Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
It was constantly pooping around the area and wasn't moving much when we approached it other than shivering and moving his head back
Did or do the bird's droppings contain a notable amount of green or brown (fecal matter), as well as white (solid urine)? In the posted picture, it looks like there is one dropping visible that doesn't include much fecal matter, that indicates either that he isn't passing much food, or isn't eating much food.

How cold is the weather? The "shivering" and lifting his head back (as if to peck at you) is likely the bird warning you not to get too close because he was afraid.

A little lemon juice in drinking water (1 teaspoon or less per cup of room-temperature water) will provide electrolytes and other nutrients in an easily digestible form. If his droppings have included a notable amount of green or brown solid poop, then it is safe to feed him solid foods such as raw, unshelled sunflower seeds, dried or thawed-from-frozen peas, dry mung beans, rice, oats, wheat, etc.

After he has had some electrolytes and food he should perk-up noticeably within a couple of hours. If not, he may have wounds or injuries that aren't obvious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
If the weather is very hot, don't give him more heat. If he is cold he will fluff-up all of his feathers to trap air within the layers like a blanket. He doesn't appear to be doing that in the photo, so I'd say that he is already warm and possibly a bit warmer than he would like given that he is holding his feathers down flat.

If you give him a dish of water with lemon juice or other electrolytes, does he drink on his own? If you give him seeds, does he eat them?


EDIT: Heat should not be provided if the current ambient temperature is already ~ 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Source: "Journal of Wildlife Rehabilitation, Volume 26, Number 4"

Font Document Number Electric blue Screenshot

http://theiwrc.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Volume-26-No.-4-Winter-2003.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Try a small dish of water held just below the bird's beak, then slightly lift the dish so that the tip of the beak is in the water and he may drink on his own at that point. Be careful not to let the water cover the nares/nostrils just below the white operculum at the start of the bird's beak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
No signs of any injuries / wounds? If you hold his beak open and look inside his mouth and down the throat at the back, does he have any yellow growths or small white spots or white streaks?

As long as he is consuming water and food, and passing droppings with green/brown fecal matter, he has a chance to recover. If any of those three things stops completely, he would not be likely to recover.

If you gently feel the area of the bird's crop at the base of his neck, does it feel full?

Bird Jaw Organism Elbow Slope



Gesture Beak Adaptation Snout Terrestrial animal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Head Eye Plant Human body Jaw

Cylinder Writing instrument accessory Font Service Tool

^ Plastic feeding syringe for water or liquified food.



It is possible to hand-feed seeds directly into the bird's beak, then gently stroke downward on the outside of his throat to get him to swallow. A feeding syringe can be used to squirt water down the bird's throat at the back of his beak, being careful not to get water into the bird's airway / trachea.

White spots inside the beak may be due to a yeast or fungal infection. A lot of naturally anti-fungal foods will help the bird to overcome a fungal infection. Raw, unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar diluted in drinking water (about 1/4 teaspoon per cup of water), garlic, ginger, coriander and others will kill yeast in the bird's throat, crop, and digestive tract.

Another possibility is canker, which normally produces yellow growths within the bird's throat / esophagus. It can also produce white mucus which may be visible at the back of the beak.


The little white spot on his wing looks like a down feather. They are normally under the larger feathers but if the bird isn't preening his feathers then they are sometimes left sticking out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
He's actually littered in the box quite too much, and it's now darkgreenish color with some white in it. It's in a more semi liquid form and i really can not make out much of it
If you are able to post a picture of the droppings it would help others to diagnose. It sounds as though he is getting more water, which is a good sign. The refusal of water is very odd. Both garlic and lime are anti-fungal and would immediately effect fungal or yeast infections in the beak, throat, and crop.

What am I supposed to do at this stage
Given that he is producing wet droppings now, perhaps just let him rest for awhile. Is he making any sounds while breathing? Rasping, gasping, wheezing etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Generally speaking, I expect that people who are able and willing to take an ill or injured animal to a vet, would do so instead of posting at an Internet forum. Except perhaps if they don't realize the severity of the affliction and at this point it still isn't clear what the affliction is -- could be physical damage, or PMV, or some other infection. There are a lot of reasons why people may choose not to take an animal to a vet. Probably even more reasons in India than in cities of the United States. Even where I live the vast majority of vets who treat birds will immediately propose euthanizing any feral pigeon. Virtually all will refuse any alternate treatment, and those that might treat the bird typically want more money for the service than I have available to spend. As it is, with the exception of a wildlife rehabber a couple of counties away, I'd bet that I have successfully treated more injured or ill pigeons than all the vets in my city combined. I had no experience at all when I started, only concern and the desire to care for the birds.

Provided that the bird isn't actively bleeding, is consuming water and preferably food, and is producing fecal matter in droppings indicating that it is passing food through its system, the bird can recover. The main problem for inexperienced care-givers is that they don't know what to expect, nor what constitutes an immediately life-threatening emergency, except perhaps bleeding, and even then most people think that that is more of an emergency than it usually is. The birds are amazingly resilient and unless systemic organ damage has already occurred, they want to survive. Gentle and calm actual caring and actively providing care to the bird are more often successful than not.

I would never discourage someone who genuinely wants to actively care for a creature to not do so, nor to trust others to do so instead. Except perhaps for lab tests or X-rays to determine what exactly is wrong with the bird.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
I agree that vets are typically disappointing where feral pigeons are concerned. I don't use any synthetic meds and the birds that I treat survive, but they are all feral pigeons who are accustomed to taking care of themselves without synthetic antibiotics despite being exposed to pathogenic bacteria all day, every day. Perhaps their immune systems are better developed than those of indoor birds.

You mentioned head going back.
Yes, that could be ataxia due to PMV / paramyxovirus if it is an abnormal movement, but it is far more likely in a feral pigeon that it is preparing to peck at someone familiar who is getting too close.

^ Pigeons annoying each other. At 6 seconds a wing-slap, then the pecking begins. Look at how they move their heads back when preparing to make the next peck. At one point the bird on the left shakes his wing as warning of the next wing slap too.

^ That is a bird suffering from paramyxovirus. That bird also moves its head back, but it moves in an unnatural / abnormal way that would usually result in someone describing it very differently than just as "moving its head back".
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top