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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
last night while looking at my youngsters (5 days old) i noticed one has a deformed wing, he/she has a realy short stumpy wing on one side i can see this as being problematic for him/her in later life, has any one else had this occour and what precautions/steps should i take to help this youngster out?
is there any liklyhood that this bird will fly?
will post a pic when its light again
 

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Hard to say if he will fly or not. Still, the bird can have a happy life.
 

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Chances are that it's a developmental abnormality and he will likely never fly. It may live but it will be a floor runner most likely so you need to provide a ramp for it to come and go thru the loft, have food and water down low - or keep it in a separate hutch/cage with a ramp to let it in and out if you want. If it's a male, depending on the amount of wing left it may or may not be able to mount a hen to breed. If it's a female and only the wing is affected (and nothing internal) then it should be able to mate and breed with no problem. Since pigeons can live 10-15 years, you have to determine whether you want to deal with the challenges for that length of time; whether you want to let it go to someone who is willing to deal with them over time; or whether you wish to put it down now.
 

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No Bluecheck...we don't advocate putting birds down for that reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
nope its not an option at my loft :)
i have enough moral trouble culling any mice that venture in the loft,
i have to many hand reared birds as it is so i will let the forces of nature work with this one and give it the best life i can :)
 

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Somehow, I knew that would be your answer.
 

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nope its not an option at my loft :)
i have enough moral trouble culling any mice that venture in the loft,
i have to many hand reared birds as it is so i will let the forces of nature work with this one and give it the best life i can :)

good for you!perhaps you can make some adaptions for him once hes a bit bigger and extent of deformity becomes more aparent,i have an old friend whos cockateil(charlie)has similar,this guy obv cant fly but hops round and manages well,he has a lady friend and they get on just fine!
 

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adapt to -- disabilities. Consider, for example, the case of an 11-year-old cockatoo that lost her beak in a fight, or the countless number of birds that either lose a wing by accident or, domesticated, have their wings clipped.

While some instances of bird injuries are treatable, the natural way of healing and adapting is sometimes more effective. Dr. Greg Harrison, DVM, notes that, “While long-term success with prosthetic beaks has not proven to be effective, birds do learn to adapt and learn to eat both without the upper beak, and with a fractured lower beak.”

Peter Dubacher, founder of the Berkshire Bird Paradise, a rescue in New York, agrees that while there are instances where a bird needs treatment, not all need the same attention. “Missing part of a wing is not going to distract a bird from eating and living,” Dubacher said. “I have bald eagles that are missing wings and doing fine -- and, beyond that, another that survived the Exxon Valdez oil spill. She’s still having babies.”

There are now approximately 120 bird rescue organizations throughout the country, mainly for parrots. National organizations, such as The Avian Welfare Coalition, also seek to raise general awareness about the plight of parrots and other captive birds and to serve as an educational resource for the humane community, lawmakers and the general public.

found this!may be of some help
 

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Folks, you may not advocate putting birds down for any reason. The breeder chooses not to do so, and that's fine. However, I have an ethical obligation when someone asks to provide all possible options and putting a bird down that will not have a life that is liveable is one. The breeder is in New Zealand. She chooses to raise the bird. Great. What if she couldn't take on 10-15 years of care. Do we rear a bird to weaning and then toss it on the ground and let it slowly starve to death? Do we toss it out and let "nature take its course." I understand many here wish to rear everything. Do it. It's your loft and your feed. However, if and when it's better to put the bird down, do that too. And if that offends some of your sensibilities, so be it. Its better for the animal.
 

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Folks, you may not advocate putting birds down for any reason. The breeder chooses not to do so, and that's fine. However, I have an ethical obligation when someone asks to provide all possible options and putting a bird down that will not have a life that is liveable is one. The breeder is in New Zealand. She chooses to raise the bird. Great. What if she couldn't take on 10-15 years of care. Do we rear a bird to weaning and then toss it on the ground and let it slowly starve to death? Do we toss it out and let "nature take its course." I understand many here wish to rear everything. Do it. It's your loft and your feed. However, if and when it's better to put the bird down, do that too. And if that offends some of your sensibilities, so be it. Its better for the animal.

