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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best breed of Pigeons to race for distance 50 to 500 mile race is the Janssens Breed a good one for this distance All suggestion will be gratefull
Thanks,Mark
whiteflight8
 

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This is the age of specialization and your range is very broad. 400 and 500 mile birds are things like Jan Ardens and Sions. There are more that do well at those ranges and further.

There are a whole lot of strains that do well up to 350 miles.

And yes, there are some that do okay at all distances. I prefer the longer races myself but the prevailing love of most flyers are young birds. They seldom go beyond 300 miles (occasionally 350 maybe).

So, if you want birds that do well between 50 (I have never heard of a 50 mile race) and 500, then you can get them all over the place. But as I said. Specialization IMO is usually a winner.

I wouldn't go to a Family Pratice doctor to get a heart transplant, unless that was all there was available.

Nothing wrong with having different birds in your loft that specialize in short, medium and long races, all at the same time. They just won't all be the same pigeons. Have some for the 500's and some for the 1-300's. That is what most do I believe.

But ANY pigeon on a given day, can fly fast, straight and true. Training, feed and health are the biggest keys. Providing your birds are not half feral or half Modena. :)

If you go for Janssens, you can't go wrong as a starting point. Heck. There are so many good strains that you almost have to try to not get decent birds ro end up with bad birds.
 

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I don't think it's so much the strain, as it is the fancier you obtain the birds from. Different families of Janssens, Bekaerts, Meulemans, or whatever, can differ greatly across the country depending on what the individual is going for.
So find a good loft who does well at all distances, and see if you can snag some birds out of their stock :) Right now my mind is full of today's combine meeting mumbo jumbo, so I'm not much help in advising a specific loft/family.
 

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So, if you want birds that do well between 50 (I have never heard of a 50 mile race) :)

I think the shortest loft has to be either 70 or 90 miles to be a race. I know a few years ago we had a race like that and a bunch of guys were kicked out of the race when we entered it into the AU site for being too short.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I"am sorry I"am new to the sport of racing pigeon and at this time i do not have any racing pigeons I"am still leaning all that i can before makeing a Big investment I have lean alot of stuff on this web site and i Thank You All :)
I use to have some roller pigeons at one time But i have allways love to watch the racing pigeons.
Thank You All :)
Mark
whiteflight8
 

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What is the best breed of Pigeons to race for distance 50 to 500 mile race is the Janssens Breed a good one for this distance All suggestion will be gratefull
Thanks,Mark
whiteflight8
Ludo Claessens.....:rolleyes:

Of course they are some of the rarest in the World, since there are no more "Originals" being produced, and of the Originals, they are spread around the world. At the last public auction, I think the average selling price was around 11,000+ EURO, which at today's exchange rate in US $ is around $16,000 each. The winner of I think it was $160,000 in the 2008 ? World Ace Challenge was a 1/2 Ludo.

But, as other's have suggested, simply attempting to acquire a particular strain or "name" is often times meaningless. Maybe 75% of all racing pigeons in the USA, have the name "Janssen" somewhere in their background. Simply buying a pair of pigeons from someone who calls his birds "Janssens" may be totally meaningless. Just as IMHO, someone who claims to be breeding "Sions" is a bit misleading, since Paul Sion, the builder of the strain which bears his name, was dead for many years when I first read about his birds in 1965. A heck of a lot of generations and a heck of a lot of pairings and selections have been made by people other then the Grand Master himself in the last half dozen plus decades.

What is important, again IMHO, is to acquire birds preferably which have raced at the distances that you want to compete at, and have made a good showing of themselves. Ideally, they will be from a fancier who owns a family of birds, and your birds will be related to aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters, etc. which have also flown well at the distances you want to compete in. The actual "name" that this fancier assigns to these birds is really not all that important.

Unless you are in a financial position to purchase proven racers and breeders from an International Grand Master, your next best bet might just be to visit your Top Combine Competitor and attempt to develop a relationship, and be prepared to pay some money and hopefully, he or she will furnish you with some good foundation stock.
 
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