Pigeon-Talk banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the second brood by the same robin in this nest. We were lucky enough to watch in person the chicks leave the nest early morning yesterday. Here's a video of the first one leaving (at around 2:40 on the video). The look on the faces of his/her siblings is funny. It's as if they thinking..."You can fly?":)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NptVR1XLHnQ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow! Darling youngsters! What a precious moment you captured, thank you for sharing it with us.
You're very welcome.

Yesterday was bittersweet. We got to see the chicks fly out of the nest, but will miss them all so much. For weeks (again, this is the second brood) we have watched nest building, eggs being laid & hatched, mom and dad bird feeding and standing guard. The nest is right outside our rear patio door, so we would greet the mom everyday. She typically stayed in the nest as we walked right under her. We would check on them in the evenings/days via an app on our phones. The experience has been really cool.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,396 Posts
I'm sure you will miss them because you cared for them, and experienced all those special moments.

I'm glad you appreciated these moments enough to share, but I'm sorry you are going thru "empty nest" syndrome. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
That is really nice to have experienced them so close by. Thanks for sharing. Adorable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
I have very young robins running around in our backyard, not long out of the nest. I do put stuff down for them, but didn't know they liked grated cheese. Thanks for the idea!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nice video, surely they must still be around with mom and dad teaching them how to find insects. Put down a small bowl of grated cheese, they just love that!
We see and hear them all day long. Yesterday, I saw the mom/dad hopping along our back fence line with 2 following closely. In the trees in and around our yard, we can hear them calling to their parents for food. Of course, we can hear their excitement when the parents bring them food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,914 Posts
I've read about the grated cheese on the internet. My friend's cat caught a Cape Robin, and I did not know what to feed the poor bird. The grated cheese kept him alive until I was able to get hold of mealworms. He also likes earthworms and woodlice (pillbugs). Poor birdie still can't fly after a month now, just hops all over the place and eats A LOT! I guess their metabolism must be very high cause they are always on the go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
Well the cheese is a good thing to know. I hope he will know how to survive when you release him. I always worry about that with songbirds, as you don't want to keep them prisoners forever, but don't know how well they will do without parents to show them.
We raised a nest of starlings once, then took them outside when young to practice looking for bugs and such. Finally let them go in the yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well the cheese is a good thing to know. I hope he will know how to survive when you release him. I always worry about that with songbirds, as you don't want to keep them prisoners forever, but don't know how well they will do without parents to show them.
We raised a nest of starlings once, then took them outside when young to practice looking for bugs and such. Finally let them go in the yard.
My son found a baby robin (not from the pair of birds at our patio). It was hopping around in our yard, was not able to fly. We waited for the parents to feed him, but it never happened through the day. We decided to protect him from potential night predators, then put him back in the yard in the morning. He stayed in our yard, still no one feeding him. So, we started digging up worms and he took them from us. After a while, he would hop over to where we were digging and got the worms himself. Eventually, he started getting the worms right out of the middle of the lawn just like the other robins. After about a week, he started leaving our yard in the early evenings. We have no clue where he would go, but he would come back every day first thing in the morning and stick around our yard most of the day. I had coffee and cookies with him on a few occasions. I would go outside early AM for coffee and a couple of cookies, and out of no where, he would land on the table and want a piece of my cookie. Over a 2 week period, we would see him intermittently through the day (still, always in the mornings and in the evenings). As the 2 weeks progressed, we would see him less and less through the day, but he always came by just before dark as if to say goodnight. Then one day, we didn't see him morning or evening. We figured he must have found his bird family, and preferred them over his human family. We named him Buddy. That was a magical spam of 3+ weeks. To have a wild robin come visit was amazing. He would often land on our shoulder, or a knee as we sat on our back deck. In all my life, I will remember that bird. We've had a couple (or the same robin) get very close to us as we're in the back yard. Perhaps it's Buddy a little more grown up? I'll post a picture of Buddy later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Here's a picture of Buddy early on...
https://buddythebird.shutterfly.com/pictures/9

I have lots more pictures and videos of Buddy. I'll share more when I have time to upload. Perhaps Buddy is a female? We're not sure, but for whatever reason, my son decided Buddy was a he, not a she. If someone here can tell by this picture if Buddy is a female...well, we'll have to call her Budette, or something similar. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,797 Posts
Hard to tell at that stage. When they mature, the male is the one with the darker, brighter colors. The females colors are softer.
Yes, it is nice when you can make friends with a wild bird. I had a male carolina wren that would come to me and eat mealworms from my hand. He came for a few years. It was fun watching them raise babies, and come to the feeder right outside the window for worms. He would hop right inside the window, which was left open a few inches, and hop around when I was in that room, to tell me that his mealworm feeder needed refilling. I really enjoyed that bird.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top