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Hi all,
Me again :eek:

Icarus does not eat very well. He leaves a lot of his food. I'm feeding a mix from the pet shop, and he mainly eats the canada peas and pop corn. He leaves most everything else. never touches the barley or safflower or milo. He's skinny, not plump the way i like a bird to be.

I'm thinking of switching to pellets. This would eliminate his picking and choosing, and also enable me to use popcorn as a treat. Anyone use pellets? What brand do you recommend?

Also, his thin state makes me wonder if he may have parasites, being a feral rescue. Should I treat him for worms? My vet charges $50!!! :eek: to do a fecal on my dogs, so I'd rather not have to take in a sample if I can get away with it. If I do worm him, what do I use?

Thanx!
 

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Pigeons are like this. Give him some time to gain weight. Vitamins and minerals, iodated charcoal, whole wheat bread, probiotic, sun and exercise. All this things help them to improve appetite. I have pigeons eating like pigs, others that choose seeds by color, shape and size.
Use pellets as addition, as your pigeon is not used to this kind of food and it may make his condition worse.
Worming is a good idea and will do no harm if you use right dosage. For prophylactic treatment for worms and canker you don’t need testing. Rather use money to buy medicines.
 

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Yes, he should be wormed, as more than likely he does have some worms. Taking a sample in for the vet to check doesn't always show the worms. Go to Foy's, or some other pigeon supply, and order something for worms. People use different things. Invermectin, Wazine, Moxidectin, pyrantel. There are many different kinds.
 

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Hi all,
Me again :eek:

Icarus does not eat very well. He leaves a lot of his food. I'm feeding a mix from the pet shop, and he mainly eats the canada peas and pop corn. He leaves most everything else. never touches the barley or safflower or milo. He's skinny, not plump the way i like a bird to be.

I'm thinking of switching to pellets. This would eliminate his picking and choosing, and also enable me to use popcorn as a treat. Anyone use pellets? What brand do you recommend?

Also, his thin state makes me wonder if he may have parasites, being a feral rescue. Should I treat him for worms? My vet charges $50!!! :eek: to do a fecal on my dogs, so I'd rather not have to take in a sample if I can get away with it. If I do worm him, what do I use?

Thanx!
I have doves in the house and this feed is really good..link
http://www.harrisonsbirdfoods.com/products/hpf.html

I added a bit to their seed diet a bit every day till it was all pellet, they eat it just fine, I do give treats of safflower and black oil sunflower, or millet sprays, but you can chose the treats. I have three doves so they get only one tablspoon seeds as a treat. I use the high potency fine, the course I think is too big. they look so healthy, better than when they came to me. It may take some time to transfer it over from seed you just have to do it slowly and you can waste some at first, the thing to do is just feed him like twice a day, 1oz x two times a day, up that if he eats all of it, a few seeds left would be perfect.But take up the dish after say 20 mins, don't feed him untill the next feeding do the same thing. he will be hungry when you go to feed him and eat more of what is in his crock, and then just slowly add the pellet diet in with the seeds, use his favs for the treats to teach him to come to you or go in the cage, what ever your wanting. when it is all pellet you could go back to free feeding the pellets and he will/should still want is favorite seed treats.
 

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You can send a fecal sample to foys pigeon supplies.com and they will do an analysis for free.
There have been lots of people that were not too impressed with foys fecal tests. Besides just the simple test isn't really enough. I'd want to do a culture also.
But I agree with plamenh, spend the money on the worm and canker medicine. They all need worming.
 

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with a feral what jay says would be wise, then you can medicate him with the proper meds if he needs any, which Im sure he will, deworming and or antibiotics if need be, it is something you won't have to do very often after this as he is a house bird, only if his poops start looking bad you might want to do it in the future, but a this point in time it would be wise to get the fecal and the culture done as well. you can shop around to more vets to do the tests for you, some want to see the bird others will run test without, but remember when talking to vets about him he is your pet pigeon not a feral;):)
 

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but remember when talking to vets about him he is your pet pigeon not a feral;):)
She's right. Many vets will see or treat a "pet" pigeon, but ridiculously, not a ferral. :rolleyes: So it's always your pet, even if you just picked it up from the sidewalk.
 

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Uhhhh.... $50 is a GREAT deal for a vet to look at a pigeon. The lowest I found in my area was $65. But have been told up to $90 just to bring the bird in and have them take a look -- this does not include any treatment!

