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So it was Friday the 13th this March, we had a fantastic day at work and came home a little early on a beautiful warm and sunny day here in Denver.

We took the elevator up to our modest west facing 10th floor balcony to say hello to our two favorite birds. Our big white mystery heritage tumbler cock was sitting on the rabbit hutch and acting a little shy. We opened the door to the dark section of the hutch to say hello to our prized Ruby Roller Cock and our hearts suddenly dropped.

We free range from time to time, when we know we might have a long day and might not be home by dark, or when we are on vacation. When we got home early that day and our friend was missing. My wife closed the door and opened it again three times looking for him in disbelief. Our Ruby Roller was always home when his best friend was home, we decided to go back to the street to check the top corner of the building where they like to hang out during the day... nothing.

We have red tails and swainson that frequently visit our birds and the flock of commoners that live on top of the building next door. Any time a crow yells out a warning or the flock is heard clapping they are off like speeding bullets dropping down 4 stories to gain speed then back up till they are little dots in the sky to stay above the circling hawks. Often we watch the hawks tuck their wings and speed down through the flock next door. As you know, the risk is real.

We are devastated... our Prize Ruby Roller our favorite bird who would roll a deep 7 stories through eye level with near perfect form (occasionally finishing with a flat spin) was taken from us.

Even more devastated is our big tumbler. They had been paired for two years and did everything together (sleep, fight, feed, and fly). Now he is alone cooing LOUD most of the day (and sometimes at 2am), not eating, has moved to the rollers perch into the dark corner of the cage, is now afraid to eat out of our hands, and is always looking at the sky with fear. He will fly from time to time but his flight pattern is now fast and high, not playful.

:confused::eek::confused:

How long will his depression last?

Does he need a new buddy?

They would fight a lot over territory, if we get a new cock we expect problems. Will a new young cock pair up with him, or be rejected?

It's almost the same price to get 2 new Ruby cocks, there are 4 perches in the hutch. Will this fly?

I assume he will start eating again, he has already started a little but has lost a lot of weight.

If we do not get him a new friend will he regain his happiness?
-Will he go chasing some commoner girls and bring them back to our place? (we do not want to deal with squeakers on our small balcony)

 

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Ok your story is confusing? You are saying you KNOW for sure that this bird was taken by a hawk, do u have proof that he just didnt fly off with a hen and is nesting somewhere?

So u free fly them? and one was ON the coop but not in and the coop door was open or closed?

If that one bird is not eating and you say he is losing weight fast, dont assume that he will just start eating. FEED him by hand if u have to. Secure his health and safety first before tthinking about a new bird or two. Yes if you get another younger cockbird, then they may get along. If the bird was attacked right from the coop then they wont feel safe. Also how do u know the one male didnt get chased off by the hawk but not killed, unless you have the body of the other bird????
 

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Hello. Can you find tumbler or rollers that do not roll: just tail ride or half a flip here and there? That way these type of non tumbling rollers will have more control over their flexible bodies and survive just a little longer in a balcony setup.
Getting two young males may work with the tumbler. Its best if they all match in color, size and shape : as to confuse the hawks a little.
The lone male may find a partner and move in or out with her if let to nature.
I would add that my way is this: sleep, feed a pinch, fight and fly, feed and lockup: that way they do not fly with heavy food load, because the chasing raptors are flying on empty stomachs.
Two years is pretty good for a roller to survive his freedom. Mine lasted fall and the winter only. Lost one out of 5 fliers from the balcony and that was neglegence on my part. Soryy for your loss.
 

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Hawks are a risk for all pigeons but rollers are often more easily caught than other flyer types (e.g. homers) Catalonians and flyting-type oriental rollers are supposed to be more hawk resistant than some other breeds.....certainly the fancy breeds are easy prey. Pairs of cocks sometimes work (as it apparently did for you) but often end up fighting (even sometimes when paired). You may be better off getting a hen and just switching the real eggs with fakes if you don't want babies. If you free fly even having babies occasionally may be fun and if the space is crowded some may move in with the local flocks.
 
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