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This bird is going to continue to deteriorate while these well-meaning yet inexperienced rescuers try all of your helpful but ineffective suggestions. A bird that ill needs immediate care by an experienced rehabilitator or avian vet.
 

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Generally speaking, I expect that people who are able and willing to take an ill or injured animal to a vet, would do so instead of posting at an Internet forum. Except perhaps if they don't realize the severity of the affliction and at this point it still isn't clear what the affliction is -- could be physical damage, or PMV, or some other infection. There are a lot of reasons why people may choose not to take an animal to a vet. Probably even more reasons in India than in cities of the United States. Even where I live the vast majority of vets who treat birds will immediately propose euthanizing any feral pigeon. Virtually all will refuse any alternate treatment, and those that might treat the bird typically want more money for the service than I have available to spend. As it is, with the exception of a wildlife rehabber a couple of counties away, I'd bet that I have successfully treated more injured or ill pigeons than all the vets in my city combined. I had no experience at all when I started, only concern and the desire to care for the birds.

Provided that the bird isn't actively bleeding, is consuming water and preferably food, and is producing fecal matter in droppings indicating that it is passing food through its system, the bird can recover. The main problem for inexperienced care-givers is that they don't know what to expect, nor what constitutes an immediately life-threatening emergency, except perhaps bleeding, and even then most people think that that is more of an emergency than it usually is. The birds are amazingly resilient and unless systemic organ damage has already occurred, they want to survive. Gentle and calm actual caring and actively providing care to the bird are more often successful than not.

I would never discourage someone who genuinely wants to actively care for a creature to not do so, nor to trust others to do so instead. Except perhaps for lab tests or X-rays to determine what exactly is wrong with the bird.
 

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Hey, I live in an apartment and yesterday morning we found our usually hungry and active feral pigeon not moving around and sitting in a corner of our balcony
We thought it was resting and staying in shade since it's pretty hot and kept the water and food out as usual but even after two hours or so it didn't seem to move nor eat or drink anything which was quite unusual
It was constantly pooping around the area and wasn't moving much when we approached it other than shivering and moving his head back
Since we haven't faced a situation like this and because we've never raised any other pet let alone a pigeon we were quite clueless and scared obviously did not want our furry mate dying
It wasn't letting us touch it so we trying using a dropper to help it drink some water and it wasn't doing on its own
I did see a few posts here asking to warm the pigeon first before giving fluids or food, and I'm afraid we didn't do the step
At night yesterday night it was still at out balcony sitting right outside the glass door and so we kept it in a small cardboard box
Today morning it's still pretty much there and I'm afraid it ooks weaker, it's avoiding the water given
We took it inside as of now and we do not have a heating pad so we're warming a cloth continuously and putting it over it's body so as to warm him.
Can someone help me out with this situation?

View attachment 101145
This is how the little one looks as of now
Being inexperienced we're quite concerned as of how to bring it back to its usual state
You have google? You can research the problem. It may be ataxia. This occurs as result of other illness and burd cant balance itself and has falling over issues. You mentioned head going back. This is part of ataxia. Please research pigeon illnesses. This is why phones today are useful.
 

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You have google? You can research the problem. It may be ataxia. This occurs as result of other illness and burd cant balance itself and has falling over issues. You mentioned head going back. This is part of ataxia. Please research pigeon illnesses. This is why phones today are useful.
Vets make problems worse unless it's an avian vet which are super rare. Do your research as bird needs meds. Meds can be bought on Ebay and amazon. Keep birds away from the vets please. All they want to do is kill a precious life.
 

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I agree that vets are typically disappointing where feral pigeons are concerned. I don't use any synthetic meds and the birds that I treat survive, but they are all feral pigeons who are accustomed to taking care of themselves without synthetic antibiotics despite being exposed to pathogenic bacteria all day, every day. Perhaps their immune systems are better developed than those of indoor birds.

You mentioned head going back.
Yes, that could be ataxia due to PMV / paramyxovirus if it is an abnormal movement, but it is far more likely in a feral pigeon that it is preparing to peck at someone familiar who is getting too close.

^ Pigeons annoying each other. At 6 seconds a wing-slap, then the pecking begins. Look at how they move their heads back when preparing to make the next peck. At one point the bird on the left shakes his wing as warning of the next wing slap too.

^ That is a bird suffering from paramyxovirus. That bird also moves its head back, but it moves in an unnatural / abnormal way that would usually result in someone describing it very differently than just as "moving its head back".
 
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