You've already gotten a lot of great advice on worming. So I will just tell you about pellets.

I switched for the same reason you did, plus grain is more expensive than pellets and I have a lot of birds to feed so I simply can't afford to have the birds waste food. Since switching to pellets, my birds have never been in better condition! They don't even like grain anymore, which I sometimes offer as a treat. I feed Purina Pigeon Checkers. They DO drink a lot more when they are eating pellets, and they require significantly less grit.

I honestly would never go back to feeding grain. They say that pigeons know what they need...... but mine sure didn't!!!

You will have some waste in the form of mushed pellets that happens during transporting your bag of feed, but the pigeons won't waste it if you don't overfeed them, they clean it all up. ;)
He only has one rescued bird in his apartment, so a 50lb bag of pigeon checkers won't work for him. If I only had a few birds in the house, which I do or a lone pigeon I would buy the bag of harrison's, you can not beat the quaility of it. a 5lb bag will last my three doves a month or more as they only eat about 1 teaspoon each a day and they get some treat seeds too, so it goes a long way, good thing because it is pricey for just 5lbs. about the same as the 50lb of checkers!, wish I could afford to feed my outside pigeons it but then I would be in the poor house then....LOL...
 

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Each Pigeon has his/her own preference for seeds in the Pigeon mix...ones they really look forward to. I would hate to deprive mine of a favorite.It seems like the pellets would be so boring.
Kept Pigeons can have a pretty boring existence unless they are given twigs and sticks to build nests...baths....treats...ample nest boxes and such. I personally think that healthy birds are the ones that are occupied...have some 'intellectual stimulation' in their life.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK, I went to petco and bought some dog wormer. 3 pouches, each with 1 gram of fenbendazole. You're supposed to put it on the dog's food, but I figure I can put it in the water. Anyone know the dosage? It says you have to give it for 3 days.
 

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OK, I went to petco and bought some dog wormer. 3 pouches, each with 1 gram of fenbendazole. You're supposed to put it on the dog's food, but I figure I can put it in the water. Anyone know the dosage? It says you have to give it for 3 days.
What are you going to do with the dog wormer?:confused:
 

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Please scroll to the bottom of the page.

Avian Medications: A to Z
When your bird is sick, you take it to your vet, some tests are run and evaluated, and then a medication is prescribed. When administered as directed for the correct length of time, your bird gets well. That seems very straightforward, doesn't it? However, the simple act of choosing the correct medication for treatment is based on many different factors. Let's take a look at the complicated and confusing world of avian medications so we will have a better understanding of this subject.

There are many medications used in avian medicine today. Veterinarians may choose to prescribe from drugs developed for human use, those labeled for use in dogs and cats, medications compounded from a pharmacy or less commonly, from those actually developed and labeled for use in birds. How a veterinarian chooses a drug to dispense depends on many factors, including the species of the bird, its age, its general condition, what type of disease it has, testing results, drug cost, drug availability, how the drug is formulated (pill, oral suspension, injectable, etc.) and personal choice. Drugs can be given orally, by injection, by nebulization, topically (in the eye, ear canal, etc.), in the cloaca or possibly by a transdermal patch.

Medications usually have two names, the chemical name that is used to describe the drug, and the trade name that is the name given by a drug company to identify their brand of that drug. For example, there are many trade names for the drug combination, trimethoprim/sulfa, including BactrimTM and SeptraTM. For this reason, it is less confusing to use the chemical name when discussing a drug. Also, readers in other countries will probably not be familiar with trade names of drugs in our country and vice versa.

A: antibiotic, one of a group of medications that are used to treat bacterial infections. Some are called broad-spectrum and are used to treat a wide variety of bacteria. Other are used to treat a specific group of bacteria (Gram positive, Gram negative, aerobic, anaerobic). Some antibiotics kill the offending bacteria (bacteriocidal), others just prevent the bacteria from reproducing (bacteriostatic).

aerobic bacteria, bacteria that grow in the presence of oxygen

anaerobic bacteria, bacteria that grow in the absence of oxygen

ampicillin, an antibiotic in the penicillin family, not often used in avian medicine, since many bacteria that cause avian infections are often resistant to it

amoxicillin, an antibiotic in the penicillin family, not often used in avian medicine, since many bacteria that cause avian infections are often resistant to it

amoxicillin and clavulanate, a combination of drugs that makes amoxicillin more effective in treating some bacterial infections

amikacin, an aminoglycocide (as is gentamicin), a potent antibiotic that must be given by injection, as it is not absorbed orally, can cause deafness and/or kidney damage, so fluids should usually be administered during injections to prevent kidney damage, may also be used in nebulization therapy

amphotericin B, a potent antifungal agent, used for treating aspergillosis, given by intravenous injection, nebulization, or directly into the trachea, is toxic to the kidneys, also available in topical cream

aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), potent anti-inflammatory, useful for musculoskeletal pain, also will bring fever down

