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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to pigeons but I would like to start up a loft form my son and I. We live in Tucson Arizona and are looking for some Homers. Anyone out there know of some breeders in our area?

Thanks in advance,

Scott
 

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Here are some racing clubs in AZ. I didn't check to see which ones are close to you. I just listed what I found. Good luck.


Club Name :
Club Code : SAZF
Club Secretary : THOMAS STAPLETON
City : BENSON
State : AZ
Phone No. : 520-586-8920

DEA Dennis Aycock
Dennis Aycock ...............................(602)938-4962
5411 W. Monte Cristo Glendale, AZ 85306
[email protected]

FCON French Connection Loft
Bob French ....................................(602)938-3490
5014 W. Paradise Ln., Glendale, AZ 85306

JBS John Sahhar
John Sahhar ................................. (602)743-3191
5239 W. Lamar Rd., Glendale, AZ 85301


PARADISE Paradise
Rod Hutchings...............................(602)697-7333
5707 E. Duane Ln., Cave Creek, AZ 85331
[email protected]

PHNX Phoenix R.P.C.
Gary Miller ....................................(602)995-0721
2624 W. Lane Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85051
[email protected]

PSC Phoenix Sportsman Club
Bob French ....................................(602)938-3490
5014 W. Paradise Ln., Glendale, AZ 85306
 

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If I am not mistaken the winner of the Sun City challenge million dollar race lives in Tucon or near by. Either Jedds or Siegels sold him one of the breeders of the birds. Their web page can help find the guy. I will try and find it.

Randy
 

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Benson would be closer to Tucson.

The other places are in the Phoenix area. Phoenix is about 111 miles from Tucson.

Shi
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow, thanks for all of the quick responses. I will try to give the folks in Benson a call to see what they have available. Any ideas as to how many birds I would need to start out. How much I should pay? Does it matter if they are registered? Maybe I should start a new thread asking these questions.

Thanks again for all the help so far.

Scott
 

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Wow, thanks for all of the quick responses. I will try to give the folks in Benson a call to see what they have available. Any ideas as to how many birds I would need to start out. How much I should pay? Does it matter if they are registered? Maybe I should start a new thread asking these questions.

Thanks again for all the help so far.

Scott
No need to start a new thread, Scott.

If you are interested in eventually racing Homers, that's a class in itself. We have very knowledgeable members who can advise. Having a mentor can be very important. Finding clubs in the Tucson area is another way of linking with "pigeon people."

You do need to do your homework on building a proper loft. Again, we have lots of information on that too.

Proper nutrition is a must and finding a good Avian Vet can be critical in times of an emergency.

Starting with a few is always best.

If you haven't done so already, please check out our Resources section.

Questions are always welcomed and others will be along to add their comments.

Best of everything and we will look forward to your updates!

Shi and Mr. Squeaks

:D :D :D :D
 

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How much I should pay? Does it matter if they are registered? Maybe I should start a new thread asking these questions.
Thanks again for all the help so far.

Scott
If I were you I would address all your concerns and questions in the homing and racing pigeons forum, you will get a wider response there.

Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow that is some win. Africa and $200,000 dollars I had no idea there was that kind of money in racing pigeons. Or even that kind of competition. I will have to show that article to my 7 year old son.

Would someone with such nice birds be willing to sell some to someone like me? I would think they sell their birds to really serious people only. I will see if I can find some contact information for him.

Thanks again for all the great responses.

Scott
 

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Yes they would. Some of the faniciers in this sport are in it to promote the sport. Not all in pigeons are in it for a buck. My mentor brought be two birds at the end of last years breeding season and gave them to me. One was a cock off of two Ganus birds and a grandson of Ikon and Magic Star. These birds were 10K or more when bought by Ganus. He also brought me a granddaughter off of a 54K winner in the San Diego Classic. The sire of the bird was a futurity winner he paid $1500 for. Not all Desert lofts birds won him 200K and not all his bird he will want to keep. Most fanciers will be willing to help you out. No matter how much they win. I am about nine hours from you, but would be glad to get you started with some birds. If you are going to race save yourself a lot of troubble and get the best birds you can find or afford. My birds have been tested quite a bit flying in southern New Mexico to El Paso and Demming. Birds that have proven good in the hot desert climates are birds you should posses.
Pigeonparadise.com is a great page for you to get educated on the racing sport.

Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hillfamilyloft,

Thank you very much for the offer of helping me get started. That is really nice and I sincerely appreciate that. If I get up your way I will shoot you a pm so that maybe we could stop by and see some of your birds.

I have googled the desert view lofts but keep coming up with dead ends for a phone number. I will spend some time this weekend to see if I can locate them some other ways. They have a website but it is down for some reason, or it could be my office is blocking it??

I am not sure if I would like to get into racing or not at this point? Its not something that I had even considered to be honest. But the competitive nature I have, will probably send us that way.

My son and I have built a loft with nesting boxes similar to some pictures we have seen on line. I think it has 6 nesting boxes, a trap, etc. Now its time to get a few birds!

I will take a look at the resources page to make sure that we are ready for them.

Thanks again for all the help.

Scott
 

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Pegionsfor sale

Try Cowboy Lorfice in Merana 18 miles south of Tucson Az. I know he has great birds as his heart.:) Jp
I am new to pigeons but I would like to start up a loft form my son and I. We live in Tucson Arizona and are looking for some Homers. Anyone out there know of some breeders in our area?

Thanks in advance,

Scott
 

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Circovirus

The Pigeon Cote The Emerging Problem Of Pigeon Circovirus
A new disease concern for pigeon fanciers is being recognized with increasing frequency. With reports of infected flocks in northern and southern California, Canada, and Australia, it now appears that Pigeon Circovirus may become a major problem among mixed-aged flocks. This is an example of a disease that has been around for at least a decade, but that went unrecognized until recently. 1.
Circoviruses are a newly described group that includes Pigeon Circovirus, Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD) and Chicken Anemia Agent (CAA). Detailed laboratory studies confirm that these viruses are similar to one another (they share some portions of their DNA), but there is no known cross-over of disease agents from one group of birds to another. PBFD is certainly the best known of the three, affecting more than 35 species of "hookbills" (parrots, macaws, cockatoos, and their allies). This disease results in characteristic abnormalities in feather growth, beak lesions and long-term loss of body condition. It is known that both PBFD and CAA cause disruption of the tissues comprising the lymphoid system. This system (including the spleen, thymus, Bursa of Fabricius, and both gut- and bronchial-associate d lymphoid tissues) houses cells that are responsible for most immune functions of the body: making antibodies, recognizing disease organisms, processing antigens, and so forth. Because CAA and PBFD viruses harm the lymphoid organs, birds having these diseases are "immunosuppressed" . That is, these viruses cause a form of acquired immunodeficiency (like human AIDS). One result is that secondary infections with other viruses, bacteria and fungi are common among birds with PBFD and CAA, even when birds are vaccinated against the secondary problems. In other words, Circoviruses compromise the birds' ability to benefit from vaccination!
Disease symptoms seen in birds with Pigeon Circovirus somewhat resemble those seen with PBFD and CAA. Pigeons initially show respiratory symptoms, weight loss, diarrhea, and stop eating, often dying after a short (2 to 5 day) period of illness. Many symptoms seen in Circovirus - infected birds are really attributable to disease caused by secondary infections that take hold because Circovirus has suppressed the bird's immune responses. Among these secondary infections, researchers have found Chlamydia (Ornithosis/ Psittacosis) , Herpes virus, Pasteurella (Cholera), Paramyxovirus - 1, Trichomonas (Canker), and Aspergillus (among others). Interestingly, in some Circovirus - infected flocks, there will be illness, but no mortality, while in other flocks, 100% of the squabs will die.
When these pigeons are presented for post-mortem exam, the most common findings are destruction of cells in the spleen, thymus and Bursa. The latter two organs normally shrink in size after hatching and are tiny or absent in the adult bird. In the youngster, however, they are very important as sites for immune system tissues. With these primary target organs, it is not surprising that all pigeons with confirmed Circovirus infections thus far have been one year or less in age. Infections have occurred both in racing lofts (in one case a bird returned two days late from a race and other individuals were performing poorly.), and in squab operations; a variety of breeds are represented. The relatively high frequency of infections among racing pigeons suggests that inadequate attention has been paid to shipping conditions and quarantine. Dr. Leslie Woods, of U.C. Davis feels that if Pigeon Circovirus holds true to the pattern set by PBFD and CAA, then infection may be by a fecal-oral route. As yet, there are no known wild bird reservoirs for the virus, so it is uncertain how racers are encountering the disease.
Several factors conspire at present to hinder the prevention and diagnosis of Circovirus in Pigeons. So far, researchers have not been able get the virus to replicate in the lab. This step is required before rapid diagnostic tests can be developed or vaccine trials can be done. Additionally, the presence of so many secondary infections in Circovirus - positive flocks can lead to errors in treatment and diagnosis. Unfortunately, the other Circoviruses are very resistant to treatment with heat, disinfectants and detergents. 2. If this also holds for Pigeon Circovirus, it may be that the only way to salvage an infected flock is to eliminate all young birds for at least a year (ie, let the virus die - out naturally). Even this measure may fail, however, if the virus is able to exist in a "carrier state" in some adult birds. These and other details of the epidemiology (natural history and patterns of infection) of Pigeon Circovirus are completely unknown.
Our advice is to pay careful attention to hygiene and quarantine procedures when shipping birds, especially racers. Fanciers who import squabs, particularly into flocks that already have many young birds, should observe strict quarantines for 2 to 4 weeks after arrival. Until flocks can routinely be vaccinated, this newly recognized, immunosuppressive virus represents a real threat to 'open - entry' flocks and racing lofts.
Dave J. Rupiper DVM
Kenneth T. Briggs DVM, Ph.D.
References

