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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Im wondering how exactly pigeon races work? How do they make it so that the distance raced is fair for every bird?
What about clocks?/
Does every racing loft have to have one?
How do you know the exact time the bird came back?
 

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The races are based on speed not distance. So the fastest bird wins. Every bird races to their own loft and even though some are farther than others it is the fastest that wins. Every loft has a clock and has to time the bird as it comes in the loft. You then goto the club to figure the speed and see who wins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So basically, youre really lucky if you are the closest loft from the starting point and it really sucks if youre the furthest away?
 

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Not necessarily. It diffinitely seems to be better flying on the short side. But flying long is sometimes not so bad under certain conditions. There are people who intentionally move to a new home that is in an optimum spot for their pigeon racing.

I haven't been that aggressive with this sport (yet).

Imagine how big your smile will be when you beat all of those shorter distance lofts if you are the "long" guy. :)

Racing speeds are broken down to how many yards per minute your bird flew. So, in a one hundred mile race, maybe your birds actually fly 122 miles from the release point and someone elses birds actually flew 92 miles to thier own loft. The starting points are the same but the finishing points are different.

So, if it took your bird longer to get home, you still may be the winner because of how fast it flew. That other guy could have clocked his bird at 10:38 and you clocked your bird at 11:01, but your bird may have flown faster (again, figured out to Yards Per Minute "ypm") because it is already a known factor exactly how far your loft is fromt he release point and how far everyone elses is. This is figured out now by GPS device location. A GPS device is put on the landing boeard of your loft and it reads your GPS location on the earth. Then it is a simple matter to ascertain your lofts distance from anywhere in the world that has a GPS location also known (all of the race release points your club uses).

Birds are clocked when they arrive at your loft, either by hand (not done much any more), or by an electronic sensor clocking system, that uses an electronic chip that the bird carries on its' leg. These little electronic chip bands that the birds now carry are the biggest evolution in this sport, EVER. You don't even have to be home when the bird comes in from the race. Used to you had to actually catch the bird after it entered the loft, and remove a serialized rubber band from the pigeons leg and insert it into a small sealed clock and turn a crank to imprint the time on a piece of paper in the sealed clock. Really, one of the last things you want to do with a pigeon returning from a race, is to make it skittish about entering the loft when it arrives. You are losing time because the bird doesn't want to be snatched inside the loft and it remembers that is what happened last time it came home from a race. So it lingers on the landing board, hesitating to enter.

So, this electronic clocking stuff is the bomb, as far as most are concerned.

It is the greatest sport in the world, aside from basketball :)
 

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So basically, youre really lucky if you are the closest loft from the starting point and it really sucks if youre the furthest away?
Not so PIXY the COMBINE which is made up of 3 or more clubs. Now the combine that I flew in there is a difference of 45 miles from the short end to the long end,and over the years we have seen where the winners are just about the same for the long and short guys.In our case we see that the faster races are won by the short end while the slower races are won by the long enders.That is the combine. Now each club in the combine has a club race so there is also a club winner, so you see we actualy have more then one race at the same time each club has a winner and there is one over all winner for the combine. Keep in mind that there many factors that come into play that effect the speed of the race.Weather, wind direction to name a few.GEORGE;)
 

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Yes, the long is not always bad but I would take the short on most the real long races anyday. One way to win on the long end is on the slow race, maybe the birds went off line, or maybe they started the wrong direction, or circled for a half hour or more. This gives a advantage to the long because if the birds on the long just keep flying the same speed as the birds on the short they will win. If the short end birds were off course or whatever for 30 minutes and it was a 2 hour race for them then they spent 25 percent of their race doing nothing. Now if the long end spent the same 30 minutes doing nothing and it was a 3 hour race for them then only 17 percnet of their time was waisted. So, all these birds could come into the area at the same time and be flying together when they went by the first lofts on the short and the long birds will win.
 

