Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
I prefer that they have two. :eek:

Sorry, couldn't resist. I am sure others will have an opinion one way or the other and be on soon to share.

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Yes, two wings are nice, LOL. And wings that are proportionate to the body. In that picture, 'long distance' wings appeal to me more, but only because I like long distance birds the most. But really it doesn't matter much to me. I just like being able to use the wing and body conformation to our advantage when I'm picking out birds for the longer races (because they'll all go to the short ones anyways).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
I prefer that they have two.
Sorry, couldn't resist. I am sure others will have an opinion one way or the other and be on soon to share.
Dan
:D Feathered ?! LOL
(nice drawing by the way)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
There was a All American flyer that was on the Pigeon Radio show last year...I called to ask if it was better to have a step in the wing of the distance pigeon...That means that the #1 primary flight is longer then the secondary flights....He said he had distance WINNERS with both kinds of wings...Both had shorter secondaries,and some that were even with the primeries....The one constant thing was,all the birds had narrower #7 to #10 flights,and they were allmost equal in lenght,and they had alot of space between them,when you opened the wing,and they were very flexable....Alamo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,852 Posts
Which would you prefer, a basketball player that is long, or one that is short, or one in the middle?

My point being that there are champions in any of those sizes. Same for pigeons I would assume. Looks and conformation do not count. The race results are what counts. If you start looking or breeding for a certain structure or conformation, then in my opinion, you are not looking for results.

Test the birds and whichever wings come home fastest, are the wings you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
Well I guess in that case I can start flying my ducks. They're Rouens and have big bodies and stubby wings. But conformation doesn't matter, right?

I think it does. Not the only thing that will make a winner but it certainly does help to have some speed advantages in sprint races and endurance advantages for the longer races.

Airplanes must have just the right shape of wing to become and stay airborne. Then that has to be fine tuned to allow it to be fast and fuel efficient. Friction and everything else that goes into aerodynamics is something you CAN'T ignore with anything that flies. However, our birds are not machines (which may come as a surprise to a lot of 'fanciers' :rolleyes: ), so a lot of other things come into play besides conformation and the motor(s) that run it. Luck is probably over half of what means winning and losing. On top of all of that, they have to be trained (doesn't necessarily mean road training) and conditioned right, and have to be physically and mentally fit. Just because they're called homing pigeons, doesn't mean that at any point they can't decide 'I'm not coming home' and leave/not return. If someone or somewhere appeals to them more, they'll follow that someone or go to that someplace. After all, we didn't invent the term 'fly away' for nothing.
On the long races, the majority of the birds may be out over night. Doesn't mean they're bad birds, just means they have too far to fly in one day considering the conditions of the race. Then you're lucky if your birds (whether champion or dropper material) don't end up compressed into a pellet, laying underneath the tree where an owl roosts. And the weather is never guaranteed to be as we say it will be. A lot of things can happen within the hundred miles between my loft and Renee's club members, and the hundred miles between GCC's members and my loft. If the birds happen to hit a patch of low lying clouds, then they become in danger of powerlines, trees, and everything else that gets in the way, as well as Peregrines, who are made to hunt in tough weather.


So considering all that could go wrong and all that could go right, no, conformation may not be the most important thing. Results of course, are always what come first in picking out future breeders, and what we've come to base 'good' or 'bad' upon. But, like all other things, I think it is something you should keep in mind. Not necessarily for picking out breeders (I wouldn't pick a 'pretty' bird over a bird with results, anyway), but for picking out who goes to the long races, as opposed to saving them for sprints, the second year, or perhaps stocking.

With all or the majority of your birds in prime shape, and with only so many spots you can fill in the shipping baskets, some kind of elimination process has to go on. And hopefully that process isn't sending birds who aren't best for the race, but rather birds who are more so than the others.



There's my two cents :|
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,852 Posts
Well. I'm not the most experienced and winning flyer around. But I do think that if you are filling your basket with birds that LOOK the part, you have less of a chance, than if you are filling your basket with parts that perform.

If the basket accepts only a limited amount of birds, then send the ones who did best in training or on previous races. Maybe even those that came from certain lines or parents. But picking them by the length or shape of their wings, is trying to just get lucky or make a point. One does not need to be a recognized champion to know this. It is common sense, I believe.

There are show breeds that have better looking wings on them, than homers do (length wise, longer or shorter). Maybe we should breed some rollers with our homers to get that wing we may desire? A duck may indeed beat a homer racing over water, so everything has its specialty and use in life.

Next would be picking them by color, eyesign or "apple shaped body". All hogwash, in my humble opinion. For sure, you can pick out a healthy bird, or even one that has a stong back or whatever. Maybe even feather condition, But wing length? Good luck with that.

P.S. You would not believe how many different shapes and kinds of wings there are on airplanes. One size does not fit all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,455 Posts
I know there are a lot of different wings on planes. My dad and uncle are both licensed pilots. There is a large variety of different shaped pigeon wings as well, which is why I was hoping no one would see my picture. It doesn't, and can't, account for them all, or I'd be drawing all day. But I still believe certain groups of similar wings can help or hurt a bird in certain races. But that's just my opinion I suppose, which everyone is entitled to.

Since I, too, am nowhere near as experienced or skilled in racing as others here, I'll stop there and let the more expert-like fanciers talk.


Edit: I just noticed the first post is a little misconceiving. We aren't talking about the length of the wing. "Short, middle, long" is describing the distance they'll be flying. I couldn't care less how long a pigeon's wing was, just whether or not it is proportionate to the body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
What kind of wings do you prefer? Long, Middle, or Small Wings...

http://www.pigeons.biz/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=13539&stc=1&d=1250562845
I have been to South Africa Million Dollar Race several times in the last 5 years. The morning following the race, the top 100 birds (out of 5,000 original entries) are brought into the Superbowl for auction. I have bought and being a bidder, you are allowing to examine the birds. I have handled the top 100 birds in each of those times...EVERY single bird, so that's 400 pigeons/champions that I have handled from big competition.


I have seen all types of wing shapes that have been identified by the theorists - and the final race is probably for a longer-distance bird. But I have seen "short distance wings", steps, no-steps, short arm, long arm, last 3 equal length, last 3 not equal length, narrow outer flights, not so narrow outer flights - ALL IN THE TOP 10 birds. Since these visits, I have thrown out all the wing theories except one - a bird that gives its wing easily (not too easy, but not jerky, and little to no vibration).

And my results have sky-rocketed as I now only allow the race basket
to dictate what I buy/breed/fly.
 
G

·
I have been to South Africa Million Dollar Race several times in the last 5 years. The morning following the race, the top 100 birds (out of 5,000 original entries) are brought into the Superbowl for auction. I have bought and being a bidder, you are allowing to examine the birds. I have handled the top 100 birds in each of those times...EVERY single bird, so that's 400 pigeons/champions that I have handled from big competition.


I have seen all types of wing shapes that have been identified by the theorists - and the final race is probably for a longer-distance bird. But I have seen "short distance wings", steps, no-steps, short arm, long arm, last 3 equal length, last 3 not equal length, narrow outer flights, not so narrow outer flights - ALL IN THE TOP 10 birds. Since these visits, I have thrown out all the wing theories except one - a bird that gives its wing easily (not too easy, but not jerky, and little to no vibration).

And my results have sky-rocketed as I now only allow the race basket
to dictate what I buy/breed/fly.
well said ;)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top