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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI everyone,

I live in Edmonton, Alberta and we are experiencing a deep freeze. Frostbite (for humans) in under five minutes. With windchill it is supposed to be -48 CELSIUS.

My flock consists of ferals, all of which have gone through our winters before, some many. It was -40 last night and everyone seemed fine. I have been checking their weights daily and everyone is staying fat. They are getting extra corn and have a heated waterer.

My loft isn't aa loft, persay. It is made up of six sections, each about 2'x2' x 2' . The sides, top and bottoms are wood, the fronts are coroplast with a small door to each section. The entire front of each section swings up to open and velcros shut. The top and top half of the front are insulated with foil, on the outside. The inside of each section is insulated with foil on the top and back. The bottom of each section is lined with straw which I have piled along the sides as well. Then. There is a nest box in each section, on top of the straw, and then lined with straw itself. So the entire structure is four feet tall, six feet long and two feet wide. It is raised off the ground on cement blocks and straw is packed underneath and there is a layer on top.

I am worried about bringing them in because I want to be able to put them back out again and worry it will be a shock on their systems. We have wild pigeons here, obviously, and they seem to survive under the bridges and billboards, and I have never lost one during the winter...should I bring them in? Most are paired but there are a couple of loners. They would have to be in small carriers if they came inside.

The entire structure is inside a largee aviary. I have covered the sides in plywood to reduce wind. The top is covered by a slanted wooden roof. The ground is covered in straw. I eas considering buying an outdoor floodlight. They could roost under during the day (protected by wire) but that wouldn't heat their shelter.

Thoughts?
 

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Well I haven't dealt with those extreme temperature numbers myself but honestly, if theres still city pigeons outside and they survive, your pigeons have a MUCH bigger chance of survival with the added protection of plywood, straws, etc etc. As long as their loft (or sections in your case) isn't drafty, they should be fine. Just make sure there's ventilation, but that there isn't a draft getting in if you get what I'm trying to say.

Now I live in the lower mainland BC, and the temperatures aren't as extreme but we do have -17 with the windchill today and the birds are fine. Just keep on adding corn and try to change the water twice a day cause it freezes :)
 

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What would happen if you put a red heat lamp (like the ones you use when you have baby chicks or something) in a corner of the loft where the birds can crowd if they need to? (somewhere with plenty of perching spots near and far from the heat source.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is no "common area" of the loft, it is basically six separate sections with six separate doors. It would neexd six heat lamps and since each section is only 2 feet by 2 feet, a heat lamp wouldn't work.
 

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HI everyone,

I live in Edmonton, Alberta and we are experiencing a deep freeze. Frostbite (for humans) in under five minutes. With windchill it is supposed to be -48 CELSIUS.

My flock consists of ferals, all of which have gone through our winters before, some many. It was -40 last night and everyone seemed fine. I have been checking their weights daily and everyone is staying fat. They are getting extra corn and have a heated waterer.

My loft isn't aa loft, persay. It is made up of six sections, each about 2'x2' x 2' . The sides, top and bottoms are wood, the fronts are coroplast with a small door to each section. The entire front of each section swings up to open and velcros shut. The top and top half of the front are insulated with foil, on the outside. The inside of each section is insulated with foil on the top and back. The bottom of each section is lined with straw which I have piled along the sides as well. Then. There is a nest box in each section, on top of the straw, and then lined with straw itself. So the entire structure is four feet tall, six feet long and two feet wide. It is raised off the ground on cement blocks and straw is packed underneath and there is a layer on top.

I am worried about bringing them in because I want to be able to put them back out again and worry it will be a shock on their systems. We have wild pigeons here, obviously, and they seem to survive under the bridges and billboards, and I have never lost one during the winter...should I bring them in? Most are paired but there are a couple of loners. They would have to be in small carriers if they came inside.

The entire structure is inside a largee aviary. I have covered the sides in plywood to reduce wind. The top is covered by a slanted wooden roof. The ground is covered in straw. I eas considering buying an outdoor floodlight. They could roost under during the day (protected by wire) but that wouldn't heat their shelter.

Thoughts?
Any time you move birds from one temp to another they need to be acclimated ..so you are right it would be a shock.. either way from cold to warm or warm to cold they have to be slowley adjusted to it. I think if they stay in and have all the feed they want and fresh water they should be fine if they do not have any drafts.
 

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I agree. As long as you cover the structure to keep the wind/draft out, they should be fine. As Gurbir said, they have a much better chance than the ferals with shelter, good food and fresh water.
If your really worried (-45 is :eek: ), I wouldn't use heat lamps, they are not safe. You could pick up enough of these reptile heating elements for each section. They come in different sizes. I have 2 sizes in case of emergency- 4" diameter and 8" diameter. No light, they screw into a ceramic 'hood' with a clip to attach above and just radiate heat. Here is a link for them.....
http://www.thatpetplace.com/pet/group/2533/product.web


I used one during the winter when I had babies, kept them nice and warm.
 
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