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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey y'all, my first offspring from my recessive red male and my blue check female has yielded blue with quite a bit of black. I knew blue was coming 'as the the recessive red male bleeds through a bit, but black??? what does it all mean?? thanks!
 

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Carries The Recessive Gene

This youngster is the F1 offspring of a recessive red and a blue ck, it will be carring the recessive red gene. Now if you mated this bird to a blue bird carring the recessive gene you could get recessive young the ratio is 3:1 which neans that you will one RR, and one of the other 3 will be carring RR and the other two will be the wild type. If you mate this bird to A RECESSIVE RED you will 50% recessive and 50% blue carring the recessive red gene. I hope that I have not confused you but I wanted to let you know that this bird can be used to produce recessive reds GEORGE;)
 

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What black?

Hey y'all, my first offspring from my recessive red male and my blue check female has yielded blue with quite a bit of black. I knew blue was coming 'as the the recessive red male bleeds through a bit, but black??? what does it all mean?? thanks!
The bird is dark but as Becky says, may have dirty or smoky. The fact that you got a blue bar from a blue check tells you that your blue check hen is split for bar.

Getting a blue bar from a recessive red cock and blue check hen tells you that your recessive red cock is either blue based or ash red, split for blue. If he was ash red based and not split for blue, his babies from this hen would be ash reds. No matter what pattern he is, if he is check, spread or t pattern, he also carries bar or barless.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
great, that is awesome information. I wasn't asking for anything specific just wanted to get some info on the genetic makeup, which is exactly what you guys gave me. So what is the status of the black then, is it dominant, recessive, or what? also, is the recessive red sex linked, or can it be passed from father to daughter?
 

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So by black, you mean the dirty gene that's giving your bird a dark appearence, correct?
It's a dominate trait, in that it only needs one gene to show up. The blue check hen looks like she could be where this gene came from, but the dad may be more likely.
And recessive red isn't sex-linked. No matter what sex, the bird needs two copies of the RR gene for it to show.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ah i see, so the dirty gene could be masked by the recessive red. So in reference to the recessive red being sex linked, both hens and cocks from this pair will have the gene correct? Therefore if i mated the red cock's daughter to a recessive red about 50% of the offspring would be red, regardless of sex.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good stuff, i do have one more question though. the two squeakers are drastically different in size, is this due to sex (i.e the bigger one is the cock), or it is more a function of sibling rivalry?
 

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It could be either one. Depending on how close together the eggs hatched, the first could have gotten a little more food, but they usually level out in size pretty quickly. Or it could be sex, although it's not always 100% boys are bigger. And like you said, often times one will hog up all the food.
Another possibility is disease/parasites, which can really stunt their growth.
 
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