B: butorphanol, a pain medication and cough suppressant, used to treat pain in avian patients

C: ciprofloxacin, broad-spectrum antibiotic, made for human use, often used in avian medicine, was in the news during anthrax scare because it is a first choice antibiotic for treating that disease, is a fluoroquinolone, in the same family of antibiotics as enrofloxacin (BaytrilTM)

cefotaxime, in the group of cephalosporins, an injectable antibiotic that crosses the blood-brain barrier, can be used to treat susceptible bacterial infections in the brain, and also useful for serious susceptible bacterial infections elsewhere in the body

cephalexin, also a cephalosporin, can be given orally to treat susceptible bacterial infections, may be good for deep skin infections

chloramphenicol, an older antibiotic that is bacteriostatic, chloramphenicol palmitate not available in U.S., but can be compounded, can be given orally, in humans and animals, can cause dangerous anemia

chlortetracycline, an older member of the tetracycline family, formerly used to treat psittacosis (Chlamydophila), oral preparation, however doxycycline is preferred

clotrimazole, an antifungal used as an adjunct to aspergillosis treatment, can be administered into air sacs, into the trachea, topically or by nebulization

calcitonin, a hormone used to treat metabolic bone disease

chorionic gonadotropin, a hormone used to inhibit egg-laying, also used to treat feather-picking due to sexually related disorders

calcium EDTA, preferred initial drug to chelate lead or zinc related to toxicosis, given by injection

carprofen, oral or injectable for pain relief

chelating agent, a drug used to bind toxic elements (lead, zinc, iron) and remove them from the body safely

cortisone, a corticosteroid that should be used with extreme caution in avian patients due to immunosuppressive properties

cisapride, an oral medication to stimulate gastrointestinal motility, increases gastric emptying rate

celecoxib, a COX-2 enzyme inhibitor, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, used to control symptoms of Proventricular Dilatation Disease (PDD), is not a cure

D: doxycycline, a very effective drug for treating psittacosis (Chlamydophila), can be given orally, is bacteriostatic, also available as an injectable preparation that will provide blood levels for one week with just one injection (however, this drug preparation is not available in the U.S., also used to treat susceptible bacterial infections and mycoplasmosis

dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), preferred oral chelator for lead toxicosis, effective for zinc toxicosis

diazepam, used for sedation, seizures, can be used with anesthetic agents, oral or injectable

dexamethasone, a potent steroid, anti-inflammatory, used for shock and trauma, may predispose a bird to aspergillosis and other fungal infections

diphenhydramine, antihistamine, used for allergic feather-picking

E: enrofloxacin, broad-spectrum antibiotic, useful for a wide variety of infections, injectable (can be given orally), tablets, also available in a 3.23% solution for poultry that can be administered orally, multiple injections should not be given, as they can cause serious tissue damage, pain and nerve damage

F: fluconazole, antifungal medication, fungistatic, useful for treating Candida yeast infections, can be combined with nystatin, another treatment for yeast

fluoxetine, used as adjunctive treatment for depression-induced feather-picking, antidepressant

flucytosine, an antifungal, fungistatic, can be used prophylactically in raptors and waterfowl to prevent aspergillosis, may be used as adjuvant for aspergillus treatment

fenbendazole, an antiparasitic drug, not recommended for routine use in avian patients as it can be toxic, perhaps fatal in some species, and other antiparasitic drugs are safer and as effective
 

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Why would you buy a dog wormer for a bird? You can poison him. A bird and a dog are not the same. What is acceptable for one species, will kill another. Buy it online for crying out loud, or try a store where they have birds, and ask. If they don't have something specifically for birds, then go back to square one, and order it online.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Why would you buy a dog wormer for a bird? You can poison him. A bird and a dog are not the same. What is acceptable for one species, will kill another. Buy it online for crying out loud, or try a store where they have birds, and ask. If they don't have something specifically for birds, then go back to square one, and order it online.
it's the same stuff they have at Foys.
 
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