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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rescued a pigeon about two months ago. It is now about three months old and fully recovered, but now only has one eye.It has spent every day for the past two months on our balcony in a large cage surrounded by its family. I let it out of the cage four days ago and the other birds accepted it and it went off flying with them, but came back at night to its cage. The next day I let it out again, but things were different. Now the flock doesn't seem to accept it and it is alone. I'm not sure what to do. Can anyone help?
 

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Hi

When you say the flock does't seem to accept him and he's alone, what exactly is happening? Is he being attacked by other pigeons? Did he just not fly off with them again?

He will, at least for a while, be seeing your place as 'home' so may be reluctant to just go off with a flock completely. Also, a one-eyed bird is at quite a disadvantage in the outside world, particularly in failing to see a predator on his blind side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi and thanks for your reply.
On the first day I let the pigeon out the other pigeons accepted it into the flock. They all pecked at their food together, flew off together and generally hung around the rooves of the surrounding houses all day. Then my pigeon came back to the balcony alone and the rest of the pigeons had gone off to roost for the evening. The next day when I again released the pigeon the large male bird of the family (cockbird, hen and two juveniles) pecked at it and chased it away from the food. Since then the rest of the family seem to be ignoring it. This has continued for four days. Do you think it is too perilous for the bird to be free with only one eye? It seems so happy when out in the open, but I don't want it to succumb to a predator.
 

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Hi

There is usually some competition amongst pigeons for food, even when there is plenty for all. It is quite normal in our rescue aviary to see a more dominant pigeon try to chase others away from the food, though they do all end up with a full crop :). It is an instinctive thing, really. It is generally easier for a newbie to feed when there is a larger number of birds and sufficient food. In a 'family' group, the adults (usually, but not always, the male) will also defend against any pigeon who may be seen as a 'rival' if the perceived intruder is also male.

What you do really depends on whether you have facilities for a 'pet' pigeon where he can safely get exercise. Also depends on his attitude towards you - whether he sees you as parent and protector, or is stand-offish.
 

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I would never release a bird with just one eye.
 
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