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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone

I have a more than a month old squab born to two handicapped pigeons of mine. Only one egg hatched, the other one went bad. The parents fed the baby for a while, but later they were more interested in fighting and courting than in the baby. Meanwhile, the baby started feeding on his own. For a few days, I noticed that the baby was always lying down. When I brought him in, I found he is unable to stand. The legs seem weak and he is using his wings as crutches to move around. I have started him on calcium + D3. Anything else I can do to help him use his legs and build his strength? His tail feathers are also malformed, and he is generally thin. He is alert and eating, but prefers to sit all the time because of his weak legs. Will this get better with the calcium supplementation?

Many thanks in advance for all help.
 

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Are the legs splayed out? Or just weak?
Do the parents get calcium/vit. D?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I checked the internet for images and videos of splaying, and from the look of it, his legs do not look splayed. There is no turned out leg sticking out. The legs are weak. The parents dido not get calcium, but I have started supplementation after I noticed the problem with the baby.
Will this result in a permanent weakness of the legs?
 

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Even the parents need the calcium/D3. They need it for themselves, especially the hen who uses up her calcium to produce the eggs. If she doesn't get enough then she will become very ill eventually and can die. If the parents who feed the baby are not getting it, then neither is the baby. Calcium and D3 are very important for nerves, bones, and muscles to develop properly and grow strong. You need it, and so do your birds.
It should help if given now, and shouldn't have a permanent effect on the legs.
Calcium can be over done also, which is just as bad. So go by the directions on the supplement.

If you keep any animal, it is up to you to go and read and find out what their needs are, since you are responsible for fulfilling those needs.
 

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Not until they are strong enough to support him. You could try to help him exercise them by gently bringing them in and out. You know, straighten them, then bend them back in to a sitting position. You don't want them to become frozen as they are. But don't force them. Do this very gently. It will take time for him to build the strength in them. And if he has never walked, this could take time. Also, walking the way he does is now what he knows. So be patient. The earlier you fix a problem, the better it goes, and the easier it is fixed.

If he is too thin, or isn't eating enough, you should have been supplementing him with hand feedings. Frozen peas which have been defrosted under warm running water, to nice and warm, but not hot would be good to supplement him with. Here's how:

If you need to feed peas to a pigeon, hold the bird on your lap and against your body. This gives you more control. Reach from behind his head with one hand and grasp his beak on either side. Now use your free hand to open the beak, and put a pea in, then push it to the back of his throat and over his tongue. Let him close his beak and swallow. Then do another. It gets easier with practice, and the bird also gets more used to it, and won't fight as much. If you can't handle the bird, then use the sleeve cut off a t-shirt, slip it over his head and onto his body, with his head sticking out. This will stop him from being able to fight you so much. Just don't make it tight around his crop area. It helps if you have him facing your right side if you are right handed.
 
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