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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two of the birds which I purchased which will be breeders and prisoners are getting pretty friendly with each other. Here is my question: should I separate the cocks and hens until breeding season, let them play house and replace their eggs with dummies, or what? Thanks, Don.
 

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my opinion is seperate cocks from hen till your ready to breed them, thats how i do it... and i wont worry putting some dummy eggs.. hope this help
 
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I agree if you dont plan on breeding them and you have seperate pens for cocks an hens then I would seperate them now , it gives them a break from the cocks driving them constantly an wearing them out ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much. I didn't know what to do. I guess I will break the romance up.
 

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Separating them is good because the hen might stop laying eggs. Because I have no separation space my breeders make eggs nonstop the whole year.
 

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If you are planning on racing these birds in the fall, these little love affairs can be used to your advantage. I would separate them and then let them together for several hours after each training toss. This becomes a sort of modified widowhood system and can motivate the birds to come home faster if they know their mate is waiting for them when they get home.

Dan
 

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bbcon

If these are young birds that have never bred, it is sometimes wise to let them build a nest and lay eggs and even go through the process of raising youngsters at least once. Now before everyone yells at me, the reason I say this is that unbred yearing hens and cocks sometimes have no clue about housekeeping and feeding young. If they make a mistake like not setting the eggs long enough, or not defending their nest resulting in abandoned or broken eggs or trampled babies, then the loss is not as critical as it is during breeding season. If you wait until the normal breeding season and they make these mistakes then you have lost valuable rounds of youngsters to add to your team if you are planning on racing. If you do decide to let them breed and they raise some youngsters, now you have a few youngsters to learn how to settle and trap train and make your mistakes with these rather than your first youngbird team. I'm not trying to insult you by saying you will make mistakes. First time flyers are always going to make mistakes with their birds at some time or another, we all have! If someone tells you differnet then they may be pulling your leg a bit. So, there you have my 2 cents worth if that's worth anything!

Ralph
 

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I agree with pigeon racer. I just finished my first year in April and I cannot tell you all the learning experiences, (mistakes), my birds had to suffer from. First time breeders also make mistakes, so let them gain experience with dummy eggs.

There is a lot to learn but you sir are doing it the right way. Keep asking your questions here and pick the answer that best suits your needs.

God Bless,
Tony
 

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If you are planning on racing these birds in the fall, these little love affairs can be used to your advantage. I would separate them and then let them together for several hours after each training toss. This becomes a sort of modified widowhood system and can motivate the birds to come home faster if they know their mate is waiting for them when they get home.

Dan
Hey Dan !! :eek:

What are you doing ? Giving away "Secrets" like this ?!......:rolleyes:
 

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If it was me, I would let that pair raise a round. Even if you decide not to keep the young, letting the love birds raise one will make them happier.
 

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bbcon

If these are young birds that have never bred, it is sometimes wise to let them build a nest and lay eggs and even go through the process of raising youngsters at least once. Now before everyone yells at me, the reason I say this is that unbred yearing hens and cocks sometimes have no clue about housekeeping and feeding young. If they make a mistake like not setting the eggs long enough, or not defending their nest resulting in abandoned or broken eggs or trampled babies, then the loss is not as critical as it is during breeding season. If you wait until the normal breeding season and they make these mistakes then you have lost valuable rounds of youngsters to add to your team if you are planning on racing. If you do decide to let them breed and they raise some youngsters, now you have a few youngsters to learn how to settle and trap train and make your mistakes with these rather than your first youngbird team. I'm not trying to insult you by saying you will make mistakes. First time flyers are always going to make mistakes with their birds at some time or another, we all have! If someone tells you differnet then they may be pulling your leg a bit. So, there you have my 2 cents worth if that's worth anything!

Ralph
Hi RALPH, Very good advice, the only thing that I would add is let them raise only one youngster GEORGE;)
 
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