Pigeon-Talk banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,315 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have the chance to give some pigeons that had PMV but are now recovered. I know this subject has been dicussed before here but cannot find what was said. Could someone point me in the right direction to that discussion or just tell me if it is safe for healthy birds to be with these birds?
For the life of me I don't remember what I read.:confused:
Thanks.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,315 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
These are birds that need a new home and have recovered from PMV.
I just wanted to know if I could keep them with other birds or if they needed a seperate loft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
The PMV is reported to have a mortality rate of about 80%, with death occurring within 48 hours from the time the symptoms present themselves. There is a short period of time when an infected bird will shed viral particles and it is infectious, and for that reason the recommended form of treatment is to cull them as quickly as possible.The survivors will carry the DNA of the infection in their genes, but are not known to be infectious.

SO the bottom line is that if you have survivors who have lived beyond 30 days in your care and display no symptoms, they should be safe to mingle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,478 Posts
Only thing I would add is that though, as Grimaldy says, they cease to be infectious after a while (we impose a minimum quarantine of six weeks), some can have recurrence of the neurological symptoms which may mean they become flightless and, if showing the twisting of the neck, need to be checked to ensure they are getting sufficient food. Many never show any further symptoms, though.

We have actually not had any fatalities due to PMV itself. I think it's likely that feral birds' mortality is due to becoming an easy target for predators, inability to forage, and other knock-on effects.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,336 Posts
ESL just wanted to say how much I love your signature!

Mortality rate for PMV can be as low as 5%, but in 7 years I have only had one feral pigeon (Anastasia) with PMV die, and it was mycoplasmosis that killed her.

Cynthia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,315 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all your input, I feel even more confident about taking in these pigeons and will assess each individual bird on how they are physically.


Thanks cyro51, I truly believe what my signature says.:D
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top