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I think being in the middle where I am is the worse place to be especially here on Long Island. I'm in the Long Island Combine and the combine is almost never won by anybody in the middle. With short enders being 50 miles shorter and long enders being 70 miles past me. My combine is narrow and long just like the island we fly a sw course and everybody is within 15 miles north to south and most the birds hit the island together but most of the time the winds shift or pick up when they get to the island. So if it's a head wind race they lose more time going out and on the blow homes they pick up time. They only way to get an even race where the guy in the middle has a shot is when it's really calm. Even though I do good in the middle on the fast races to win you need a bird way out in front of the birds who are going 10 miles or more past you caus they are gonna gain a lil time on you for every mile they are past you here as the winds seam to pick up the further you go out on the island.
 

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Sorry, Hogwash, i have heard that stuff all my Life. you Just need to train different. i was Short, all i heard was YADA< YADA< YADA<. I ignored it and trained my way. Funny, i did about as good at all distances.
Only thing that saved me was Training..Did i win? no. But my Free birds, had the Guys with the blood, REALLY on Edge... Dave
 

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I think there is a reason why those one loft races were invented so that we can have a little bit of "fairness."

There a lot of things that can happen more if your loft is on the longer side. I think it is just common sense that greater distances the bird would have to make is harder for that bird.
 

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Sorry, Hogwash, i have heard that stuff all my Life. you Just need to train different. i was Short, all i heard was YADA< YADA< YADA<. I ignored it and trained my way. Funny, i did about as good at all distances.
Only thing that saved me was Training..Did i win? no. But my Free birds, had the Guys with the blood, REALLY on Edge... Dave

It has nothing to do with the distance of the race if your a short ender in the 100 your a short ender in the 300. But your position has alot to do with winning a race. Especially when your in a combine with over 150 lofts and 2500 pigeons. In my combine there can be 20 seconds between 1st and 50th so if the birds are getting blown faster after they pass you they will pick up a few seconds every mile they go. And the same goes the other way if the wind blows faster in thier face as they pass you they will lose a few secs fro each mile. In this combine big packs of birds come accross and if get a bird out of the pack and they are picking up time they will beat you and if they are losing time you'll beat them so where you are makes a difference. But from what i've seen on alot of race sheets the short ender has an advantage overall.
 

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I am happy with my location and I am very long (within one mile of being out of our boundries) and offline about 10 miles. I like it but I also think if the wind blows offline the other direction than me it is not good and I think in our combine when people are flying 260 and I am 340 for yb's that I would like to be closer and it is hard to beat them shorter guys on a real long one like that for yb's. Location does effect your races somewhat like it or not. We have some old guys here in our club that are setting good and have been racing for a long time and they say "it don't matter where you are". Basically "location don't mean nothing" but at the annual metting just the mention of changing the course and they will jump right out of their chairs and start screaming.
 

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Perhaps more important than short or long is on the raceline or off. It seems to be a general principle that lofts on the raceline regardless of distance tend to be more succesful than those say, 30 miles or so to one side or the other. Pigeons are gregarious animals by nature. They tend to want to stay with the flock. I think that it is easier for a bird to be drawn away from their loft if the majority of the pack is coming down the raceline when their home is some 45 minutes or so to one side or the other. I think we would all agree that birds rarely come home in a perfectly straight line. They are probably influenced by many factors. (wind, conditions, terrain, etc.)

In our club we have one guy that is some 60 miles shorter than most of us. He seems to have more of an advantage on the longer races than the shorter ones. Perhaps his birds are more apt to overfly his loft on shorter races when they are more fresh. Perhaps that extra hour or more of flying for everyone else takes its toll more when the birds are more tired from longer races, who knows. Now, having said all that, he has great pigeons and is a great handler. How much of that is a factor? Probably more that his being so short.

Just my thoughts,

Dan
 

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questions

I believe Pixy got her answers:) .
I to enjoyed the reading and the slide show fit in to sum it all up. This thread show's how truly serious the sport of racing homing Pigeons really is. >kevin
 
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