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I'm curious if anybody has ever experienced this before. In my 10+ years of having pigeons as a hobby, I have never seen this happen.

First off, I have an old cock bird (Leon). He is a handsome guy. So handsome, in fact, that he has three mates. One of his mates (Halogen) laid a clutch; these eggs hatched two beautiful squabs about a week ago. Throughout the entire time the squabs have been hatched, one of his other mates (Graphite) decided she wanted to help take care of them, I'm assuming. Last week, whenever Leon or Halogen wasn't keeping the little ones warm, Graphite would go to them and feed them. Over the week, I've noticed that Graphite has been getting closer and closer to the squabs, going and feeding them whenever she has a chance. The other day I saw that she took it upon herself to squat on top of one to keep him warm. Today she will not budge. I have been out there multiple times to check on the squabs and she refuses to leave the nest other than to eat/drink. I'm not too concerned because Leon still comes around and feeds them, but Graphite will not let Halogen even close to the squabs, let alone the nest. She just sits there all poofy-and-protective-like as if they were her own. It's so strange! Does anybody think I need to intervene? I'm pretty sure they'll be okay because the squabs are growing at a normal rate and look very happy.
 

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I would intervene, but that's me. Some may not. Just isn't right that the hen who hatched them can't get near them. The way to fix this is to lock Graphite up for now, and get her a mate. I would bring her in, put her in a cage, and give her a couple of weeks. Then I would find her a mate to introduce her to. She really should have her own mate anyway. Singles just cause problems in a loft. Then she could have her own babies to raise.
 

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Sounds like a jealous mom.
To me, the time to intervene is a while past. As long as she and the father are still feeding the babies, I don't see the harm in her raising them this time. But for the future, she should get her own chicks instead of stealing someone elses. That poor pigeon mom lost her babies to another woman.

Edit: I've heard of this happening in horses, a mare will steal a foal from another horse. But often the mare can't keep it because she isn't producing milk. The original mother sometimes takes the foal back, but once the bond is broken people have to intervene.
 

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The original hen would be feeding the baby's less anyway because she probably is ready to lay again. If they are getting fed and taken care of I see no problem.
 

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The problem starts with the fact that this hen needs her own mate to begin with. Singles only cause problems in a loft. If this hen had hatched babies, the male probably wouldn't have helped her with them anyway. He has one mate. Just because he mates with other hens doesn't make them mates. Usually the male will only feed the babies hatched with his mate, and not bother with the babies of the others that he mates with. I would still take her out and get her a mate. She will be taking over the nest box and trying to drive the original hen out if you don't remove her now. Graphite isn't just trying to take over the babies. She is trying to steal the other hens mate. And so far you are letting her do that. She will drive the other hen away. You need to have mates for all the birds.

You are looking at it in another way. You see it as he has 3 mates. Noooooooooo. He has one mate and 2 mistresses. One mistress is trying to steal the other hens mate. And she will do it if you let her. Things just go smoother when they are all in pairs.
 

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Well, if you want happy birds and less stress in the loft, which leads to less illness, than you try to make things less stressful for everyone. In the wild there wouldn't be these problems as they would be free to come and go and find their own mates. When we keep them confined, they have no choice. So up to us to try and fill their needs.
 

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This happens alot with my fantails! At first I intervened because I thought someone would get hurt. But never happened. I have quite a few that share the responsibilities. I was causing more chaos by intervening.
I have 1 particular cock that has a mate, and a mistress. He stays with his mate and helps care for her babies. The mistress takes care of her babies all by herself, with no help from him. They seem to like it that way! :confused::rolleyes:
 

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The problem starts with the fact that this hen needs her own mate to begin with. Singles only cause problems in a loft. If this hen had hatched babies, the male probably wouldn't have helped her with them anyway. He has one mate. Just because he mates with other hens doesn't make them mates. Usually the male will only feed the babies hatched with his mate, and not bother with the babies of the others that he mates with. I would still take her out and get her a mate. She will be taking over the nest box and trying to drive the original hen out if you don't remove her now. Graphite isn't just trying to take over the babies. She is trying to steal the other hens mate. And so far you are letting her do that. She will drive the other hen away. You need to have mates for all the birds.

You are looking at it in another way. You see it as he has 3 mates. Noooooooooo. He has one mate and 2 mistresses. One mistress is trying to steal the other hens mate. And she will do it if you let her. Things just go smoother when they are all in pairs.
LOL....Graphite is a hussy!.....:D
 
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