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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the past few weeks one of my birds which hatched last summer has began to roll down. I have observed him in action twice. Once he rolled into the brush and once landed in the snow. It appears to be unharmed. I have not seen this for many years. In the past I have breed them with normal rollers under the advice that it would deepen the roll of their offspring. My experience has been more "roll down" offspring. I am interested in anyone's comments that actually have had experience with roll down birds. Bill
 

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Hello. Zippy, you are correct because Bill was not exactly describing his breeds. So Rafael was only assuming that one of Bill's roll down birds' parent may be a parlor roller.
My comment was to help Bill fix his future offspring so they do not fall from the sky.
Zippy: what birds do you fly? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the comments so far. The bird I am talking about is a Birmingham Roller. I believe this phenomena is genetically inherited, but surprised to see it show up in my loft. Especially since I have not seen it in any of these birds before and I have had them for several generations.
 

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I have not seen many families of Birmingham Rollers that will not breed some rolldowns.

I have seen them two to three years old and stable, and suddenly not be able to stay in the air. Rolling is genetically inherited, but rolling down can be a sign of illness or poor condition. I have heard of people leaning out the birds for competition day and having half of them hit when coming out of the kit box.
 

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I keep birmingham rollers, and parlor rollers.. two completely different breeds. parlors have thicker bones and frame, are squat and tails more wedge shaped. no one who has seen together can confuse them or crossed offspring for performance Birmingham rollers.
that said roll downs can occur naturlly at that age of true maturity. even though birms can breed at six months, they take longer to fully mature and show rolldowns more at that age.
rolldowns can be otherwise feed, water, sun, heat, cold, wind, parasites, to much loft or too little loft/ kit box space, to much or too little flying, eyc.

how are your birds eyes or what are your birds eye signs? One or both: bull, split, etc???
Eye sign in rollers can tell you some about the bird.

DON'T CULL IT YET, just stock for now, as some get best compatition Birmingham rollers from one or both rool downs. just don't only or keep breeding only or from only roll downs or you do eventually get parlor type birds. lol
 
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