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I happened to take this shot the other day when I got the little Great Horned Owl. I thought it might help anyone that finds themselves confronted with taking care of a baby Owl until they can get it to a vet or rehabber. It shows the minimum tools of the trade that you would need to give basic temporary care to a baby or a bird with minor injuries. The first and most important item in the picture are the welders gloves. Make sure you never try to catch or handle one of these guys without full length good quality welders gloves. Owls feed on vermin (rats/mice etc.) and often have some very nasty bacteria on their feet/talons. You get yourself punctured by those talons and you could catch some mighty bad things. Have neosporin on hand in case of an accident. Always handle the bird by grabbing him/her above the feet, never let your hands down below the feet where the talons could clamp onto your hand or arm. And always grab both feet. The next items the set of hemostats, get the long ones so you can feed the liver from a distance, Then there's the can of fresh chicken livers and the scissors. Use the scissors to cut the livers up into small $quarter size pieces. Never feed a bird hamburger/cat food/dog food etc. these are full of hormones and additives that can cause serious G,I, infections in wild birds. Then there is the can of animal calcium tablets, crush up one of these and sprinkle it over the liver. Normally the birds get their calcium from the bones and hair of their prey but liver has no bones and hair so you need to supplement the liver. Lastly the box - make sure it is strong enough to hold the fellow and if you can have it so you can put the food in without having to raise the lid, this is much safer for you and for the bird. The young don't need water they get their water from the liver. If they are small or injured you may also need to put a heating pad on low underneath one corner of the box, that way they can move away if it gets to hot. And lastly GET THEM TO A VET OR A REHABBER AS SOON AS YOU CAN. Any questions?

NAB :)

 

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THANKS, NAB FOR TAKING THE TIME TO POST THIS VERY HELPFUL and INFORMATIVE INFORMATION!!

I would hope that no one would need to use the information, but I know that I'm just whistling in the dark...especially for those who live in areas where Owls, etc. abound!!

Love and Hugs

Shi :)
 

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Nab, thanks for the info. Can you also feed them chicken gizzards?

One day, while watching the GHO babies on the live cam, I saw one of the babies actually swallow an entire rabbit's ear. It took several gulps to get it down but he did it. They "yawn" a lot too and I read that that helps them push the food down - I guess kinda like burping a baby. :)
 

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Thanks for the great info, Nab.

Reti
 
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