1. Woods LW. Circovirus Infections in Pigeons. Proc Annu Conf Assoc Avian Vet, 1993; 156-157.
2. Gerlach H. Viruses. In Ritchie B, Harrison GJ, Harrison LR, (eds.). Avian Medicine: Principles and Application. Lake Worth, FL, Wingers Publishing, 1994; 862-948.
 

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Vinegar

Has any one tried it?

Vinegar
Why should a fancier use vinegar for his pigeons?

* Apple cider vinegar or just plain vinegar will acidify the contents in the crop and discourage the multiplication of trichomonas organisms. It will, however, not cure pigeons of trichomoniasis. Also, bacteria which do not like an acidic environment such as Salmonella, for example, are discouraged from multiplying in the crop. Acid loving bacteria like the lactobacilli, on the other hand, will find this a hospitable environment and can continue on their way to the colon where they will find favourable conditions for growth and multiplication. I am certain that any acid such as vinegar cannot survive its journey into the colon. It can probably pass the stomach but the very basic pancreatic juice emptying into the small intestine will most certainly neutralize it to allow the absorption of the resultant water and acetate.
Although none of the vinegar ingested arrives in the large intestine how can it possibly then result in the acidification of the colonic contents? The answer lies in its favouring lactobacilli to survive the journey to the colon at the expense of bacteria like Escherichia coli and Salmonella who like a more neutral or basic ph. These lactobacilli will consequently colonize the colon and their metabolic products such as lactic acid are responsible for this observed increase in acidity.
* acidify the contents of the gizzard, leading to better digestion.
* lower the blood pressure and cholesterol level.
* ameliorate muscle cramps and
* decrease the concentration of
o Escherichia coli
o Salmonella and
o yeasts in the colon.
* disinfect the drinking water.

