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I have a hatchling that is developing a splayed leg. I have treated it by binding it's legs as described in several threads on this site. For the most part it's worked and as long as he's sitting normally his legs both sit under his body. But when he trys to move towards his parents at feeding, he'll push his legs out behind him and end up leaving them both sticking straight back. Can anyone lend some advice?
Thanks,
Randy
 

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You need to mobilize the bird so that it doesn't move at all, once its bone are strong enough then the splayed leg should go away, but avoid making the birds go out of the nest or moved around put it in small container were the birds can't move around and his legs are under his body.
 

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I had this happen with some of mine. If their legs stay mispositioned in anyway for any length of time it really seems to mess them up.
I even had problems with that when I was able to put the birds in a small container, so that their legs shouldn't have been able to go anywhere besides under them.

You can try binding the legs together further up on the leg, and see if that keeps them both in place. I'm honestly not really sure right now what I ended up doing that worked. But it was difficult. I really seemed like by attaching the good leg to the bad leg, I was only making the good leg worse at times.

You can try wrapping the whole back end of the bird, so long as it stays upright.

I'm also not sure how much the parents are going to pic at any modifications you install on their chick.


One useful thing I can mention is to be very cautious of circulation problems. Even something like vet wrap can cause big problems. When you put something on the leg, I would suggest changing it twice a day. It isn't enough to look at it, I think you need to be able to take the wrap completely off to inspect the leg.

The wraps can constrict much more than you think, and on occasion other things may happen. Once the wrap tightened and the leg swelled so much that I had to cut it off, and I cut the chick a little too.

Twice I had individual fibers from the vet wrap come lose, and constrict the leg of one of my chicks. The binding in general wasn't constricting, just one individual fiber that would come free.

The wrap also shifted down too low once, and caused the chick to walk on the back of his hind toe for a while. Then I had to add another foot wrap to straiten the back toes out. Sadly, the skin of one toe constricted further. I was afraid it was going to have to be amputated. But over the course of the chicks development I was able to keep cutting the ring of constricted tissue and keep circulation.

That chick had so many leg problems, and a lot of them were caused by the treatment for the original problem. Just remember that even loosely wrapped gauze can cause some serious problems, even when you are doing your best not to constrict the leg.

The chick turned out fine by the way.
Now I like to use... elastic scrunchies. Not sure if that is the name of it. It is the little band that girls use to put their hair in ponytails etc. They are cheap, and come in a variety of appropriate sizes. I put it around the legs, and put a piece of tape in the middle to form a figure 8.
I like them because they exert pressure, but can also roll around a little bit and don't seem to constrict one specific area very heavily. They are also much easier to put on and take off.
 

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last baby i had i noticed it just starting so i took a piece of soft cotton thin rope and tied it to one ankle loosely and then i tied the other end to the other ankle with only enough string in between so it kept her legs close enough together in thier natural position.
she was still able to walk around just fine and could stay with her parents and sibling.
i left it on about a week.
i also made sure her nest had enough stuff in as to not be slippery
 
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