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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title says, what is a good racing method for a novice to use.

This is my first season really flying, and at the moment all my birds are kept in a 8'x8', was wondering if should split this into 2 sections, 1 for hens and 1 for cocks, or split it 1 for Racing and 1 for Breeding.

Thoughts
 

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are you racing old or young birds

disclaimer: I am a new flier too so my thoughts are not based on experience, but more from a voice of someone in a similar stage as you. the experienced guys here from your country will chime in soon no doubt with some good tips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Both, was going to start 2 yrs ago, but things didn't go as planned, so started this year.

Was thinking along the lines of widowhood, but was not sure if it only applied to old birds ie: race only old cocks and YB race hens and cocks?
 

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Your 8x8 would be great to fly young birds out of and build another 8x8 with 2 sections to house your breeders. You should do fine if you keep it down to 12 breeding pairs. Separate the pairs during the nonbreeding times and put them together for babies. You should do fine with 1 to 3 rounds out of them for the YB season. You should always keep in mind where the birds you don't need like the old racers and breeders you replace have to go. You can't keep them all. People forget that after the races are gone they have a lot of birds to get rid of. Make sure you have a plan in place for everything before you jump in with both feet. If you race with old birds your going to need even more room for the old race team to be housed. They can double as your breeders but there race season is in the middle of breeding season. Flying the natural system is better to start with flying OB and you get babies to race. It all comes down to real expectations what do you want to get out of it. I highly recommend shadowing and becoming a partner with an experienced flyer. You will learn more faster and avoid a lot of the pitfalls of a beginner. Plus find out where the club is, what are the dues, what. Are you looking at trans fees for the race series, time clock they use and expected feed and med costs. You can do it on a shoe string budget but its not fare to the birds. Just some food for thought. The best thing I did was become someone's partner and mentor under them.
 

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rg...to race successfully is not real difficult, but there are things you will need to know. First, you need good pigeons( notice I said good not expensive... a lot of fanciers will tell you the best bird they ever got, was given to them for free.) Second, you need to have really healthy pigeons(unhealthy pigeons don't race) so make sure you loft is clean, dry and well ventilated.(fresh air is number one for healthy lungs).Most veteran pigeon flyers have a daily and weekly routine. In other words have a daily schedule, feed the same time or close to the same time every day (pigeons love consistency, it keeps them calm). The weekly routine starts on the day of the race. This routine has to do with feed, meds, supplements and training. Third, motivation is important. Spend time with your birds so they aren't afraid of you. Get them tame enough to eat out your hand. Always be as gentle with them as possible. You want them to feel safe around you and in their loft.
 
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