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Hi - have a pigeon who is ill, don't know what to do. Have been feeding about fifty pigeons on the roof outside the window of my computer room for two years, and this year some of the young pigeons decided it was okay to come in the window and hang out (there are always some spilled seeds on the floor). This morning one of them came in sat on my desk, fluffed up her feathers and tucked her head into them. At one point she jumped down on the floor and pecked at some seeds, but only halfheartedly. Also, a membrane kept coming up over her eyes (which is a sign of illness in cats). I had to go out, and when I came back, she was still sitting there hunched up, and shivering occasionally. She was easy to catch, not interested in flying (but she's not injured, not obviously, anyway). Got her a box, put some water and food (small seeds) in it. Think she ate some; they were disturbed, anyway. Decided to try to give her water in a syringe - she must have been really dehydrated - drank five full syringes. She perked up after that, but she's still not behaving like a normal pigeon. (The rest of them fly around, fight, eat a few seeds, poke around a bit and then go back outside.) Advice, please!
 

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Welcome to PT . You must get ahold of the pigeon and not allow him to fly out. I hope he will be back.

Five syringes of water it's too much.

Please follow the instructions first link and afterwards the handfeeding deforsted peas

http://www.pigeons.biz/forums/f108/basic-steps-to-saving-the-life-of-a-pigeon-or-dove-8822.html

Here are some prewritten feeding instruction...

You can hand feed defrosted peas. Run some hot water over them until they are defrosted and slightly warmed. Put the bird on your lap and hold it next to your body. If it helps because you are having a hard time handling the pigeon, you can wrap a towel around it or put it in the sleeve of a tee shirt, with the head out the wrist. This method confines the pigeon without hurting him and makes it easier to handle. Gently open the beak and pop a pea at the back of the mouth and over the throat. It gets easier and faster, with practice, for both you and the bird.
You will need to feed 30-50 per feeding [depending on the size of the pigeon] and every time the crop empties until you know the baby is eating on his own. After a couple of feedings, most squeakers get the hang of it, pick up the peas on their own and naturally transition into a seed diet.
This is a wonderful method for teaching babies to eat because they feel the whole food in their mouth and it’s soft and easy to pick up and hang on to.
The crop is located right below the throat and with food it fills up like a little balloon. The peas make the crop feel lumpy and squishy.
 

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Thanks for getting back to me so quickly, Dima. I have the pigeon; just transferred her from the box to roomy dog kennel (daughter dropped it off - she runs a no-kill cat and dog rescue). She's asleep now, I think (after midnight here).

Will get peas first thing tomorrow (heard her rummaging around in the seed dish a while ago, though). How much water should she have? She's a young adult, not a baby.

Have put in a call to the only small bird rescue in the province - am hoping they will take her. But I don't know if they deal with pigeons. No one in my city looks after birds, and I have no experience with them. There are no local vets specializing in birds - took an injured pigeon to the vet last spring (cat caught him, had a puncture wound in his back) - all the clinics are reluctant to treat birds, this one was no exception. The pigeon spent ten days at the clinic and it cost me seven hundred dollars. (He survived, which is the main thing.) Had to scrape up the money then, can't possibly do it now. None of the vets will do any pro bono work for any of the animal charities, or individual clients. The only thing I have going for me is that my sister is a doctor so I could get a prescription for the pigeon without having to go to a vet.

But I don't know what's wrong with her - what symptoms should I be looking out for? And she's so small - small creatures can do downhill fast if they don't get treated quickly and properly (have successfully looked after abandoned four-week-old kittens, but it was touch and go). She seems fairly alert.

Also, how do I get her mouth open to pop in the peas - and check for canker?
 

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Hi Susan,
I think i misundestood that the bird flew. I am happy you still have it.

Can you please gently open her beak and observe if there's yellow stuff in the throat of the bird; also could you smell when you open and tell us if it smells bad. She is a youngster and young birds are prone to illness called Canker. Can you tell us how is her poop ( from the poop one can tell if a bird is healthy or not); if it's like diarrhea it's not good : A picture would be great.
 

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Wow..so sorry they ripped you off; so expensive 700dollars:eek: for a puncture; i bet vet gave you antibiotics and ointment. But i am happy the bird survived.
But i am also happy you can get meds. easily.
It's not hard to open her beak. Do not be affraid if she struggles, which she most likely will. Look at the video but because your bird is wild put a big towel on your lap, then put the bird on your lap, fold the tolwel over her letting the head out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uU1SO0ZJoow

Good luck.:D

don't forget to check for cheesy, smelly mouth
 
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