It's against the rules here to talk about culling.
 

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It's against the rules here to talk about culling.
It IS, however, I don't think that was what Bluecheck was saying .. I think he was saying that if you can handle it .. do it .. if you can't put it to sleep. There is sadly a lot of wisdom in his post.

I got in a juvenile Mourning Dove today that had fallen or been booted from the nest twice. When the little bird got here, it was clear that there was NO HOPE for the little one in the wild. Both legs are splayed 90 degrees from the body. My friend and I have taped and are hoping for a good outcome even though the little bird will have to be transferred tomorrow .. we've already done all the "leg" work. If our tape job isn't good enough and IF the rehabber doesn't think there is any hope, then this little one will be euthanized. I've done what I could, but sometimes, you've got to deal with the hard realities.

Terry
 

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It IS, however, I don't think that was what Bluecheck was saying .. I think he was saying that if you can handle it .. do it .. if you can't put it to sleep. There is sadly a lot of wisdom in his post.

I got in a juvenile Mourning Dove today that had fallen or been booted from the nest twice. When the little bird got here, it was clear that there was NO HOPE for the little one in the wild. Both legs are splayed 90 degrees from the body. My friend and I have taped and are hoping for a good outcome even though the little bird will have to be transferred tomorrow .. we've already done all the "leg" work. If our tape job isn't good enough and IF the rehabber doesn't think there is any hope, then this little one will be euthanized. I've done what I could, but sometimes, you've got to deal with the hard realities.

Terry
Well said Terry. Like you said, Bluecheck was not advocating the process just presenting it as an ethical option in some circustances. We just won't dwell on the topic.

Dan
 

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It IS, however, I don't think that was what Bluecheck was saying .. I think he was saying that if you can handle it .. do it .. if you can't put it to sleep. There is sadly a lot of wisdom in his post.

I got in a juvenile Mourning Dove today that had fallen or been booted from the nest twice. When the little bird got here, it was clear that there was NO HOPE for the little one in the wild. Both legs are splayed 90 degrees from the body. My friend and I have taped and are hoping for a good outcome even though the little bird will have to be transferred tomorrow .. we've already done all the "leg" work. If our tape job isn't good enough and IF the rehabber doesn't think there is any hope, then this little one will be euthanized. I've done what I could, but sometimes, you've got to deal with the hard realities.

Terry
I DO understand your point Terry. I understand hard decisions. The post was not about your little morning Dove but rather a little deformed bird that really hasn't had the opportunity to see how it will handle the deformity it was hatched with. If it turns out the bird has NO quality of life that's one thing although not My choice Bluecheck's or Yours. I think our member is Wise enough to know what is best for the bird based upon quality of life and just how she is able to extend herself to the bird's coping with the outcome of the disabilities. We want members and those seeking advise/opinions to make well thought, wise, decisions regarding the taking another creature's life.
We needn't be so quick to offer ethical advise without giving any creature a chance.
 

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Chances are that it's a developmental abnormality and he will likely never fly. It may live but it will be a floor runner most likely so you need to provide a ramp for it to come and go thru the loft, have food and water down low - or keep it in a separate hutch/cage with a ramp to let it in and out if you want. If it's a male, depending on the amount of wing left it may or may not be able to mount a hen to breed. If it's a female and only the wing is affected (and nothing internal) then it should be able to mate and breed with no problem. Since pigeons can live 10-15 years, you have to determine whether you want to deal with the challenges for that length of time; whether you want to let it go to someone who is willing to deal with them over time; or whether you wish to put it down now.
Under the circumstances (a simple wing deformity), I think this was excellent advise - up until the last sentence.
I agree that if it affects the quality of life (they have no ability to move or eat) then one has a tough decision to make. I'm sure we've all had to make that terrible decision at one time or another.
But I think the point is - this is a simple deformity that one can live with. Handicap birds aren't difficult to deal with. One just has to make some small modifications and they live happily with the flock (at least in my experience).
 

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I think kingsley has made the discision to care for it already, so the point of euth. is really a moot point. pics and updates would be nice.:)
 
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