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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I have had my white homing pigeons since last September, but have not flown them yet out of the loft.

I was told to wait until spring when the hawk migration gets better. Well, I am scared to fly them, and not sure when I should start. So none of them have flown yet, I have all young birds and 2013 birds that have not flown yet.

When is the best time to do this and what supplies should I have on hand in case one is attacked and injured.

I have heard super glue, but not sure how I would use it. Also heard neosprorin to pack into any wound. Anything else.

I just feel so paranoid about this, although we have an active wild bird feeder, and have never noticed anyone attacked. I don't see any hawks around.

Any advice. I really can't wait to fly them, I am looking forward to it, but scared too.

Thanks!
 

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In case any of my birds gets attacked,happened many-many times before.

First up,I use an air blower to access the number of injuries,cuts or scratches by blowing the feathers cuz the feather could be hiding some cuts. And if any cut/wound left unattened it could lead to infection. Many times before my birds have been caught and they managed to get out of the talons. Such birds have multiple cuts/injuries. After gentle checkup and accessing the number of injuries I use a sharp scissor to cut the feathers around the wound. Boiled saline water is used to clean the wound and an antibiotic cream is applied. (If wound's big then it may need stitches then its fixed with thread and a needle,you would wanna visit a vet for that). Then neosporin powder is sprinkled on it until it heals and bird is put on an antibiotic course.

I truly hope you never face a situation like this ever.
 

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Hello all,

I have had my white homing pigeons since last September, but have not flown them yet out of the loft.

I was told to wait until spring when the hawk migration gets better. Well, I am scared to fly them, and not sure when I should start. So none of them have flown yet, I have all young birds and 2013 birds that have not flown yet.

When is the best time to do this and what supplies should I have on hand in case one is attacked and injured.

I have heard super glue, but not sure how I would use it. Also heard neosprorin to pack into any wound. Anything else.

I just feel so paranoid about this, although we have an active wild bird feeder, and have never noticed anyone attacked. I don't see any hawks around.

Any advice. I really can't wait to fly them, I am looking forward to it, but scared too.

Thanks!
I have glued back a few crops and it works fine.. the addition of a cut wool sock helps. what I did was find a not too big or stretched out sock and cut the bottom off and use the elastic part as a tube top for the bird it helps to keep his crop supported while the glue does it's work.. the bird needs to be confined so a hospital cage or nest box where a bird can be held is needed and a source of heat like a heating pad, or you can use the rice micro wave things to add so they have a heat source to lean against. I never had to give an antibiotic as the crop heals pretty quick and quick dab of saline and then dry it with cotton and then glue it then the sock..next day add some cream neosporin as the salve is greasy.


now for a flesh or muscle wound or wing.. I would probably give antibiotic and clean it well then add the ointment and hope there are not internal injuries.
 

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Hello. I think there should be steps involved for first timers. Steps like having a breeding pair so there will be supply of new birds, settling the young, having dropper type birds to teach them the ropes, maybe tagging the young just in case they get lost, waiting for a clear day, time of day to liberate, liberating two birds at a time, first time flying them hungry from the day before, having a net to retrieve fallen/lost birds, making sure that the birds recognize you as a friend.
When i had just a pair of breeding birds, i never chased them around. I just waited and watched how their young explored the yard and slowly became airborne. Sometimes the male would fly with them and teach them to land because i did not have droppers. The young would mostly sit around until hawks would show up: not a good idea unless they are inclosed and can see the hawks from inside the cage. When the parent birds started chasing the young around, i would remove the hen and leave the male or just remove both parents from the breeding cage. If healthy, the young became stronger and stronger and would start fighting for territory. Then i would keep the males and females separate or everybody separated. That is the end i think.
 

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Only lucky ones escape,many do get taken away by hawks/falcons. Its better if a hawk takes the victim away rather leaving it behind with a horrible wound/broken wing or half killed
 

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keep some surgical thread and a needle, I find them handy in case of a hawk attack, also something to sterilize your surgical equipment with, alcohol solution is ideal. if the sterilization is not done properly that could lead to major infections in the cut wounds. a pair of scissor to cut of the feathers around the wound and keep an ointment to apply to the wound(iodine solution).
I never separate the wounded bird from the flock. from my experience wounded birds in a flock heal faster than isolated birds. just make sure that they get sufficient amount of food.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone! It sounds so gruesome! I hope I won't need any of this. I have already bought a million candlelight flash light, now I am going to order some blow horns on amazon. I am not sure what kind of net I would need, but I do have a big long net for our koi pond (which are really big goldfish).
Thanks so much!
 

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I am not sure where you are from but it changes according. Usually, when the leaves start coming on where you can't see straight thru the woods I start training young birds. It sounds like your birds will be strong on the wing, so hopefully you have been trap training, and caging them away from the loft so they know the surroundings. If they know the outside surroundings and how to get back in quick, your odds will be better.
 

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A pigeon attacked by a predator should be put on an antibiotic to fight infection. So have all these things ahead of time, as you won't be able to get them fast enough if you need them. Better to have them and not need them, than to need them and not have them.
 
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