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I have some breeding boxes and was wanting to know what is best to use . Pine shavings or cat litter. I knew a guy that used cat litter all the time and had no problems. What do PT think ?

Barn Pigeon aka The Great Whites. ;)
 

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I've used shavings before and that's worked fine. I've always had the fear that my birds will eat the cat litter so I stayed away from that. Also, some fanciers use corn stalks; they cut it up so it's fine then put it in.
 

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Tobacco stalks are also good for keeping the bugs away in nests

John
 

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I use a product called stall dry for horse stalls, it is about the same as a natural non clumping cat litter made out of clay and Diatomaceous Earth , but it is low dust, it absorbs alot of moisture and keeps weight in the nest bowl as I use the paper ones..I put that in the bottom and then some pine shavings on top, and then let them do the rest with some hay or pine needles... using ceder is questionable due to it being irritating to the respitory system...I have used in small quanities after it has been aired without any problems. as far as the stall dry goes you can use non clumping cat litter as it is about the same thing.
 

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I use red cedar shaving that you can get from Walmart its about $6.00 you can find it at the pet section, like Southtown said it control external pest and also add some aromatic smell to your loft. Some people says it will cost respiratory infection but I never have the problem in my loft specially the young birds just replace your nest bowl in a timely manner never let dropping build up and keep dust to a minimum.
 

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Regular Cat Litter made from Fired Clay, only is what I've used for at least the last 30yrs. & works great in the nest bowls....... Don't worry when they eat some of it, as it doesn't hurt them at all...... Just make sure it has nothing else in the bag for smell etc..... I get mine at Walmart in 20lb. Yellow bags.. Works for me!!!!! Happy
 

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I've used shavings before and that's worked fine. I've always had the fear that my birds will eat the cat litter so I stayed away from that. Also, some fanciers use corn stalks; they cut it up so it's fine then put it in.
We use the the crush corncob, the only down side to me is it will stick to your shoes and may get tracked in the house and for sure all outside the loft...with all the snow and wet weather we have had it has been worst, now that the snow/ice is melting i see i have the cob everywhere outside of my loft. I am considering using something different but not sure what...i dont put the crushed cob in the nestbowls or boxes, have never heard of putting anything like that in there before until now.
 

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I say shavings!
 

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Article about different bedding materials. Interesting.

Corn Cobs - Once ingested, corn cobs can remain in the body for years before causing illness or death. Ingested corn cobs absorb moisture and swell, which can cause impaction, bleeding and death. Baby birds can also develop bacteria and yeast infections from the ingested material. When wet or in humid climates, cobs can grow Aspergillus molds which cause a respiratory disease in birds. This disease is difficult to treat and can be fatal. The cobs will also absorb moisture from your bird's droppings, promoting growth of organisms and hiding loose poops. It's a poor material for examining droppings.

http://www.birdsnways.com/wisdom/ww12eiii.htm
 

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Article about different bedding materials. Interesting.

Corn Cobs - Once ingested, corn cobs can remain in the body for years before causing illness or death. Ingested corn cobs absorb moisture and swell, which can cause impaction, bleeding and death. Baby birds can also develop bacteria and yeast infections from the ingested material. When wet or in humid climates, cobs can grow Aspergillus molds which cause a respiratory disease in birds. This disease is difficult to treat and can be fatal. The cobs will also absorb moisture from your bird's droppings, promoting growth of organisms and hiding loose poops. It's a poor material for examining droppings.

http://www.birdsnways.com/wisdom/ww12eiii.htm
yeah I heard that awhile back and stayed away from them..they are hard too..never liked them... bacteria can get into just about anything..that is why I like the clay litter idea, it takes moisture away and you dump it out and start anew....guess one would do the same with the corn bedding as well......
 

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yeah I heard that awhile back and stayed away from them..they are hard too..never liked them... bacteria can get into just about anything..that is why I like the clay litter idea, it takes moisture away and you dump it out and start anew....guess one would do the same with the corn bedding as well......
But the clay, as long as it isn't the clumping kind shouldn't hurt them if they eat a little. The corncob can apparently kill them if they eat it.:(
 

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Article about different bedding materials. Interesting.

Corn Cobs - Once ingested, corn cobs can remain in the body for years before causing illness or death. Ingested corn cobs absorb moisture and swell, which can cause impaction, bleeding and death. Baby birds can also develop bacteria and yeast infections from the ingested material. When wet or in humid climates, cobs can grow Aspergillus molds which cause a respiratory disease in birds. This disease is difficult to treat and can be fatal. The cobs will also absorb moisture from your bird's droppings, promoting growth of organisms and hiding loose poops. It's a poor material for examining droppings.

http://www.birdsnways.com/wisdom/ww12eiii.htm
Thats good to know, i had no idea. Thanks for passing this along. Now I just read the article and the only thing it considered to be safe was newspaper shavings....after reading this there does not seem to be anything you can use that does not have a potential danger....for now i am going to stick with my corncobs.
 

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But the clay, as long as it isn't the clumping kind shouldn't hurt them if they eat a little. The corncob can apparently kill them if they eat it.:(
oh forgot about that part... I have poop on the brain..lol...
yeah does'nt sound good...perhaps it could be a source of the mysteriouse illnesses folks can't figure out..never know..:)
 

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I tried the suggestion about plain clay cat litter. EVERY "plain" clay cat litter I bought had those little colored "deodorizing things" in it! I tried like 4 different brands and finally gave up - they ALL had them in it! I was afraid the birds would eat them :eek:
I even checked the ingredients on the bags before I bought them - they ALL said "100% clay" - so what are those little "colored things" mixed in?
 

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When you look at all the different nesting materials, and read about the hazards of each, then I guess you just have to go with the one that seems less menacing. I use straw, but that can harbor insects because it is hollow, and aspergillus if it gets wet, although I change the nests out to keep them clean. But I have no way of knowing if the hay picked it up BEFORE I bought it. I lately have been buying Timothy hay at the Pet store near hear. I can get a large bag for about $10, but that is still expensive if you have lots of birds. I wish we had the long pine needles around here.
 

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I tried the suggestion about plain clay cat litter. EVERY "plain" clay cat litter I bought had those little colored "deodorizing things" in it! I tried like 4 different brands and finally gave up - they ALL had them in it! I was afraid the birds would eat them :eek:
I even checked the ingredients on the bags before I bought them - they ALL said "100% clay" - so what are those little "colored things" mixed in?
I don't know, but I'd be afraid they'd eat them too. You can't win.
 
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