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My baby bird is 6 weeks old and i have started handleing him since about 4 weeks and he flys around, but he wont come to me:(

Im trying to get him super tame, i need to now how to train him:confused:

And i also need tricks to make him like an animal people will see is plays, weddings, or at a carnival:D

Please help
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West of Summerville
 

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My baby bird is 6 weeks old and i have started handleing him since about 4 weeks and he flys around, but he wont come to me:(

Im trying to get him super tame, i need to now how to train him:confused:

And i also need tricks to make him like an animal people will see is plays, weddings, or at a carnival:D

Please help
Friend me
West of Summerville
Pigeons are NOT like cats or dogs or circus animals that you can TRAIN to do certain tricks to amuse people.
They will do things that THEY want to do, and only WHEN & IF they want to do them.
Each and every bird has its own personality which, if observed carefully, one can see what they like to do and it is sometimes then possible to build on that by rewarding them with treats etc.
Offering treats in your hand is usually a good way to start getting them to come to you, but it is not instant, and can sometimes take weeks for them even to approach you.
Keeping birds hungry just to perform is not a good way to try and train a pet. It works for certain breeds like trianing homers to come back to a loft, but a lone hungry bird will not eat if it is frightened.
Most birds, even hand raised ones, do not like to be handled.
They see a humans hands as a predator and as a totally different being from the actual person they belong to.
It is possible with a great deal of patience for them to accept and trust ones hands as something that is not going to harm them, but as soon as you do something sudden or against what they want, then any trust they have is lost.
 

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Most birds, even hand raised ones, do not like to be handled.
They see a humans hands as a predator and as a totally different being from the actual person they belong to.
It is possible with a great deal of patience for them to accept and trust ones hands as something that is not going to harm them, but as soon as you do something sudden or against what they want, then any trust they have is lost.
I think your being way to absolute in your statement and i disagree. I dont think you can speak for the all the pet pigeons out there. I didnt take me a great deal of patience nor do i think the relationship is as fragile as you make it sound. atleast in my case.
 

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Keeping birds hungry just to perform is not a good way to try and train a pet.
I agree. Access to food should never be conditional on the pet's behavior. Reward the pigeon with treats for behaviors you want to encourage, but don't try to mold it's behavior by keeping it hungry. Being always able to rely on food is part of the package that makes the bird trusting and conformable in your home, so your home feels like its home too.
 

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I didn't say starve it and I train raceing pigeons I feed mine when they come in from loft flying or training tosses this teaches them when i whistle they need to trap in so they can eat. If they don't learn this they won't win races also when they are loft flying and a hawk comes around I can call them in and they don't become someones dinner
 

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I think your being way to absolute in your statement and i disagree. I dont think you can speak for the all the pet pigeons out there. I didnt take me a great deal of patience nor do i think the relationship is as fragile as you make it sound. atleast in my case.
Read the very first word in my comment - MOST.
Every bird has its own personality, and every owner also has theirs when around the birds.
Take two people and two birds get the people to follow exactly the same training routine under same circumstances & I guarantee you the birds will respond dfferently. They may both get there in the end or they may not.
Birds, like all animals (including humans) can pick up on mannerisms and movements and use these in their build up of trust of the person.
What is acceptable to one bird may be entirely opposite in another.
They also take cues from other birds, and even a tame bird can behave differently to trained or learned responses when another bird is around.


I didn't say starve it and I train raceing pigeons I feed mine when they come in from loft flying or training tosses this teaches them when i whistle they need to trap in so they can eat. If they don't learn this they won't win races also when they are loft flying and a hawk comes around I can call them in and they don't become someones dinner
As I metioned -
.... It works for certain breeds like training homers to come back to a loft, but a lone hungry bird will not eat if it is frightened.
However, training to come back to a loft & training to do tricks are totally different things.
 

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I think your being way to absolute in your statement and i disagree. I dont think you can speak for the all the pet pigeons out there. I didnt take me a great deal of patience nor do i think the relationship is as fragile as you make it sound. atleast in my case.
I agree completely. DeeDee isn't a pigeon, he's a ringneck dove, but we routinely "grab" him from above if we want to take him out of the cage while the ceiling fan is on so we can take him to the bathroom. We do that when he's driving us nuts with his incessant cooing while we're trying to watch tv or when we're on the phone. He's used to it: he doesn't LIKE it, but he knows we're not going to hurt him. It doesn't faze him in the least when it comes to trusting us. He still comes to us, sits on our heads, shoulders, preens our hands and feet, etc. He still trusts us and loves us. We haven't really done much of anything to "train" him to do anything, but he will often come when we clap our hands, or when we wave this strip of sparkly material he loves, or if we shake some food in a dish. I think it just depends on the bird. I don't think there is any one way of "training" anything, from dogs to birds. You just need to figure out what the bird likes and use that as encouragement. Just like we, with DeeDee, shake an envelope at him to tell him to be quiet (which works for about two minutes, if we're lucky). Hubby used to swat him with the envelope if he was being obnoxiously loud. Kind of like a wing slap, I suppose. Now, it just takes a snap of the envelope in the air from across the room, and he quiets down for a few minutes anyway. If that doesn't work, we go over and snatch him up and give him a "time out" in the bathroom.

He has US pretty well trained, though. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #10
i would like to teach him how to come back to me by whistol
and as quazer said
Every bird has its own personality
he has a sweet personality when he is alone but he is totally scared of me when he is out side
 

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Reasoning

I wouldn't recommend training your bird for the circus, or to amuse other people. If that is your goal, then you would be better off giving it away instead. Taming your bird is going to take commitment and patience. You should spend a lot of time around your bird so that he/she will become used to you. You can also try hand-feeding the bird. Simply remove the feed dish when you need to refill it, but instead place your hand in the cage with seed and make no sudden movements. There are many ways to tame a bird, but your reasoning lacks certain requirements.
 
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