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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.

I was just advised to immediately remove the tail feathers of my fantails so that they can grow new feathers for the show. The show is in 7 weeks.

Is this correct? Is this safe for the birds?

I'm very new at showing my birds; I want to make a good impression at the show; and, my birds to make a good impression to the judges.

Please advise. It's urgent.

Cheers.
Michael.
 

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Omg that sounds painful, how awful to have to do that - I can't even bring myself to pluck five chest feathers for DNA testing, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi.

I'm told they feel nothing. There is 'no pain at all'. But, I don't know; and, I won't subject my birds to unnecessary pain for any reason.

Cheers.
Michael.
 

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Omg that sounds painful, how awful to have to do that - I can't even bring myself to pluck five chest feathers for DNA testing, lol.
I agree with you! I think I would rather pull out my own hair before I could pluck my pigeons' feathers lol especially the tail feathers, those "root" thingies are thick! it must hurt them!
 

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Its depends upon the life of feathers. If they are new they feel more pain and if they old feature about 4-5 month then it cause very less pain feeling for them.
Can a senior guy can confirm it.
Thanks
 

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I just started with Indian Fantails, I'm about to start breeding them so have been reading up a lot on looking after their feathers.

If plucking the tail feathers is done the right way, and the feathers aren't new, it shouldn't hurt them. You pinch the skin at the root of each feather, then quickly pluck the feather out. As long as the skin is tight it shouldn't hurt. The same applies to ladies who are waxing excess hair, it works better and is less painful if the skin is held taut.

Here's an excerpt from an article about breeding fantails with further details and instructions:

"One other note regarding young birds is that once the tail feathers have fully grown out and hardened and the young bird is in good form healthwise you can pull the entire tail. This is best done by holding the bird firmly in one hand and with that same hand pinching the skin where the feather joins the body. Then with the other hand a quick pull of the feather will remove it without damaging the skin. Once you pull an entire tail, one feather at a time, it is imperative that the bird gets a high protein diet to assist in developing 30 plus new tail feathers for at least 10 weeks while they grow in and harden. The new tail feathers will be broader and longer, more to the dimensions of a mature tail. The tail is generally a fuller circle as well."

Source: http://indianfantailcanada.ca/pdfs/Mating -FF article on mating #2.pdf

The same also applies to birds being readied for showing.
 

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Hi.

I was just advised to immediately remove the tail feathers of my fantails so that they can grow new feathers for the show. The show is in 7 weeks.

Is this correct? Is this safe for the birds?

I'm very new at showing my birds; I want to make a good impression at the show; and, my birds to make a good impression to the judges.

Please advise. It's urgent.

Cheers.
Michael.
I think I would go to a few shows and ask, or try to find a mentor.

But remember the birds interest first before a blue ribbon. You may find show folks that go about it more naturally and don't follow what has always been done. Esp if the procedure can be stressful to the bird.
 

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Years ago I raised Indian Fantails and I never plucked their tails or any of their feathers. And I won many trophies and first place ribbons. Don't crowd them and give them bath water occasionally. Good luck at the shows and most importantly-Have Fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you. I haven't been pulling feathers. My birds seem to do just fine. A few of my birds have won best in classification; just not best in breed ... yet. But, I'm confident I'm getting close.

Cheers.
 
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