed some by the parents.
 
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I'm not familiar with Ogo's, but I recently had a baby pigeon born from two ferals and basically I let the parents decide when it was time to wean. The baby would eat some seeds, but still chased his parents around the cage wanting food. As the parents tried to wean, sometimes this made the baby chase them more. One thing that worked miraculously was when I offered the baby Harrison's bird food. The baby practically inhaled the stuff, and from that day on, never wanted his parents' crop milk again. The only backlash that occurred after this, is that the baby started to hog the seed dish and would beat up his parents if they came near it. Then his parents started beating him up and that was when I had to separate them. This occurred around his 6th or 7th week of life. One website (birdchannel.com) says that if you wean too early, it can cause behavioral problems. Good luck. I would let the adults decide. The parents know when it's time for the youngster to start taking care of himself and when they should kick him out of the nest.
 

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I'm not familiar with Ogo's, but I recently had a baby pigeon born from two ferals and basically I let the parents decide when it was time to wean. The baby would eat some seeds, but still chased his parents around the cage wanting food. As the parents tried to wean, sometimes this made the baby chase them more. One thing that worked miraculously was when I offered the baby Harrison's bird food. The baby practically inhaled the stuff, and from that day on, never wanted his parents' crop milk again. The only backlash that occurred after this, is that the baby started to hog the seed dish and would beat up his parents if they came near it. Then his parents started beating him up and that was when I had to separate them. This occurred around his 6th or 7th week of life. One website (birdchannel.com) says that if you wean too early, it can cause behavioral problems. Good luck. I would let the adults decide. The parents know when it's time for the youngster to start taking care of himself and when they should kick him out of the nest.
 
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