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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What happens if I breed a Homing pigeon with a regular pigeon?
Let's that I get a pigeon from the street and breed it with my homer? Would it do any difference if my pigeon was a male or female? What will I get as far as the quality?
Thank you?
 

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Well if you mated a homer with a roller the young would no longer be a homer or a roller. So if you mated it with a street bird you could always turn the young out with a flock of street birds and they would get along just fine. If you wanted to train the young with your homers you would lose them.
Dave
 

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I wouldn't recommend breeding different birds together if you don't have a purpose. The bird will no longer be a pure racing pigeon and you will also not be able to release it into the wild since it is born in a loft and it may not find food + shelter plus there is a risk of predators attacking a bird which is not naturally wild born.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That is all correct! But my question is will the bird be able to attain some of the characteristics of the homing pigeon like its homing instinct?

A couple of years I found a lost homing pigeon and by the look on the bird he was a fine bird. It didn't take long for the bird to become sad as he didn't have a mate so I trapped a wild black hen and gave it to the male homer. Soon they became a pair and hatched several young birds. Of the six they had together only two made it to adulthood. A male and a female. Both the birds were really smart and were the led birds in flight later in time. The hybrid female which I then breed with homer once again gave me also really smart birds and capable of flying many miles. Unfortunately, I sold them and later both new birds.

Now I am curious to know what would happen if one of my homers were to breed with a white non homing pigeon?
 

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Well in this case, you'd once again get a result of pigeons that are not pure racing homers or pure whatever breed the white hen is. However, in this case the pigeons may have worse homing ability since ferals do, to some extent have a homing ability. The white pigeon which has no homing ability bred with a homing pigeon will probably result in pigeons that cannot breed.
 

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That is all correct! But my question is will the bird be able to attain some of the characteristics of the homing pigeon like its homing instinct?

A couple of years I found a lost homing pigeon and by the look on the bird he was a fine bird. It didn't take long for the bird to become sad as he didn't have a mate so I trapped a wild black hen and gave it to the male homer. Soon they became a pair and hatched several young birds. Of the six they had together only two made it to adulthood. A male and a female. Both the birds were really smart and were the led birds in flight later in time. The hybrid female which I then breed with homer once again gave me also really smart birds and capable of flying many miles. Unfortunately, I sold them and later both new birds.

Now I am curious to know what would happen if one of my homers were to breed with a white non homing pigeon?
what would happen?... you would have a mix breed pigeon.. that is about it.. all pigeons have some homing ability.. the homing pigeon has been bred to do this better than the others. you would end up with a pigeon that may or may not have good homing abitlities.. I really don't see the point in taking birds away from their home unless you are in a racing club and you like the sport of racing. or if one has a white release business.
 

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so what if i want a pigeon that can roll and home, will a roller and a homer give me that? I know that the offspring will only have 50% of each ability but it can roll and home right?
 

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I was given a roller cross homer once and well he didn't roll, just kind of tilted his body back and then went on flying again, and I never trained him from distances cause I could just tell he didn't have much of a homing instinct.


I would highly recommend not to breed different breeds together because the offspring will not be pure anymore and will not have any of the desirable traits that both of the breeds originally had.
 

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I was given a roller cross homer once and well he didn't roll, just kind of tilted his body back and then went on flying again, and I never trained him from distances cause I could just tell he didn't have much of a homing instinct.


I would highly recommend not to breed different breeds together because the offspring will not be pure anymore and will not have any of the desirable traits that both of the breeds originally had.
what about putting him with the other rollers. When the flock pure rollers roll, does he roll with them? (Because if it fly solo, it might not roll)
Same for homing too. If you release it with the other flock of pure homers, will he make it home from a long distance?

Reason im asking because i found that in human, when people cross breed like an Asia cross breed with a Caucasian, there offspring are the most beautiful people. example (Denial Henney, or Alicia key(half jamacan half italian)
Yes i know that bird is different from mammal but does cross genetic process the same for every living creature?
 

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Your post says hybrid when what you will get is a lobrid, If you mix it with a street bird or a roller it will no longer be a homer. If you get the young to home from 25 mi it will be on a good day. If you mix it with a roller they will not roll. If you want birds that roll buy rollers, if you want to have them come home from a long distance get him a homer mate. With any thing else all you will end up with is a mutt.
Dave
 

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Here are some pictures of crosses between a male racing homer and a female common/bridge/wild/barn pigeon.


Here is my other young cross, too bad he was attacked by a hawk His father was a wild blue bar with white flights, and his mother was a black feathered foot racing homer.
 

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They were okay...I did fly them around my loft, and the two in the first 2 pictures flew with my homers around the loft just fine, I probably took them out to 5 miles, and that was the farthest I took them, and they always came back. The bottom one just began following my other birds around and flocking when he was taken.
 

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You'll never know until you try. Feral pigeons are made mostly of homers/racers anyway. They just haven't been selectively bred all the time for better and better birds. Ask Walt (conditionfreak) about his racers with feral blood in them.
 

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my dad said when he was a kid he has a red and white grizzle cockbird that was a feral pigeon and he put a red hopmer hen with him and when the babies got older hebred them to solid white racing homers and after all that he had those babies they were reds and red and white grizzle and he got a blue bar hen out of them. one ofr the grizzle babies was one of the best birds he said he had for some reason it had alot of homing ability and had a smaller body but was neat. flew them all but that was the 2nd gernerasion of them the gizzle babies he got that were 50/50 he didnt fly but he said their babies did good.
 

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Your post says hybrid when what you will get is a lobrid, If you mix it with a street bird or a roller it will no longer be a homer. If you get the young to home from 25 mi it will be on a good day. If you mix it with a roller they will not roll. If you want birds that roll buy rollers, if you want to have them come home from a long distance get him a homer mate. With any thing else all you will end up with is a mutt.
Dave
hybrid = an animal or plant resulting from a cross.

i think you to talking about highbreed and lowbreed right?
 

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hy-brid : the offspring of two animals or plants of different breeds, varieties, species, or genera, especially as produced through human manipulation for specific genetic characteristics.
I think the use of the word is done more for the breeding of different species most times like a tiger and a lion.. a liger... a ring neck dove and a pigeon..ect.. pigeon breeds are all under the rock dove family..so really I would call the mixing of the breeds cross breeding.. but that is just me..lol..
 

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I wouldn't recommend breeding different birds together if you don't have a purpose. The bird will no longer be a pure racing pigeon and you will also not be able to release it into the wild since it is born in a loft and it may not find food + shelter plus there is a risk of predators attacking a bird which is not naturally wild born.
racing pigeon (racing pigeon) is not pure breed pal. is also result of crossbreeding

article from wikipedia

Development
Racing pigeons were first developed in Belgium and England during the Nineteenth Century.[1] They are the result of crossing of a number of other breeds, primarily the Smerle, French Cumulet, English Carrier, Dragoon, and the Horseman (now lost). From the high-flying Cumulet, the Homer received its endurance, the ability to fly for hours on end without tiring. From the Carrier, it inherited the ability to find its way home from great distances
 
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