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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Taking in a new pigeon rescue may be a regular thing for many of us and, if so, keeping the bird isolated for a while may seem obvious, but here's a case in point.

Three days before Christmas, when my regular balcony ferals came for their food from a tray on the door mat, one was left behind. She was looking confused, and at first I thought she had lost an eye. I caught her without much trouble, as she wasn't sure which way to run, and found she had a section of scalp and feathers from the top/side of the head hanging over one eye, No bleeding, and no other kind of wound was evident. I already had one pigeon inside, so this one (now 'Feather') got a cage in another room. Heat pad to start, then later the rehydration mix and application of saline solution and Intrasite gel..

Feather travelled with me for the Christmas period, had some of the feathering trimmed back, and was on a course of Synulox (Clavamox) as no way of knowing how she got injured. She ate well, poops were quite acceptable, and she gained needed weight (only 275 grams when I took her in).

On the 10th day, when I took her out of the cage to see how she behaved, I could see that she was unable to fly and had very noticeable head tremors. She'd taken a good knock somehow, and we know that could cause damage to the nervous system ... but only after ten days? Of course, I did not know when she lost her flight, as I'd been keeping her warm and quiet so she wouldn't hurt herself further, only that she could fly ten days previously. The following day, I noted that she was turning in circles in an apparently uncontrolled way and, later, that although she was eating, she was seed tossing sporadically too. By day 13 she was having difficulty in focusing on individual food items, like peanuts, to pick them up. Although she isn't 'stargazing' much, she has had a little difficulty keeping her head up straight.

However I might otherwise question any one or two early signs separately, there's no doubt that she had got PMV. My guess is that she was already having a little problem with her flight and managed to not quite avoid collision with some surface like a rough wall.

She's doing well now, and very active when I let her out to explore. She tries very hard to fly and does a good 'helicopter' (with an occasional crash landing on the carpet), She is also a fierce little pigeon! A few days back she would run the other way if presented with 'the evil hand' - now she'll take the offensive and run up from a few feet away and attack it. She does seem to like standing or perching near me, watching while I work, though.

Anyway, this was a good reminder for me to never assume that because a pigeon has apparently 'only' an injury, not to get complacent and believe it is otherwise just fine and not take sensible precautions.

John
 

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Usually one month is a good idea.
 

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Sometimes there is no other way then to just accept the outwardly signs without even considering anything further-and then time brings out more symptoms, there is just no way you can know, but I'm so glad you shared that and reminded us all how important isolation is no matter what.

Thank you for your time spent sharing, and well worth it!

With PMV the isolation is six weeks (shedding the virus is 6 weeks) or more correct?
 

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This is the 4th pigeon that has developed PMV here during a 2 week isolation period in about 4 years, so it is not an extremely rare occurence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Trees: With PMV the isolation is six weeks (shedding the virus is 6 weeks) or more correct?
We would isolate a PMV case for at least 6 weeks from the time of noting definite symptoms (so Feather has had extra time added to her sentence ;) ). Gives time for the virus to run its course.

John
 

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We would isolate a PMV case for at least 6 weeks from the time of noting definite symptoms (so Feather has had extra time added to her sentence ;) ). Gives time for the virus to run its course.

John
Thanks John, just want to clarify fo everyone, in the case of PMV isolation would be six weeks at least, and not a month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
After 6 weeks, is a pigeon that had PMV 100% safe to place with non-affected pigeons?
Keith
To the best of any documented reference, that's when they stop shedding virus - and we have a lot of PMV pigeons who had quarantine (from first symptoms) of 6 weeks for some, and somewhat longer for others, depending on our accomodation at the time. We have never had any of them infect other pigeons in the aviary. That's in something like 8 years.

John
 

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Actually, although they shed the virus for 6 weeks none of ours have been isolated less than 8 weeks. This is because after they shed the virus it can persist on their feathers so we like to give them plenty of time for baths!
 

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6 weeks from the onset of the symptoms.
 

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Thanks for the reminder, John.

Don't have any rescues now, don't anticipate having any any time soon (not so many pigeons in our neighborhood). But, did watch seven pigeons eating, in downtown Antwerp. Wonder where the food came from. Lighter pockets going home.

When you don't practice certain routines on a regular basis (such as quarantine) because of lack of rescues to "practice" on, you can get forgetful. To the detriment of the pigeons.

Larry
 
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