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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I live in Norway and this morning I found a baby pigeon in front of the house. I live in the city, so it was on the street. I moved it to the grass hoping that the mother would come. When I came back this evening he was still there looking unwell and dehydrated. So I took him home and put him in a box on the balcony.
I have no idea how old he is, but he looks like something like this:
http://images.google.no/imgres?imgu...firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&sa=N
Maybe a bit older, as the yellow feathers are dissapearing from the head.
He is lively guy who didn`t like me at first and has been hitting med with the wing :)
He can not fly though, it seams not even close to flying.
I gave him some sugar water on a pippette and that went great. But I do not thing he is interested in the bird food yet.

Now the questions:
- Is it safo to have him on the balcony (it feels the right thing to do since they are birds who live outside, and it is awfully quiet inside). It is getting cold in Norway, down to 10 celcius (50 Farenheit) at night.

- Is sugar water all right for a few days?

- After how many days should I try to get him out?
Does it have to be the place where I found him (close to street), or can it be a near by park. Will he still be able to find his flock?

Thanks for the help!

Jelena
 

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good job, he will need to be hand fed as of right now, you can get some wild bird seed and put in with him to get him used to looking at it and peck at it with your finger to intrest him. to hand feed some thawed frozen peas and corn can be popped in his mouth at the back of the throat. give a small dish of water and stick his beak in it from time to time to show him where the water is, I would keep giving him some water in the pipette for a few days untill you know he is drinking on his own. he will eventually be able to be released where you found him near his flock. after he is weaned and self eating and drinking and flying well.
 

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Hi Jelena,
Maybe it is good idea to get him inside. Not because is to cold, but it is safer. Baby pigeon may decide to get out or be scared of something and he is not ready to be alone without your help.
he will need to be hand fed as of right now, you can get some wild bird seed and put in with him to get him used to looking at it and peck at it with your finger to intrest him. to hand feed some thawed frozen peas and corn can be popped in his mouth at the back of the throat.
I would suggest hand feeding too and honey water is better than sugar water.
 

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Jelena...you need to follow these instructions...

Basic LIFE SAVING steps

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It is vital to stabilize an ill or injured pigeon or dove as soon as possible after rescue.
Three basic steps should be followed.
HEAT, ISOLATION & HYDRATION

HEAT:
A bird must be warmed gradually to a normal body temperature and be responsive (able to swallow). It is not unusual for a baby bird presented for rehabilitation to be very cold. (If a bird is unresponsive, please seek the assistance of an experienced rehabber or avian vet immediately.)

Give the bird a quick, superficial examination. Unless there is a critical situation, e.g., (severe bleeding) all birds should be covered and placed on a heat source* (see below) for at least 20-30 minutes to bring the body temperature back to normal.

If head trauma is suspected, do not place the bird on heat.

ISOLATION:
Allow the bird to stabilize in a quite, dark, warm area.
While the bird is warming, take the opportunity to prepare any other items you may need to care for the bird, e.g., International Rehydrating Solution (recipe noted below)

A 'COLD' BIRD SHOULD NEVER BE GIVEN FLUID OR FOOD, PERIOD!!

HYDRATION:
Fluids should be given after, and ONLY AFTER, the bird has been warmed, examined for any injuries & a determination is made as to the severity of his dehydration.
All fluids should be warmed or at room temperature!

Description and degrees, of hydrated and dehydrated birds
A well hydrated bird will be very alert, have elastic skin, bright eyes, moist, plump membrane inside the mouth and well formed moist droppings.

A moderately dehydrated bird will be less than fully alert, have dry, flaky skin, dull eyes, non-formed droppings and have a sticky membrane in the mouth.

A severely dehydrated bird will be lethargic or unconscious, the skin will 'tent' when slightly pinched, have sunken eyes, dry or absent droppings and have dry membrane in the mouth.

Depending on the cause and degree of dehydration, reversing this condition can take up to 24 hours. If the bird is alert, he may be rehydrated by mouth, using an eye dropper and putting drops along his beak every few minutes, making sure the fluids are room temperature or warmed slightly. Initially, a rehydrating solution should be administered. Plain water should not be given unless nothing else is available.

If the bird is not swallowing on his own or fully alert, he must be given fluids under the skin (sub-Q method).
WARNING!! This procedure should only be performed by an experienced rehabber or vet.

Please follow these simple, basic, yet most important steps.
The cells of the body simply don't work properly when dehydrated. Absolutely no digestive processes can take place if the gut CAN'T work. Absorption will not take place, food sits in the gut, undigested, and will eventually kill the bird.

* Heat source suggestions:
Towel lined heating pad, set on low
Towel lined hot water bottle
Low wattage lamp, directing the light into the cage.

* Emergency heat source substitute:
Fill an old sock about 2/3 full of rice. Microwave the sock for a few seconds. Making sure it isn't too hot, place it around the bird.

* International Rehydrating Solution:
To a cup of warm water add a pinch of salt & sugar, mix well. Use this solution to rehydrate by mouth.

