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When do you retire a racer to the stock or breeding loft?
I guess the quick answer is whenever you feel you can no longer risk loosing a bird that has been successful for you. It will be different for different situations. Some people have bred specific birds to continue a family line that they need to continue, such as when the original breeder is getting old and they fear loosing the bird in the near future. In these cases the offspring's racing career may be cut short to get that bird's genes into the breeding loft. It just depends.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I guess the quick answer is whenever you feel you can no longer risk loosing a bird that has been successful for you. It will be different for different situations. Some people have bred specific birds to continue a family line that they need to continue, such as when the original breeder is getting old and they fear loosing the bird in the near future. In these cases the offspring's racing career may be cut short to get that bird's genes into the breeding loft. It just depends.

Dan
At what age would you see a racers performance start to decline? Or at what age should a racer stop being race?
 

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There are different opinions about these issues. I’ll give you two that I personally value most:
- After third year racing as second and third year are considered peek of performance.
- The moment you see that this bird is to good because it will be of more value as breeder then racer.
This of course depends of your priorities (racing or breeding), number of birds and intensity you train/race.
 

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When do you retire a racer to the stock or breeding loft?
As a young bird only racer, they are retired at the end of the YB racing season. The question becomes more of an issue with fanciers who race OB's. With every race, there is a risk of loss. Every OB fancier will have to make an evaluation as to the the risk vs. the reward. I am sure there are many fanciers out there that wished they would have not sent a bird, after he or she had a good racing career, but then in order to win one more diploma....lost the bird. Now, all they may have to show for it, are some diplomas.

Not every "good" racer will make a "good" breeder. But, as any experienced fancier will tell you, a "good" producer, which produces winners and breeders of winners, is much more important for long term success, then a "good" racer. Once your breeding loft contains race winners, which have produced winners, then you may be willing and able to continue to race a winner longer, and stack up the number of awards the bird has won.

But, if this racer produces some special offspring while on widowhood, it may be prudent to push up his "retirement" date. Where as if a racer has not produced offspring of note while on widowhood, it may make more sense to simply keep him racing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As a young bird only racer, they are retired at the end of the YB racing season. The question becomes more of an issue with fanciers who race OB's. With every race, there is a risk of loss. Every OB fancier will have to make an evaluation as to the the risk vs. the reward. I am sure there are many fanciers out there that wished they would have not sent a bird, after he or she had a good racing career, but then in order to win one more diploma....lost the bird. Now, all they may have to show for it, are some diplomas.

Not every "good" racer will make a "good" breeder. But, as any experienced fancier will tell you, a "good" producer, which produces winners and breeders of winners, is much more important for long term success, then a "good" racer. Once your breeding loft contains race winners, which have produced winners, then you may be willing and able to continue to race a winner longer, and stack up the number of awards the bird has won.

But, if this racer produces some special offspring while on widowhood, it may be prudent to push up his "retirement" date. Where as if a racer has not produced offspring of note while on widowhood, it may make more sense to simply keep him racing.
What if you do not have room in the breeding loft for the widowhood pair that is producing good birds. Also what if your breeding loft is also filled with birds of that kind of caliber. What would you do? I am not saying I have birds like that, but I just wanted to know what would you do.
 

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What if you do not have room in the breeding loft for the widowhood pair that is producing good birds. Also what if your breeding loft is also filled with birds of that kind of caliber. What would you do? I am not saying I have birds like that, but I just wanted to know what would you do.
You do what the Great Master Ludo Claessen did, you remove some of those good proven winners and producers to make room for birds which hopefully will produce even better. You have to use all that you have learned over the years, all of your stock sense, and select some to go....and some to stay.....in time, your choices will determine how great of a fancier you are to become. Good race and breeding records may be a helpful tool, but when it comes right down to it, your ability, or inability to select those to carry on the strain will determine your destiny within the sport.
 
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