It is advantageous to be somewhat sceptical in our world where so many salesmen and would-be salesmen try to take advantage of gullible people and separate them from their money. Any sceptic should make the following experiment: Give some of your pigeons apple cider vinegar for 3 weeks and treat the others as usual. You may find that the group receiving the vinegar has now softer feathers and more oil spots on their feathers than the other group. You are aware, I am sure, that soft plumage and oil spots are a sign of good condition which was contributed to by the use of apple cider vinegar. You will also find them to take their exercise with more enthusiasm attesting to their better condition.
The following schedule was recommended:
In the flying season: on the 2nd and 3rd day after a race
In the off season: every day for 3-4 weeks
During moulting: 3-4 days per week
If diarrhoea: for 5-7 days
Recommended Dosage: from 5ml to 15ml vinegar per 1000ml H2O but this depends on the ph of the water. The more basic the water, the more vinegar will be required.
A dosage of 15 ml vinegar per 1000ml H2O can be used for giving them a bath, no other salts and powders being necessary, and this is said to effectively eliminate ectoparasites.
It wasn't too many years ago that the droppings in some nests in my loft were excessively wet. I blamed the parents of those youngsters for feeding them too much water. Checking the crops of those youngsters revealed way too much water or not enough grain. I shouldn't have gotten angry at their parents. It would have been better to look into a mirror to find the one who was guilty of this state of affairs. The old ones were looking for salt and minerals. Since the source of these nutrients did not appeal to the old ones they drank excessively. They tried to supply their youngsters with these nutrients, a tiny amount of which could be found in the water.
Adding enough vinegar to the water will result in less water feeding also as will many other substances which make the water almost non-potable. Birds won't drink too much of this stuff but it would be much better to correct the deficiency than just treating the symptoms. Vinegar is just acetic acid which will be neutralized easily by the feed in the crop since it has no buffering capacity. Adding it to the drinking water results in the birds drinking less as they do not like this acidic taste. Less water will consequently be available for the body's response to a deficiency of salt or minerals or to intestinal irritation which would normally result in diarrhea. There will therefore be less diarrhea visible and the fancier may fool himself into thinking that all is well.
I found "AcidPak" to be a better water additive for discouraging the spread of Salmonella, E. coli, Trichomonas and yeast organisms. Not only do the birds like the water acidified by "AcidPak" much better than water acidified by vinegar, "AcidPak" contains enzymes and has a built-in buffering capacity insuring that the water remains acidic while in the crop.
Please use some ph test strips to make sure that the ph is below 4 as the amount needed depends on the hardness of the water you are using. The value of ph = 3 below was obtained with 1 tsp / 4 liters of my water. Less "AcidPak" is needed for softer water, more for harder water.

* Benefits: increased moulting of down feathers
* red feet
* pink breast muscles
* less scales
* good droppings
* no canker, but this claim is exaggerated. Water at ph 4 will discourage trichomonas organisms and will cause these to change shape in their effort to cope with an inhospitable environment, but this acidity will not kill most trichomonas organisms.

This page was last up-dated on July 1, 2007
Below are your comments:
Monday July 4, 2005
Steve Van Der Linde
Pretoria South Africa, Gauteng
196.41.30.38 I want to agree with you: The pigeons general Plumage becomes soft and shiny. The dark colours becomes even darker, instead of being dull and grayish. They move around with purpose and generally more mordant and alive. Regards Steve
Sunday January 15, 2006
Jim Scott
Burlington, IA
12.219.63.88 Where can I find Cid Pak?
Saturday April 1, 2006
gary mcintyre
stcatharines, on.
The cu sells the 4 way acid pack.
Friday July 7, 2006
ALBIE OWEN
LIVERPOOL U.K, UNITED KINGDOM
195.93.21.71 GREAT SITE HAVE TOLD ALL MY PIGEON MATES TO LOG ON TO IT, HAVE USED CIDER VINEGAR FOR THE PAST 10 YEARS AND THE BENEFITS ARE THERE TO BE SEEN, BIRDS LOOK GREAT AT ALL TIMES
Tuesday August 22, 2006
Howard Smith
Jamaica, NY
64.115.13.218 I guess I'm not the brightest bulb in the pack, and I need things simplified so that I can understand them. So can you just tell me... How much vinegar per gallon of water?
Monday October 30, 2006
Don Adams
Mooresville, IN
68.249.101.181 Can one use the acid-pac or vinger in combination with pro-biotics?
Monday November 27, 2006
SAMMY STEWART
SCOTLAND, LANARKSHIRE
82.40.79.95 WERE CAN WE PURCHASE THIS ACID PAK FROM CAN ANY ONE TELL WERE ABOUTS IN THE UK
Thursday June 21, 2007
nassir al meer
safwa, saudia arabia
198.36.32.13 thanks for this good articals. can i add garlik with it in the water? best regard


GOD BLESS : A Loving Touch LLC By Marys Whitewings Web Address: www.Azwhitedoves.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks jpmorganloft,

I have contacted Cowboy via email. I hope to meet up with him soon.

I appreciate the contact.

Scott
 
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