* Emergency rehydrating substitute:
Pedialyte, unflavored.

By following these basic steps you have done your best to stabilize your little feathered patient until further assistance is available.

Cindy
 

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After you have done the previous you can do this...

You can hand feed defrosted corn and peas. Run some hot water over them until they are defrosted and slightly warmed. Put the bird on your lap and hold it next to your body. I f it helps, you can wrap a towel around it or put it in the sleeve of a tee shirt, with the head out the wrist. That confines them without hurting them and makes it easier to handle. Gently open the beak and pop the piece of corn and peas at the back of the mouth and over the throat. You will need to feed 40-50 per feeding and every time the bird’s crop empties until you know it is eating on their own.
This is a wonderful method for teaching babies to eat because they feel the whole food in their mouth and it’s soft and easy to pick up and hang on to. The next step… seeds.
The crop is located right below the throat and with food it fills up like a little balloon. The peas and corn make it lumpy and squishy
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks

Thank you so much for the great suggestions. It helped a lot. The baby dove is doing great so far. I managed to give him water and even corn :) That was not a heard as I imagined!
He still doesn´t use his wing for other than slapping my hand (an angry little man :rolleyes:), but I hope it will not take too long before he can fly away from here. We were thinking to take him to the park in the weekend and train a little..
I will let you know how it goes :)
 

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Hi Jelena,
Do not take him out please. Baby birds do not leave nests until ready to fly and survive. They do not need training. You can let him out in security of your room.
Taking him out will only stress baby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, obviously I have a few things to learn about baby pigeons :) Now, few other questions.
1. How often should I feed him? I got the advice about corn or peas, 40-50 pr. day. Is it best to divide this in 3 portions a day? It seams that the little friend is going to stay here for a while. Is there any other foods I should start with (egg, rice or something else), or continue with corn and peas? Should I increase the amount as he grows? How often should he have water?
He still does not eat anything on his own and we have to open his mouth to feed him. He drinks only is we put the water under the beak in a spoon.
2. I understand that he should stay until he can fly very well. I assume that soon he will be flying around the room. Is there not a big chance that he will hurt himself doing that? I heard some bad stories about that. Is there something I can do to prevent him from getting hurt?
3. I have parakeets. They like to have some sound when they are alone. I assume that the baby dove should be left in a quiet environment all the time. Is that correct? Or is it better that we take him up and interact with him also in between the feeding time?
4. We got some hay to put in the box that the bird is in. Is that an all right way to make him a "nest".
Thanks again for all the advices :)
 

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Ok, obviously I have a few things to learn about baby pigeons Now, few other questions.
1. How often should I feed him? I got the advice about corn or peas, 40-50 pr. day. Is it best to divide this in 3 portions a day? It seams that the little friend is going to stay here for a while. Is there any other foods I should start with (egg, rice or something else), or continue with corn and peas? Should I increase the amount as he grows? How often should he have water?
He still does not eat anything on his own and we have to open his mouth to feed him. He drinks only is we put the water under the beak in a spoon.

The advise was NOT 40-50 pieces a day but 40-50 pieces of defrosted corn and peas per feeding. You need to feed every time the crop is empty. The crop is located right below the throat and above the keel bone. When the crop has food in it it fills up like a little balloon and feels squishy. You can try gently tipping the end of his beak in water to see if he will drink. it helps if you splash the water with you fingers to get the bird's interest.


2. I understand that he should stay until he can fly very well. I assume that soon he will be flying around the room. Is there not a big chance that he will hurt himself doing that? I heard some bad stories about that. Is there something I can do to prevent him from getting hurt?
He should be caged when you are not there to supervise.
3. I have parakeets. They like to have some sound when they are alone. I assume that the baby dove should be left in a quiet environment all the time. Is that correct? Or is it better that we take him up and interact with him also in between the feeding time?
I don't think the music will bother the Dove.
4. We got some hay to put in the box that the bird is in. Is that an all right way to make him a "nest".




It's ok but a towel will do. Is it hay or straw? Straw can come with mites and they can be difficult to get rid of.
This is a baby Dove and not a baby Pigeon?
If this is a Dove, you would feed a bit less per feeding.
Thanks again for all the advices
 

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Ok lets take it one by one:
1. Defrosted and warmed peas and corns (the one for the soup) you can feed tree times a day each time about 40~50 before you feed you can check crop if it is empty.
You can get also bird baby food and make porridge. You can feed in small portions with syringe.
2. If you put him in cage, he can practice flapping his wings. At the moment according your picture it is too early. In 2~3 weeks it will start practicing. You can let him out of cage when you are around to supervise him.
3. Music will not hurt him but it is better when quiet, baby sleeps most of the time.
If you interact and handle him too much, pigeon will bond to you and releasing him becomes a problem, you will need to keep him.:)
4. Old towel, tee-shirt to provide traction for legs will do. Hay needs to be replaced when dirty.

OK Charis was posting at the same time, so now you can double check info:D
 
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