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Hi,

My friend found a very young pigeon (approx. 20 days) on the street. She didn't want to leave it to die so she took it home and has fed it with a bird paste and grains and water, obviously. S/he(?)'s doing well and has started flying around her bedroom perching on different things. He's about 40 days old now.

Our questions are:

1. As we don't yet know its gender would it be alright to put it in with an 1-year-old male (this other pigeon was rescued in a similar way)? Could there be a clash if he turns out to be a male also? He will live in an outdoor aviary with the other pigeon.

2. If this doesn't work out, is it possible to release him into the "wild" (the park next door)? Will he adapt and be accepted by other pigeons or will he just die (which is what we were originally trying to avoid)?

Please contact us with any information you might have on this subject.

Thanks,
Kelly and Émilie.
 

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Q1,If The pigeon Is An hen The Cock Bird Will desplay and if it is an hen he will try to chase it off but if it is a hen pair it up and you will have a new pigeon :)

Q2,if You have had the pigeon 20 days it should just sit on your roof or fly round your house there is a possiblity it will stay but if you dont want to keeep it give him/her to a fancier :)
 

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bump..........
 

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I have rescued pigeons of that age...babies between 10-20 days old.

The short answer is, in my experience, they CAN be released back into the feral life.

HOWEVER, you can't just open the door and let 'em go. You have to do a "Soft Release". Please do a search of that term on this Forum.

In short, this means you have to acclimate the baby to the things feral pigeons do...like forage and flee. This requires you to bring her/him (caged) to an area where there are ferals, and feed the ferals so she can see how they act. Then spook the ferals so she can see how they flee. After a short time she/he should start to peck at the food like the ferals forage, and she should spook and try to fly out of her cage when she sees the other ferals spook and fly off.

You have to do this several times...at least 5 times over the period of as many days, 15 minutes or so per time.

Now...if the baby is really bonded to humans (i.e. she comes to your shoulder, comes to you and begs for food, makes no attempt to evade or fly away when someone tries to catch them, seems to have no fear or caution) then it may well be unreleasable.

In my experience, usually a 20-day old has a lot of "wild" in them, so they make the transition fine. But each bird is an individual, so one cannot generalize about that.

 

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Hi Kelly and Émilie,
It is as Charis said ?????? or ……
Let's try to help you.
First - IF youngster is really 40 days old, I would keep him for some time. Why? This is the bird’s weaning period - 35 days from hatching and birds are very sensitive at this age. It is stressful period of their life when their parents stop feeding them and they start by their own. On approximately 45-th day from hatching starts their first moult. This is another stress for their bodies. New feather require more food and vitamins. For young pigeons these are difficult times and the get sick very easy.
Your pigeon wasn't doing well before you saved him and it needs time to get stronger.
On the other hand if you just dump him in the cage with your old pigeon, this will be as if you break in somebody's house and expect them to show hospitality.
Pigeons do not like strangers in their living space. As they look peaceful birds, they can be merciless to other pigeons and even kill them if in closed space with nowhere to run. One pigeon can only accept another pigeon as mate and then they can live together. To find mate one pigeon courts another pigeon, flirts, sings and it is quite a ritual taking days. Youngster is to young to understand such a things and he will be scared. What you can do is get another cage and put them close together, as neighbors. Give them time to get to know each other and see if they like being together. They will show you their feelings but give them time.
If you can't afford another cage or to keep young piggie anymore, well, you can try and release him and hope that luck will be on his side as it was once when it brought you to him in the time of need.
Leave seeds outside you window and open window that he can fly out alone. It may be that he will return, who knows, so keep on leaving seeds outside for couple of days and also leave window open to come in if he likes. (this is so called ‘Soft Release’)
 
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