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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have nine rollers in my loft. three are young bird and the rest are older birds. i'm not sure if any of them have been flown yet beacause i got them from a lady who didn't know if they had been. my question is, can i train them all to return back to my loft or just the young birds?

Thanks,
Calder
 

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Some people may say you'll need to let the olders 1's have some young (I did) , but you definately can train them all too return to your loft just make sure you trap train and turn them out hungary
 

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If the young birds are 2 months or younger, I'd keep them in for 2 weeks. Old birds for a month. Rollers have virtually no homing ability so there's no worry about resettling them. However, older birds who have been flown before, may come bounding out of the loft wanting to fly too much, and could get lost. That's why I always kept them in for a month so they know their surroundings and how to work the trap before coming out.
 

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flying

I have been told when you are going to fly older birds that have been flown from another loft you should keep them in an open avery so they can see there surrounding are differant before flying. Like I said this is only what I have been told but it makes sense, they may look for there old loft surrounding if they bolt out like Mary said. >Kevin
 

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Czarkos
Make sure you fly them hungry. Cut em to half a ration the day before. The point of the first 5-6 times you let em out is to get them going in the box on command and learning the neighborhood. If they go out and come right back in five - ten minutes give them 1/2 a tablespoon of millet. Let em rest 30-40 minutes and shoo em out again. This time close the door and make em stay out for 30-40 minutes after they land. They should go up and fly around for a few minutes at a time.Put em up for the day or put em in a cage on top of the box. Repeat the next day.

Dont overfeed em. It wont hurt them to cut the feed back for a few days while you`re training them. Fly em for three or four days then feed em up on a days rest and go three or four days again. Once they get rolling and steady in their flight , fly them every other day after the young birds have gone thru the first molt.
As they learn the neighborhood they will fly longer and wider. It takes a few weeks for them to get back into and develop flying shape.

Are you shaking the feed can when you feed them? Birds are easily trained in Pavolvian response to come down on command when you whistle and shake the feed can. You can also use a dropper to help them come in faster. Feed is YOUR control over the behavior of your birds. Quality, amount and types of seed will affect the performance of your kit.

have fun
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Czarkos
Make sure you fly them hungry. Cut em to half a ration the day before. The point of the first 5-6 times you let em out is to get them going in the box on command and learning the neighborhood. If they go out and come right back in five - ten minutes give them 1/2 a tablespoon of millet. Let em rest 30-40 minutes and shoo em out again. This time close the door and make em stay out for 30-40 minutes after they land. They should go up and fly around for a few minutes at a time.Put em up for the day or put em in a cage on top of the box. Repeat the next day.

Dont overfeed em. It wont hurt them to cut the feed back for a few days while you`re training them. Fly em for three or four days then feed em up on a days rest and go three or four days again. Once they get rolling and steady in their flight , fly them every other day after the young birds have gone thru the first molt.
As they learn the neighborhood they will fly longer and wider. It takes a few weeks for them to get back into and develop flying shape.

Are you shaking the feed can when you feed them? Birds are easily trained in Pavolvian response to come down on command when you whistle and shake the feed can. You can also use a dropper to help them come in faster. Feed is YOUR control over the behavior of your birds. Quality, amount and types of seed will affect the performance of your kit.

have fun
Thank you for the advice, this is what i have been looking for! i have been shaking the feed, but i haven't been whistling which i should start doing.

thank you so much,
Calder
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
K thanks.

also i have three young birds that i am planning to fly but can i also let an older bird out with them, or should i wait for the younger birds to build some muscle before letting the older bird fly with them? As far as i know the older bird hasn't flown in a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
today i let out two of my birds and they came back to the loft, the only problem i had was that they stayed out for five hours before coming back in, what should i do to make sure that they come back earlier?

thanks,
Calder
 

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czarkos, It sounds like you may be feeding too much. Cut the food back. Try cutting the food in half, or less than you normally feed the day before you want to fly the birds. Make sure they know your whistle and the shaking of the food can. If they're hungry they'll trap shortly after the sounds you have trained them with. Believe me, it's hard at first to give them less food, but you will see the results immediately. From then on keep an eye on them. If they fly too long again, cut the food back a little more. Once you have the right ratio they'll be trapping soon after you give them the sounds. Never stop with the sounds of the whistle and can shaking. The YB's will learn the sounds too and train quicker for you. Give it a shot. Randy :)
 

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czarkos, I forgot to mention, you should feel good for having birds out for five hours and no hawk attacks or ambushes! I recently was roof training some yb's and it lasted about two minutes before the ambush occurred. Two coopers attacked and scattered the birds, then came the peregrine. I only lost one bird, and thank god it wasn't to a bop, it got lost. Then just after sun down it circled the loft, I whistled and it made a dive towards me and the loft. The cooper hawk again swooped at it but missed. It was by then too dark for my bird to return. I've never seen it again. My kids were devistated. My birds have been in lockdown ever since. Tomorrow promises to be a great day, and I plan to fly. The birds ate a light meal tonight. They'll trap immediately if any sign of a BOP by the trained whistle and can shaking, plus the light meal. Randy
 

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p

to help keep the hawks away try using an air horn or even two. I wont fly my birds without having one in my hands at all times when my birds are out! It must be explained to the young or new breeders of pigeons that hawks love to eat tame pigeons and can detect which ones are tame or wild! the hawks will pass up sparrows, robins, starlings, cardinals, mice, rabbits, etc. to get to YOUR birds and will even wait perched in a tree till you let them out and wont stop until ALL of your birds are GONE! you can even use a long pole (bamboo if possible) with a garbage bag tied to the end of it to make the loud noise (that hawks hate) when waving it back and forth. also, some of the terms we older fanciers use should be explained to the beginers as well as not to confuse them, some of them still confuse me lol.. by the way, what does "BOP" stand for anyway????
 
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